History of Friday the 13th

Long considered a harbinger of bad luck, Friday the 13th has inspired a late 19th-century secret society, an early 20th-century novel, a horror film franchise and not one but two unwieldy terms—paraskavedekatriaphobia and friggatriskaidekaphobia—that describe fear of this supposedly unlucky day.

The Fear of 13

Just like walking under a ladder, crossing paths with a black cat or breaking a mirror, many people hold fast to the belief that Friday the 13th brings bad luck. Though it’s uncertain exactly when this particular tradition began, negative superstitions have swirled around the number 13 for centuries.

While Western cultures have historically associated the number 12 with completeness (there are 12 days of Christmas, 12 months and zodiac signs, 12 labors of Hercules, 12 gods of Olympus and 12 tribes of Israel, just to name a few examples), its successor 13 has a long history as a sign of bad luck.

The ancient Code of Hammurabi, for example, reportedly omitted a 13th law from its list of legal rules. Though this was probably a clerical error, superstitious people sometimes point to this as proof of 13’s longstanding negative associations.

Fear of the number 13 has even earned a psychological term: triskaidekaphobia.

Why is Friday the 13th Unlucky?

According to biblical tradition, 13 guests attended the Last Supper, held on Maundy Thursday, including Jesus and his 12 apostles (one of whom, Judas, betrayed him). The next day, of course, was Good Friday, the day of Jesus’ crucifixion.

The seating arrangement at the Last Supper is believed to have given rise to a longstanding Christian superstition that having 13 guests at a table was a bad omen—specifically, that it was courting death.

Though Friday’s negative associations are weaker, some have suggested they also have roots in Christian tradition: Just as Jesus was crucified on a Friday, Friday was also said to be the day Eve gave Adam the fateful apple from the Tree of Knowledge, as well as the day Cain killed his brother, Abel.

The Thirteen Club

In the late-19th century, a New Yorker named Captain William Fowler (1827-1897) sought to remove the enduring stigma surrounding the number 13—and particularly the unwritten rule about not having 13 guests at a dinner table—by founding an exclusive society called the Thirteen Club.

The group dined regularly on the 13th day of the month in room 13 of the Knickerbocker Cottage, a popular watering hole Fowler owned from 1863 to 1883. Before sitting down for a 13-course dinner, members would pass beneath a ladder and a banner reading “Morituri te Salutamus,” Latin for “Those of us who are about to die salute you.”

Four former U.S. presidents (Chester A. ArthurGrover ClevelandBenjamin Harrison and Theodore Roosevelt) would join the Thirteen Club’s ranks at one time or another.

Friday the 13th in Pop Culture

An important milestone in the history of the Friday the 13th legend in particular (not just the number 13) occurred in 1907, with the publication of the novel Friday, the Thirteenth written by Thomas William Lawson.

The book told the story of a New York City stockbroker who plays on superstitions about the date to create chaos on Wall Street, and make a killing on the market.

The horror movie Friday the 13th, released in 1980, introduced the world to a hockey mask-wearing killer named Jason, and is perhaps the best-known example of the famous superstition in pop culture history. The movie spawned multiple sequels, as well as comic books, novellas, video games, related merchandise and countless terrifying Halloween costumes.

What bad things happened on Friday 13th?

On Friday, October 13, 1307, officers of King Philip IV of France arrested hundreds of the Knights Templar, a powerful religious and military order formed in the 12th century for the defense of the Holy Land.

Imprisoned on charges of various illegal behaviors (but really because the king wanted access to their financial resources), many Templars were later executed. Some cite the link with the Templars as the origin of the Friday the 13th superstition, but like many legends involving the Templars and their history, the truth remains murky.

In more recent times, a number of traumatic events have occurred on Friday the 13th, including the German bombing of Buckingham Palace(September 1940); the murder of Kitty Genovese in Queens, New York (March 1964); a cyclone that killed more than 300,000 people in Bangladesh (November 1970); the disappearance of a Chilean Air Force plane in the Andes (October 1972); the death of rapper Tupac Shakur (September 1996) and the crash of the Costa Concordia cruise ship off the coast of Italy, which killed 30 people (January 2012).

