BBC – Earth – Why do leaves change colour in autumn? By Chris Packham

The glory of autumn explained: Chris Packham reveals why leaves change from greens to reds and golden yellows.

The spectacle of green leaves turning rich reds and yellows in autumn happens when trees have taken all the food they can from the leaves that are filled with chlorophyll – the biomolecule that absorbs energy from sunlight and gives leaves their green colour.

When sunlight wanes and leaves stop making food, this green pigment is broken down into colourless compounds. Yellow pigments are then revealed and other chemical changes cause red colouration.

Enjoy the splendour of this wonderful transition of the seasons in this video.

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TASMANIA’S FLESH EATING PLANTS BY LULU MORRIS

You may have heard of insect-catching plants like the Venus fly trap but have you ever come across the infamous flesh-eating plants of Tasmania?

The southern island boasts an impressive array of carnivorous plants that will eat insects and any small prey that they can get their carnivorous florets on – but not anything as big as a human so you can tread safely in the Tasmanian bush.

Darren Cullen from Tasmania collects the flesh eating plants. His impressive assortment include the popular and common as well as the rare and endemic.

WE GET PEOPLE TRAVELLING HERE TO SEE TASMANIAN CARNIVOROUS PLANTS. WE HAVE TWO GENERA OF CARNIVOROUS PLANTS HERE, DROSERA AND UTRICULARIA, OTHERWISE KNOWN AS SUNDEWS AND BLADDERWORTS. YOU GROW BLADDERWORTS FOR THEIR AMAZING FLOWERS AS THE TRAPS ARE UNDERGROUND.

The flesh-eating plants are technically endangered in Tasmania but are commonly found around Victoria and in parts of New Zealand.

WHAT FLESH DO THESE PLANTS EAT?

Sundews, one of the state’s most sought after carnivores, are known for their glandular tentacles that are covered in a sticky liquid secretion. Their prey, which mostly consists of insects are attracted to the sweet smell of the sticky liquid that the plant secretes. Once this liquid is touched by their prey, they become trapped in the sticky mucus and die from asphyxiation as it envelops them.

The tentacles can move in

READ MORE HERE: https://www.nationalgeographic.com.au/australia/tasmanias-flesh-eating-plants.aspx

 

THE BUCKET LIST: 37 DIFFERENT TYPES OF COFFEE TO TRY by Asser Christensen

different kinds of coffee (1)

I get it; coffee can be confusing. Back in the days, you only really had to think about whether you wanted it with sugar or milk, or just black, but recently more and more crazy concoctions have sprung up.

This is my attempt at making a list that covers all different types of coffee and whether you should try them or not.

COMMON TYPES OF BLACK COFFEES

  1. Drip Coffee: This is the classic coffee from your childhood. It’s brewed with a drip coffee machine and a paper filter. You already know whether or not you like this coffee, so I’m not going to give you any advice here.
  2. Batch Brew: This kind of coffee is similar to drip coffee, but usually it’s made with a larger brewing device. Many specialty coffee shops have started offering this type of coffee, which means that it’s often an excellent option if you want a delicious cup of coffee with no additions.
  3. Espresso: A tiny cup of coffee, usually around 1 oz, originating in Italy. Brewed on an espresso machine that can force hot water through a puck of finely ground coffee with at least 9 bars of pressure. Espresso has a layer of golden-brownish crema on top. This type of coffee is the foundation of many other coffee drinks.
  4. Americano: This type of coffee is an espresso diluted with hot water. Strength-wise it’s usually slightly stronger than drip coffee, and the flavor is often a bit more ‘roasty’ and intense.
  5. Pour Over: Similar to drip coffee, except it has been brewed manually by the barista. Often he or she will use a small pour overcone from a company such as Hario and slowly add water with a gooseneck kettle. One of my favorite brew methods.
  6. Instant coffee: Pour hot water on freeze-dried coffee. Stir. Easy to make but usually not very tasty as a cheap type of coffee called ‘Robusta’ is mostly used.

