Helping an Injured or Sick Hedgehog

Hedgehogs need our help

When you find an injured hedgehog, watch it first to see how badly hurt it is. Then seek immediate emergency treatment from a wildlife rehabilitator or local vet.

If you ever find a sick, injured or a hedgehog you are concerned about it needs to be protected and kept safe because *every minute matters.

If possible, try to wear suitable gloves to pick up the animal, then put them in a secure cardboard box with ventilation holes, lines with newspaper or a towel, if you can try to wrap them in a soft blanket (ideally use suitable gloves). Then ring for help by contacting a hedgehog or wildlife rescue centre or carer immediately. If you cannot get through take them to a local vet as soon as possible so they can give them emergency treatment.

Hedgehogs will often try crawling away, so keeping them protected in a well-ventilated box, even wrapped in a blanket will help. Try to take them indoors while you call for emergency help.

A good way to help them keep warm is to fill a hot water bottle up and cover it up completely with a towel, so it’s not hot and its gentle warmth for the box. Never allow the bottle to go cold, remove before it gets cold.

Put the box somewhere

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.treatmekind.org.uk/help-hedgehogs/

How to Trim Your Dog’s Toenails: 6 Steps (with Pictures) By beastbunny

A lot of people have trouble trimming their dog’s toenails. The key to making this less of a chore for you is to make it a positive experience for your dog. Learn how positive reinforcement can help your dog and you!

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Step 1: Supplies You’ll Need

Picture of Supplies You'll Need

Toenail clippers-There are two main kinds of clippers:scissor style and guillotine style. I prefer guillotine because I think they are easier to use and give a cleaner cut. No matter which style you choose, the sharper the clipper, the cleaner the cut and the faster the job gets done.

Styptic powder or pencil-Powder form is easier to use than to try and apply a pencil to your squirming dog’s foot.

Nail file-same kind you use on your own nails.

dog treats-commercial treats, string cheese, hot dog bits, whatever your dog

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-trim-your-dog-s-toenails/

What Age Should You Spay Your Dog? By Jessica Vogelsang, DVM

New puppy visits have to be one of my favorite appointments in veterinary medicine. Adorable puppies, excited owners, so many opportunities to lay the groundwork for a long and happy life together. We cover lots of topics: vaccinations, deworming schedules, training, nutrition. During the first visit, one of the most common questions I get with puppies is, “When should my pet be spayed or neutered?”

For a very long time, veterinary medicine offered a fairly standard response: Six months. But why is that? Is it truly in every pet’s best interests to be desexed, and if so, why this particular age? Let’s unpack this very important topic so that you understand the factors we consider when we give you our recommendation for spays and neuters.

Understand Exactly What a Spay or Neuter Entails

spay, known in veterinary parlance as ovariohysterectomy, is the surgical removal of both the ovaries and the uterus in female dogs. While ovariectomies (removal of the ovaries, leaving the uterus) are becoming more common in other parts of the world, the complete ovariohysterectomy is still the main procedure taught and performed in the United States. In the dog, the ovaries are up near the kidneys, and the y-shaped uterus extends from both ovaries down to the cervix. An ovariohysterectomy is a major abdominal surgery that carries with it, like all surgeries, risk and benefit.

A neuter procedure, or castration, removes the testicles from a male dog. Unless the dog has a retained testicle (a condition known as cryptorchidism), a neuter procedure does not enter the abdominal cavity. While still a major surgery, it is not as complex as a spay in a healthy, normal male dog.

The Size of the Pet Matters

A main reason veterinarians recommend a spay at six months as opposed to six weeks is concern for anesthesia. Very small pets can be more of a challenge in terms of temperature regulation and anesthetic safety, though with today’s advanced protocols, we can very safely and successfully anesthetize even tiny pediatric patients. In a shelter environment, where highly trained and experienced staff perform thousands of pediatric spays and neuters a year, it is not uncommon to perform these procedures in pets closer to

READ MORE:  https://www.petmd.com/dog/general-health/what-age-should-you-spay-your-dog

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