10 Best Non-Toxic Nail Polish Brands for a Healthy Mani BY PAIGE STABLES

Best non-toxic nail polishKSENIYA OVCHINNIKOVAGETTY IMAGES

Traditional nail polish has acquired a bad rap, largely due to chemical ingredients and a harsh odor. Besides irritating your senses with a poignant scent, “nail polishes contain solvents and some ingredients that can potentially cause health issues and irritation if inhaled in large quantities,” says Sabina Wizemann, a senior chemist in the Health, Beauty & Environmental Sciences Lab at the Good Housekeeping Institute.

The strong aroma may not be the only thing that’s harsh about some nail polishes: chemicals in common nail lacquer formulas could potentially enter the body through your nail beds. study by researchers at Duke University detected evidence of a common nail polish chemical called triphenyl phosphate, or TPHP, in the bodies of every woman who volunteered to paint her nails for the study.

The good news: many advancements have been made in nail polish formulations since this study. There are options without that particular harmful chemical, and other potentially dangerous ingredients, which brings us to so-called “nontoxic” or “natural” nail lacquers.

What makes a nail polish non-toxic?

“Products are crossing off ‘toxic’ ingredients from formulas at rapid speed, and some brands offer vegan and gluten-free options,” says Wizemann. Most non-toxic nail polishes are three-free, meaning they do not contain formaldehyde, toluene, and dibutyl phthalate. Beyond that, polishes go as far as being nine-, or 10-, or even 14-free. Here’s the breakdown of what’s missing (thankfully!) from those formulas:

  • 5-free contains no formaldehyde, toluene, DBP, formaldehyde resin, camphor
  • 7-free contains no formaldehyde, toluene, DBP, formaldehyde resin, camphor, ethyl tosylamide, xylene
  • 9-free contains no formaldehyde, toluene, DBP, formaldehyde resin, camphor, ethyl tosylamide, xylene, parabens, acetone
  • 10-free contains no formaldehyde, toluene, DBP, formaldehyde resin, camphor, ethyl tosylamide, xylene, parabens, acetone, TPHP, TBHP, gluten

No matter which formula you choose, follow instructions, avoiding use in poorly-ventilated areas. Still wary? “Water-based formulas incorporate non-synthetic pigments and aqueous acrylic polymers, plus they are also odorless,” says Wizemann. Though easy to apply, they are often not as long-lasting. Here, the “cleanest” nail lacquers available right now:

1

14-FREE

Pure Cover Nail Paint

OROSA BEAUTY
OROSAorosabeauty.com

$12.00

Orosa’s nail lacquer bottles up all the good things: a quick-dry formula, week-long wear, and fresh color. The vegan and cruelty-free formula is made without 14 controversial ingredients.

Made without: Formaldehyde, dibutyl phthalate (DBP), formaldehyde resin, toluene, camphor, triphenyl phosphate, ethyl tosylamide, xylene, MEHQ/HQ, MIT, palm oil, parabens, animal-derived ingredients, and gluten.

2

14-FREE

Nail Lacquer

AILA
AILAloveaila.com

$3.95

Founded by a podiatric surgeon, Aila has a strong focus on maintaining the health of your nails. The vegan, cruelty-free, and gluten-free lacquers come in a rainbow of vibrant shades as well as neutrals.

Made without: Parabens, sulfates, formaldehyde, formaldehyde resin, camphor, dibutyl phthalate, toluene, triphenyl phosphate, xylene, bismuth oxychloride, ethyl tosylamide, methylisothiazolinone
hydroquinone monomethyl ether, and plant derivatives.

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3

10-FREE

Nail Polish

New look for The Charming Magick Online Shop! Have a look :-)

Hey lovely peeps!  We’ve made some changes to our online shop and cleaned up a lot of mistakes.  We’re not 100% finished with it…..and we’ll probably never be because it’s a work in progress, but things are looking a lot better!