LESSER KNOWN BLACK COFFEES

  1. Ristretto: An espresso with only half as much water and an even finer grind size resulting in a super intense flavor.
  2. Doppio: Italian word for ‘double espresso.’
  3. Long Black: Australian expression for ‘Americano.’
  4. Siphon Coffee: Brewed using a glass device called a Siphon or vacuum brewing pot. It relies on vacuum to pull water through ground coffee. Mostly seen in specialty coffee shops like Blue Bottle. A nuanced, yet bold coffee brewing method.
  5. Aeropress: This kind of coffee is made by using something that looks like an oversized syringe. The brew method combines both immersion and infusion. By using air pressure, it forces the brewed coffee through a paper filter. Cup quality can be excellent; a cheap and easy way to make good coffee at home.
  6. Turkish Coffee: Finely ground coffee is boiled in a unique kettle with sugar and served unfiltered. Not only served in Turkey, but also in parts of Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

MILK-BASED COFFEES

  1. Cappuccino: One of the most common types of coffee. Consists of a double shot of espresso and equal parts of steamed milk and milk foam on top.
  2. Latte: A caffe latte (or just latte, as it’s usually called) is a

READ MORE HERE:  https://coffeechronicler.com/different-types-of-coffee/

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Watch “Beginners guide to dowsing” on YouTube

So INTERESTING!

Enjoy the video and have a good day!

Are hurricanes getting stronger – and is climate breakdown to blame? By Oliver Milman

What is a hurricane, exactly?

A hurricane is a large rotating storm that forms over tropical or subtropical waters in the Atlantic. These low pressure weather systems draw upon warm water and atmospheric moisture to fuel their strength and will gather pace if not slowed by patches of dry air, crosswinds or landfall.

“They are very tall towers of winds that move at the same speed, sometimes 60,000ft tall,” says Jim Kossin, a scientist at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “If they are unmolested by wind shear or run over land they will continue on their merry way.”

READ MORE:  https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/may/20/are-hurricanes-getting-stronger-and-is-the-climate-crisis-to-blame

 

 

 

 

 

 

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How to Identify the 10 Different Types of Clouds Posted by Christine Sarikas

feature_clouds

Do you need to know the different types of clouds for school, or are you just interested in what’s up there in the sky? At first glance, all clouds can look pretty much the same, but with a bit of knowledge and practice you can soon learn how to tell exactly which kind of cloud you’re looking at.

In this guide, we show you all the steps to becoming a cloud-identifying expert. We’ll go over the ten main types of clouds and give you the info you need to identify each cloud type, including cloud names, their shape, height in the sky, color, and the weather you can expect them to bring.

We’ll end with some additional tips for identifying clouds, including easy tricks to differentiate similar-looking cloud types.

The 10 Main Types of Clouds

How many types of clouds are there? Generally speaking, there are ten main types of clouds you’ll see in the sky, and we discuss each of them below. For each of these different types of clouds, we’ve included a picture of the cloud, a short description, and the following additional information:

  • Height: Where in the sky the cloud typically occurs (low-level, mid-level, or high-level)
  • Color: The color of the cloud
  • Shape: The form the cloud typically takes
  • Weather: The weather the cloud is usually associated with or predicts

 

Altocumulus

altocumulus

Image source: Angelo Su/Flickr

  • Height: Mid
  • Color: White
  • Shape: Heap-like and often grouped together
  • Weather: Varies

Altocumulus clouds are fairly common clouds that look like round white or gray patches in the sky. They are sometimes grouped in parallel lines and have been described as looking similar to tufts of wool or fish scales.

 

Altostratus

altostratus

Image source: Wonderlane/Flickr (cropped from original)

  • Height: Mid
  • Color: White or light gray
  • Shape: Thick and flat
  • Weather: Usually indicate warmer weather is approaching; can cause light precipitation

These clouds form a white or gray layer that blankets the sky at mid-level. There are usually no patches of blue sky when these clouds appear, but the sun is often visible as a dimly lit disk behind the clouds (although no shadows appear on the ground).

 

Cirrocumulus

cirrocumulus

  • Height: High
  • Color: White or gray
  • Shape: Rows of small patchy clouds
  • Weather: Typically sunny and cold

Cirrocumulus clouds are much smaller than most other types of clouds, and they are sometimes called cloudlets. They are found at high altitudes and are made of ice crystals. They often are arranged in parallel rows. They are one of the rarer types of clouds and usually don’t last long.

 

Cirrostratus

Cirrostratus

Image source: aivas14/Flickr

  • Height: High
  • Color: Transparent/white
  • Shape: Wispy, but thicker than cirrus clouds
  • Weather: Varies

These are transparent, wispy clouds that

READ MORE:  https://blog.prepscholar.com/what-are-the-different-types-of-clouds

 

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