WHAT ARE THE BEST VEGETARIAN MEAT SUBSTITUTES AND ARE THEY GOOD FOR YOU? By Rachel Hosie

Make sure you get enough protein and the essential nutrients for a healthy lifestyle by choosing your meat-alternatives wisely

With veganism on the rise – a survey released last year found that around 3.5 million Britons have adopted a plant-based diet – many people are turning to meat substitutes to bulk out their meals and ensure they’re consuming enough protein.

While meat-free protein sources including beans, lentils, chickpeas, soya, nuts, seeds, wheat, rice, maize, milk, yoghurt and cheese all provide protein, many vegetarians like to consume mycoprotein, a single-cell protein derived from funghi.

Quorn is a mycoprotein and one of the best-known brands of meat alternatives. And in July 2018, the vegetarian company, best known for its meat-free mince and “chicken style” pieces, announced it will be investing £7m into a new product development centre with the hope of capitalising on the UK’s growing appetite for meat substitutes.

But whilst there’s no denying the benefit to the environment of cutting down your meat intake, do substitutes actually provide all the nutrients we need?

“Plant-based sources of protein are generally incomplete – they don’t contain all of the essential amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein – meaning it’s essential to eat a variety of them every day,” registered dietitian Nichola Ludlam-Raine explained to The Independent.

“Soya, quinoa and hemp are the only plant-based complete sources of protein i.e. they contain all of the essential amino acids that our body needs.”

Ludlam-Raine says it’s important to bear in mind, however, that meat-alternatives often contain a lot less protein than their

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/vegetarian-meat-substitutes-alternatives-best-tofu-quorn-jackfruit-a9047106.html

Is Juicing Raw Vegetables Good for You? | Livestrong.com

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.livestrong.com/article/481565-is-juicing-raw-vegetables-good-for-you/

Veggie Dumpling Stew By The Purple Carrot

By The Purple Carrot

Veggie Dumpling Stew

DINNER
Family FriendlySpring RecipesSoy-FreeBeans/LegumesRoot VegetablesAppetizerSide DishSoupDinner
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SERVINGS

2

PREP & COOK TIME
40 min
CALORIES
266
FAT
2g
CARBOHYDRATES
54g
PROTEIN
9g

MAIN INGREDIENTS

  1. 2 potatoes
  2. 3/4 cup peas
  3. 1 carrot
  4. 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
  5. 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  6. 3/4 cup almond milk
  7. 1 tablespoon agave
  8. 1 onion
  9. 2 garlic cloves, peeled
  10. 4 cups vegetable broth, used in two steps
  11. 1/4 cup fresh parsley
  12. 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast*
  13. 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano*
  14. 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary*
  15. 1/2 teaspoon dried basil*
  16. pinch salt**
  17. 2 tablespoons olive oil**
  18. * spice pack
  19. ** not included

TOOLS

  • Large Saucepan
  • Medium Bowl

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Prepare. Rinse and dry all produce. Peel and chop the onion; mince the garlic, peel and dice the carrot; dice the potato. Roughly chop the parsley, removing the stems. Place olive oil in a large saucepan over medium high heat.
2. Add two tablespoons of vegetable broth, the onion and 

Vegan Pumpkin Pie – Connoisseurus Veg

Vegan Pumpkin Pie

The best pumpkin pie you ever ate, and it just happens to be vegan! This luscious pie is rich, custardy, and packed with pumpkin spice flavor.

Author Alissa Saenz

Ingredients

  • 1 homemade vegan pie crust (or a store-bought one)
  • 1 (15 ounce) can pumpkin puree

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.connoisseurusveg.com/vegan-pumpkin-pie/#wprm-recipe-container-17076

Easy Vegan Quiche (Gluten Free + Unbelievably Divine)

This Easy Vegan Quiche is perfect for your breakfast or brunch! The filling, made with tofu, is loaded with burst tomatoes, caramelised onions and sautéed mushrooms and spinach and is baked in a buttery flaky crust!

This Easy Vegan Quiche is perfect for your breakfast or brunch! The filling, made with tofu, is loaded with burst tomatoes, caramelised onions and sautéed mushrooms and spinach and is baked in a buttery flaky crust! via https://jessicainthekitchen.com

Here’s my vision of a perfect Christmas breakfast table. Fresh croissants, some sort of baked French toast, a quiche, a plate of sliced fruits (pineapples, oranges and grapefruits) and a pitcher or an agua Fresca. Breakfast muffins on the side. Okay, now veganise it all. You guys know that I’ve made the overnight baked French toast for you, working on the croissants (or just buying vegan ones true story) and FINALLY – the quiche is here. I’m talking a filling, “eggy” Vegan Quiche that’s loaded up with caramelised onions, burst tomatoes, sautéed mushrooms and spinach and baked in a buttery flaky crust. I’m talking the kind of quiche you finish in less than 24 hours with your brother and your husband. The kind of quiche that makes you limit the other goodies to ensure you have space for one more slice.

