How to Fertilize Roses Co-authored by Lauren Kurtz

Lauren Kurtz, Horticulturist

Growing beautiful roses requires care and lots of nutrients. You can grow your roses best with a food balance that’s high in nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, as well as some secondary nutrients and minerals. Natural fertilizers provide steady nutrients to the soil long-term, and there are many types to choose from. Chemical fertilizers are fast-acting and need only 1-3 applications for the year. Many rose gardeners prefer to combine the two types of fertilizer for the best results.

Part1

Learning to Use Natural Fertilizers

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    1
    Use natural fertilizers before planting and before your rose’s first bloom. For new and small rose plants, it’s best to use organic fertilizers to avoid burning their delicate roots. Add nutrients to the soil before planting your rose bush, and after you first plant them, with natural fertilizers. Wait until after they bloom the first time before using any chemical fertilizers.[1]

    • In early spring, before roses come out of dormancy and start to bloom, using natural fertilizers is the best way to get roses accustomed to new nutrients in the soil.
    • Look for fertilizers labeled organic at a local garden supply store, or use the recipes in the homemade fertilizers section.
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    2
    Apply natural fertilizers every 4 weeks during high growth season. To keep a steady amount of nutrients flowing into your roses’ soil, use natural fertilizers every 4 weeks from early spring until 3-4 weeks before they enter dormancy. Work whatever fertilizer you choose into the upper soil levels.[2]

    • Spread solid or granular natural fertilizers in a circle around the top of the soil about 6 in (15 cm) from the base of the bush and work it into the top 2 in (5.1 cm) of soil with a small cultivator.
    • Liquid natural fertilizers can be poured in a circle about 6 in (15 cm) from the base of the bush.
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    Stop all fertilization 35-40 days before the first frost date. Applying fertilizers too late in the growing season could cause young, soft growth that’s easily damaged by the first frost. To encourage your roses to begin preparing for winter dormancy, stop fertilizing them 35-

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.wikihow.com/Fertilize-Roses

A bad witch’s blog: Craft: Witchcraft, Wands and Wild Roses by Badwitch

Craft: Witchcraft, Wands and Wild Roses

I love wild roses. One seeded naturally in my back garden and grew along the fence between it and that of the house next door. It was a dog rose, the most abundant wild rose that grows in England.

It has simple, pale pink blooms with five petal as well as sharp thorns along the stems. Although all roses symbolise love, for me the dog rose also symbolises the wildness of nature, which can be both beautiful and cruel. I was pleased that a wild rose was thriving in my garden, I happily let it climb along the fence and I delighted in its brief flowering every summer.

But early this spring my neighbour cut it down. We had had an argument about the fence, which had been damaged in a storm, about who should fix it. After the argument my neighbour spent the day taking down the remaining panels and posts of the fence – and took a machete to my rose that was clinging to it. I didn’t say anything further to the

READ MORE HERE:

http://www.badwitch.co.uk/2016/06/craft-witchcraft-wands-and-wild-roses.html?m=1