Sources

“The Origins of Unlucky Friday the 13th,” Live Science.
“Friday the 13th: why is it unlucky and other facts about the worst day in the calendar,” The Telegraph.
“13 Freaky Things That Happened on Friday the 13th,” Live Science.
“Here’s Why Friday the 13th is Considered Unlucky,” Time.
“Friggatriskaidekaphobes Need Not Apply,” New-York Historical Society.

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There’s a Full Moon Due on Friday the 13th for Most of the U.S. The Next One Isn’t for Another 30 Years

Time Magazine September 12, 2019

BY GINA MARTINEZ

The next full moon is set to make an appearance on the most ominous date on the calendar this month.

A September full moon, also known as a “Harvest Moon,” will be visible to many Americans this Friday the 13th.

According to NASA, the moon will be full early Saturday morning, Sept. 14, at 12:33 a.m. EST, but for those who live in the Central, Mountain and Pacific time zones, the full moon will be visible shortly before midnight on Friday the 13th.

NASA says that the moon will appear full for about three days centered around this time — from Thursday night through Sunday morning.

To read the rest Friday 13, 2019

Tea Talk Thursday 1 Aug 2019 By: The Silver Sage Witch (Victoria) :-)

Oh my Goddess! It’s time for another episode of Tea Talk Thursday! PLUS new music from a NEW ARTIST!
PLEASE: Subscribe, Watch, Like, and Shaaaaare. Thanks!

Do You Believe in Magick? By: Kathleen Granville

Since the beginning of time, man has been fascinated with the supernatural, with the idea of just pointing a finger and having everything that you desire. The concept of magic is in every culture and in every form of media — but do you believe in magic? According to the Merriam Webster dictionary, the word magic comes from the Iranian magos and is akin to the Old Persian word magus, which means sorcerer. Sorcerer and the root word sorcery have very negative connotations, as it is power gained from the assistance or control of evil spirits. That is not what I am talking about and we will clarify the difference. The dictionary defines magic as “the use of means (such as charms or spells) to have supernatural power over natural forces” or “an extraordinary power or influence from a supernatural source”. The third definition is “the art of producing illusions by sleight of hand”.

For our purposes today, we will be talking about “magick” with a “k”, to differentiate between Pagan ritual magick and a magician’s illusions. Among Pagans, and particularly among those who follow Wicca, magick is a part of their spiritual path. I realize that the reputation for using magic is a major attraction for many people to explore the Wiccan path. They think that they are going to be handed some fantastic power that will gain them what they want without much effort on their part. Surprise! This is not the way magick works.

The simplest answer to “What is Pagan Magick and how does it work?” is this: that it is a concentrated mental effort (visualization) to bring about a physical, visible change in something (realization). In other words, if you can picture it in your head, it will occur in the physical world. And what might surprise you is that prayer, in the most Christian sense of that word, can also be defined exactly the same way. However, instead of praying that a god will work the change for them, Pagans “raise energy”, or call upon the natural power that is all around us (sort of like “The Force” in Star Wars) and work with that power to make a change occur.

It should be made very clear that this natural power is neither holy nor evil. It exists, like electricity. What makes it good or bad is the purpose for which it is used. Part of the learning process for Wicca is that everything (and I do mean everything) that you do comes back to you at least three fold. So hexing or cursing someone is NOT a good idea since that negative intention will come back to bite you in the…you get the picture. This is also stressed by the Wiccan Rede, which states “And it harm none, do as thou will”. This is not total liberty to behave however you want without regard to others. In fact, it can be more restrictive than any of the Ten Commandments if you have to really stop and consider the consequences of your actions. Part of Paganism’s greatest strength is that it requires you to take responsibility for what you do. You can’t blame it on anyone else or some external evil entity like Satan.

