Count Down to Yule – 2 Playlists of Pagan Yule Songs

This is one song off a Yule playlist with 50 songs by S J Tucker and other pagan soloists and groups on youtube.com

Play List of 50 Yule Pagan Songs

This is one song off a Yule playlist with 112 songs by Enya and other pagan soloists and groups on youtube.com. This play list includes instrumentals that could be played during your Yule ritual and/or celebration. Some of the songs include prayers and other things that could enhance your Yule.

Play List of 112 Pagan Yule Songs

 

Count Down to Litha – 2 Playlists of Pagan Music for Litha

This is a play list of 50 videos that include songs in different languages with English subtitles and some different ways of celebrating Litha found on youtube.com

50 Pagan Songs for Litha

This is a playlist of 63 pagan songs for celebrating Litha also found on youtube.com

63 Pagan Songs to Celebrate Litha

This is one of my favorite songs to listen to outside to drum and dance to

Dance, My Children Dance

 

A Yule Drink and Litha Cake Combined Them for Brunch Solstice Feast – Flashback to 2012

I know I have been doing separate posts for Yule and Litha things but when I came across these two recipes, in Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2012, one for each season of the year the two hemispheres are going into, they sounded yummy to me to have together. I apologize in advance for not calculating from American measurements to other parts of Mother Earth. I just found this website https://www.europeancuisines.com/ while it says European Cuisines it covers other countries as well.

(SIDE NOTE if you do not have a Sun shaped disc to pour the batter in use cookie cutters for whatever shapes remind you of the Sun or use a knife to cut out a shape. Even a young maybe 3 or older this totally up to the child’s caregivers can cut out a design. Than either eat the scraps from the cut outs or put them outside for the wildlife in your area to celebrate the Solstice with your family. This is a good day to have breakfast for dinner/supper/tea or use as treated after your families Solstice ritual)

“Sun God Supreme

1 cup flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

2 Tablespoons of melted butter or oil

1 egg

3/4 cup yogurt

Garnish with 3 cups cubed fruit, all colors

Sift dry ingredients together. Then separately whisk wet ingredients together. Combined wet and dry ingredients, mixing for no more then 20 strokes, one for each day in June (or December) until the Solstice. Let mixture sit for 10 minutes     while you prepare the fruit, set the table, and heat the frying pan lightly coated with oil or butter on a medium heat. (SIDE NOTE AGAIN Depending on the ages of the people attending your celebration feast designated cutting the fruit, setting and clearing the table, and doing dishes along with wiping the table and kitchen surfaces. If you allow a child of 3 to cut up their pancake with a plastic knife this can also be used to slice bananas or other soft fruit. This is a family celebration so let the family help with the work and as your homes Priestess you can relax and enjoy the feast and time together with a lot less stress) 

Pour batter into sun-shaped discs (or pour batter from a measuring cup with a lip to get lovely round pancakes.) cook until bubbles that have formed in the batter burst and make little dry craters. Flip one and briefly cook the other side. Serve on brighly colored plates surrounded by fruit of all colors, which represent the abundant growth and glory of the Earth Goddess. Drizzle with honey or maple syrup and enjoy.

Pancakes combine the traditional foods of Litha — butter, milk, cakes, and honey — represent the Sun God at the height of his reign.

Copyright Dallas Jennifer Cobb page 77

Magical Mulled Cider

(SIDE NOTE This cider contains no alcohol so the whole family can enjoy it. If you want to spike it for the adults I have used dark rum measured to the adult who is drinking it taste. It is also good cooled to room temperature but I did not like the taste will chilled in the refrigerator)

1 quart (or 1 liter) apple cider

6 orange, sliced to look like the sun

12 whole cloves

1/8 teaspoon of nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

6 cinnamon sticks

Honey to taste

Toast the return of the Sun God, and the holy rebirth, with this warming drink when you gather with friends and family on the longest night of the year, Best made over an open fire, but easily concocted on a stove indoors will warm the hearth, heart, and home. Sip this and know anything is possible.

In a large pot combine apple cider which represents the Sun God, cloves, nutmeg, and ground cinnamon. Simmer for at least half an hour to make your house smell wonderfully festive, or longer for a stronger mulled taste. This simmering symbolically brings the God and Goddess together. and adds a little “spice” to the mix. Pour into a mug, carefully an orange slice into each cup. Add cinnamon stick and serve. Makes 6 servings.

Copyright by Dallas Jennifer Cobb page 129

 

9 Winter Solstice Superstitions & What They Mean That Will Prepare You For Dec. 21 By ALLI HOFF KOSIK

 

Hugh Pinney/Getty Images News/Getty Images

I’m sure your top concern as we approach the upcoming winter solstice may be just how many more minutes of sun you’re going to get during your commute each day, but the truth is that the event is steeped in history and tradition that goes far beyond our modern taste for convenience and, well, light. With history, of course, comes superstition, so I did a little research and pulled together some details about some winter solstice superstitions, where they come from, what they mean, and how they play into the way we observe the month of December in modern times (if at all).

First, a brief lesson in what the winter solstice actually is: According to the trusty Farmer’s Almanac, it’s the day each year that has the fewest hours of sunlight, thanks to the fact that the sun reaches its southernmost point and begins moving north. The winter solstice is also the first day of the astronomical winter (the meteorological winter kicks off several weeks earlier). Since 2017’s winter solstice will take place on Dec. 21, the days will begin getting longer as of Dec. 22. Did I just make your (very short) day?

Now that we’ve got the basics down, check out these superstitions.

1. Dark Spirits Walk The Earth During The Winter Solstice

Shab-e Yalda — the Iranian festival that celebrates the birth of the ancient sun god who triumphed over darkness — is celebrated on the longest night of the year, aka the winter solstice. To observe the festival, a feast of watermelon, nuts, and pomegranate seeds is consumed… but that’s not all. Because of the light vs. dark symbolism, ancient lore holds that evil spirits wander the earth on this night stronger than ever, according to MentalFloss. There are shades of similar superstitions in Celtic and Germanic folklore too.

2. The 2012 Winter Solstice Should Have Been The End Of The World

Remember the 2012 end of days hysteria? Thankfully, it was nothing more than a superstition — but it was a superstition rooted in Mayan history. The winter solstice of that year (Dec. 21, 2012) corresponded to the date 13.0.0.0.0 on the Mesoamerican Long Count calendar and was the end of a 5126-year cycle. According to the superstition, these numbers were symbolic of the end of the world, or some other catastrophe.

3. The 2012 Winter Solstice Should Have Kicked Off A Worldwide Transformation

The flip side of the “Winter Solstice as the end of days” coin? The New Age belief that the significance of Dec. 21, 2012 was one of rebirth and transformation. Some believed that the Earth and all of its inhabitants would experience some sort of wonderful metamorphosis on that day.

4. The Winter Solstice Honors The Coming Of The Light

If you’ve been counting the minutes until you can leave the office when it’s still light outside, this one should make a lot of sense to you. Given the fact that

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.bustle.com/p/9-winter-solstice-superstitions-what-they-mean-that-will-prepare-you-for-dec-21-7593175