Click the picture below and have a look.  Afterward, you can let us know what you think by purchasing something (wink wink), or clicking the contact button and leaving your feedback, or by writing directly to me at:  igo4more@web.de

Click the pic below

Charming Magick Shop

The day we went MAD foraging for mushrooms in Latvia – BY BUDGETTRAVELLER

barabika-mushroom

‘What are you doing today?’

Nothing.

Let’s go mushroom picking.’

Our guide for the day, Latvian blogger Zane Enina ofMugursoma.lv fame tells me that this is a pretty common conversation amongst Latvians during Autumn.

I wonder immediately if they are enough mushrooms for every Latvian to go mushroom picking.

‘50% of Latvia is covered by forests. There are always enough mushrooms for everyone. Plus a whole lot of space to get lost in and escape reality.’

We’re rolling through an open road about 100 kms outside of Riga. We’re surrounded by dense forests and an immense blanket of silence. We’ve been driving for almost 20 minutes from Zane’s house in Vangazi and there’s been nothing but green forests and deep blue skies.

roaming-wild-free-latvia

I’m pretty excited about the idea of foraging for food. It has been one of those skills I’ve been always curious to learn more about. My father grew up in a rural part of India where nature’s bounty was rich. The garden of the house he grew up in was more like a jungle. You could find everything here from the freshest (hottest) green chillies

READ MORE HERE:

https://budgettraveller.org/foraging-for-wild-mushrooms-in-latvia/

Hair Dye: How Badly Does It Damage Your Hair? By: Jess Bolluyt

woman gets new hair colour

If there’s a particular way you like to wear your hair, chances are good that you’re doing some damage to it in the process. Heat-styling tools can easily hurt your hair. Similarly, chemically straightening or curling your hair can leave it dried out. And using hair products that are bad for your health can damage your hair and exacerbate other health issues.

The problem is that it’s pretty easy to avoid thinking about how badly hair dye can damage your hair. That’s because we all have our routines. Whether you have a running appointment with your stylist or a long-standing love affair with your favorite drugstore hair dye, you know the drill. You’re used to the routine and probably don’t think too much about it, even if it involves damaging bleach or colors that simply won’t fade.

So if you routinely dye your hair, or are thinking about starting, now might be a good time to learn a little bit about exactly what hair dye does to your locks. Here’s what you must know.

Ammonia lifts the hair cuticle, and peroxide destroys the color

A Hari's salon employee has her hair rinsed

Here’s how hair dye stays in your hair. | Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Cosmetic chemist Ni’Kita Wilson explains to The Huffington Post that in order to deposit color onto your hair, the dye has to be able to get into the hair shaft. To do that, it has to move beyond the cuticle, which acts a little bit like tree bark and protects your hair from damage. To penetrate beyond the cuticle, hair dye uses ammonia to elevate the pH of the hair and to relax and lift the cuticle. Immediately, you’ve damaged your hair, since the cuticle isn’t meant to be lifted up.

Once the cuticle is lifted, the next step is to dye the hair your intended color. So, hair dye uses peroxide to break down your natural hair pigment. Peroxide is extremely drying to hair and is the reason why colored hair can take on a straw-like texture. As the peroxide developer sits, the cuticle remains lifted for the dye to penetrate into the open cuticle and hair shaft. The longer the cuticle is lifted, the more it weakens. Once you rinse your hair, the cuticle comes back down. But damage has already been done.

If you’re interested in the specifics of how the process works, chemistry teacher Andy Brunning reports on his blog Compound Interest that hydrogen peroxide is a strong oxidizing agent. It oxidizes the natural melanin pigments in hair, removing some of the conjugated double bonds that lead to their color, making them colorless. Actually dyeing the hair requires an alkaline pH, provided by the ammonia, which causes the cuticle to swell and can ultimately damage the hair.

Less-damaging alternatives don’t last as long

A hairdresser washing the hair of a client at a salon in Taipei.

You can try less-damaging hair dyeing methods, but they might not be as effective. | Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images