There are limitations upon what is considered acceptable magick. Your magickal purpose needs to be extremely clear or you can end up with other than the desired results. You have to focus on what you are trying to do; you have to have a very specific goal in mind. Adherence to the Three-Fold Law and the Wiccan Rede means that it should come as no surprise there are also warnings about performing magick upon other people without their express consent. This means it’s not a good idea to use magick to

READ MORE:  https://medium.com/upsetting-the-world-view/do-you-believe-in-magick-8968a59dade5

Continue reading “Do You Believe in Magick? By: Kathleen Granville”

Goddess Knowledge – Hathor

Hathor, a nourishing great mother goddess, is the Egyptian mother of all gods and goddesses. Usually portrayed as a cow, she is the sky goddess, the queen of the heavens: the sun emerges from her womb and the moon from her breast. She is the goddess of love, mirth, beauty, and sensual pleasure, as well as the protectress of all women. In her other guise, shown here, she is lady of the night and queen of the underworld. With her lion’s head, Hathor assumes the role of destroyer and giver of death. In her leopard skin she is the goddess of fate and fortune and typifies the ferocity and swiftness of this animal, a night prowler and watcher. Hathor is a strong embodiment of the many sides of existence. Creator, sustainer, destroyer, she encompasses all. Hathor reminds us that we, too, must acknowledge all parts of ourselves necessary to allow our creativity and compassion to flourish.

For more information click here: Egyptian Goddess Hathor

To see images click here : Egyptian Goddess Hathor

THE “WICCA/WITCH” CONNECTION: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A WITCH AND A WICCAN?

Anyone who has ever been confused about whether Wiccans are Witches, or vice versa, can rest assured that they are not alone! These two words have been used in different ways, with sometimes very different connotations, for centuries. Today, they may be considered interchangeable by some practitioners of Wicca, but completely distinct from each other by others. Some Wiccans identify as Witches, while others do not. Furthermore, there are plenty of folks whose practice of Witchcraft has elements that overlap with Wicca, but who do not identify as Wiccans.

For Wiccans who don’t consider themselves Witches, the reason is usually that they don’t practice magic, which is the part that most people think of as “Witchcraft.” They worship the Goddess and God, celebrate the turning of the Wheel of the Year and live in harmony with nature, but they don’t seek to harness the natural energies at work in the Universe to bring about desired change in their lives. Therefore, these Wiccans are not Witches.

Interestingly enough, however, the origins of what we now know as Wicca were absolutely considered to be Witchcraft, as described by Gerald Gardner and many others who studied and practiced occult spirituality in the U.K. from the 1940s through the 1960s, where the Gardnerian and Alexandrian traditions were founded and developed. These pioneers of modern Witchcraft did view themselves as Witches, and in fact the word “Wicca” was not applied to these forms of the Craft until several years later, once the practice had spread to the United States.

So where does the word “wicca” come from? It’s actually an Old English word for “sorcerer” or “diviner,” and comes from the old Anglo-Saxon culture, where these magical skills were valued. As the English language evolved, “wicca” eventually became “witch,” a linguistic shift that occurred sometime during the 1500s. (Interestingly, the word “wiccan” in Old English was actually the plural form of “wicca,” whereas today it has become an adjective to describe anything associated with the religion of Wicca.) For his part, Gardner referred to his coven members as a whole as “the Wica,” and it’s believed that this is where the modern name Wicca evolved from.

Many who feel strongly about their self-identification as Witches will say that they are reclaiming the word from the centuries of Christian persecution, when it became an accusation rather than a respected title. No one in their right mind would have identified as a Witch during those times, but thankfully we have the freedom today to do so. Nonetheless, there’s still a long way to go in terms of removing the stigma from the “W” word, which may be why so many Witches choose to capitalize it—in order to distinguish it from the fairy-tale stereotype of the “wicked witch,” or an insult aimed at grouchy women. In fact, these negative connotations are why some Wiccans choose not to identify as Witches.

So how do you know which word to use? When it comes to describing yourself, you should always go with what resonates in your heart. When it comes to other people, you can always ask them respectfully how they self-identify. Because Wicca as we know it today is such an eclectic, individualized practice (aside from Traditional Wicca of course), it’s really up to individuals to decide what they’re comfortable with when it comes to the “W” word.

By: Wicca Living