This Easy Vegan Quiche is perfect for your breakfast or brunch! The filling, made with tofu, is loaded with burst tomatoes, caramelised onions and sautéed mushrooms and spinach and is baked in a buttery flaky crust! via https://jessicainthekitchen.com

After making these quiche muffin cups, I wanted more quiche action in my life. I mentioned in that post that my go to brunch option as a vegetarian was a slice of quiche, toast and a side salad. It made me feel like I had my life put together, ladies who brunch kinda thing. Fast forward to turning vegan (and having months on and off before that where I would just randomly hate eggs) I can finally have my cake (quiche – close enough) and

READ MORE HERE:  https://jessicainthekitchen.com/easy-vegan-quiche-gluten-free-unbelievably-divine/

 

 

 

 

 

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Let’s Face It: There Is No Such Thing as Humane Meat By: Ingrid Newkirk

Looking at online menus for a restaurant to take a visiting friend, I read “humane meat” and had to do a double-take. This bizarre concept, already seen on labels in upscale grocery stores, is invading eateries so that anyone who wishes to order the chicken can feel sort of OK or even really good about it. What are we thinking? That the animals were blown away in the middle of the night while dreaming sweet dreams after a life of comfy straw and the sun on their backs in lush green meadows, like in the fantasy cheese commercials that PETA sued to have removed from the airways, the ones that failed to show the real misery and muck in which California’s dairy cows languish until the truck comes to take them to you-know-where? Or maybe you don’t know where.

One hates to be absolute, but in my view, there is no such thing as humane meat. Perhaps if we were being asked to consider roadkill, which at least would not be cruelly raised or even killed by us (someone else’s non-commissioned vehicle doesn’t count) if we scraped it up off the tarmac and ate it, but that’s not what we are being asked to consider. Rather, it is being suggested that we actually find it acceptable to eat the flesh of animals who were very much alive, had friends and family — or, more likely, were deprived of them — and went through enormous trauma despite some small courtesies, such as perhaps 2 inches of additional space in their jam-packed prison cells. Yes, kicking the dog six times a week instead of seven is marginally better, but that doesn’t mean that we should go around suggesting that people kick the dog, just not as often, does it?

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Calling this sad flesh “humane” is like calling Britney Spears an opera singer. Yes, “Baby One More Time” may be easier on the ear than fingers on a blackboard, but it’s hardly Wagner’s “Ring Cycle,” is it? I could go along with SLCBSU, or “slightly less cruel but still unacceptable,” meat, but it’s definitely still not humane by a long shot.

There’s nothing humane about the flesh of animals who have had one or two or even three improvements made in their singularly rotten lives on today’s factory farms. Perhaps they are allowed outside into a patch of mud if they can fight their way out through the 10,000 other hens competing to get through the hatchway. Perhaps they are allowed to share a box in which to lay their eggs. Perhaps they are not kept in iron maidens or sow stalls in which they can never turn around. But the rest of their lot in life and the manner in which they are otherwise treated outside these reductions in abysmal treatment are still an abomination.

By being asked to support meat from living beings who are marginally less cruelly treated, we are being encouraged to support animal breeders, the people who bring our fellow animals into this world for the sole purpose of putting them through the wringer — causing them stress, trauma and pain — and then, because we’ll pay for those body parts, pronouncing, “Off with their heads!” In asking us to endorse humane meat, we are also being asked to endorse artificial insemination (a hideously terrifying procedure carried out on what farmers themselves call “rape racks”) and to support mutilations such as castration, dewattling, decombing, and ear-punching — all without painkillers. Being asked to support humane meat means being asked to support the suffering of animals in transport, to approve of treatment that causes them palpable fear, their bodies shaking and their eyes wide as saucers, as they are slung by their legs into crates that are slammed onto the back of a truck. And we are being asked to find acceptable and humane their experience of barreling down the highway in the freezing cold and sweltering heat. How can we accept any of that if we are against cruelty to animals? It’s simple — we can’t.

By being asked to endorse this grossly misnamed “humane meat,” we are being asked to endorse the ways in which the animals are killed, the final moments that culminate in the fear and the stench of the slaughterhouse. For most meat is obtained from the slaughterhouse, a place of blood and offal and struggles and screams. If that is so humane, why don’t we take the kids and make a day of it? Because it isn’t humane, that’s why.

All of us in society are supposed to believe that cruelty to animals is wrong and that it is a good thing to prevent needless suffering. So if that is true, how can meat be acceptable under any but the most extraordinary circumstances, such as perhaps roasting the bird who died flying into a window? The pig or hen’s misery

 

READ MORE:  https://www.huffpost.com/entry/humane-meat_b_2765996

 

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