Why Won’t My Dog Eat His Food? What to Do About Picky Eaters By Jennifer Kvamme, DVM

Most dogs will eat anything and everything without a moment’s hesitation. On the other hand, there are a few dogs who just don’t show that much enthusiasm for food when it’s put in front of them. It can be concerning when your dog doesn’t show interest in his food, turns his nose up, and walks away. Here are a few reasons why this might happen and what to do to help your dog get the nutrition he needs to maintain health.

 

Make Sure Your Dog is Healthy

 

The first thing you need to avoid saying “my dog won’t eat” is to make sure of is that your dog is in good general health. If your dog has always been a good eater and suddenly develops a diminished appetite, this is something to be concerned about immediately. If he has lost weight recently or develops vomiting or diarrhea as well, it is time to make a visit to the veterinarian.

 

Problems with teeth and/or problems in the mouth can make eating difficult for even the hungriest of dogs. Check the mouth for sores, growths, bad teeth or foreign objects that might be causing pain or discomfort for your dog. This would be another cause to visit the veterinarian for an examination. Once any problems have been diagnosed and treated, your dog’s appetite should return quickly.

 

Dog Food Preferences and Bad Habits

 

If health problems are not an issue, you might need to consider that your dog has acquired some bad habits by his owners. Feeding your dog extra treats during the day that are tastier and more

READ MORE:  https://www.petmd.com/dog/nutrition/evr_dg_why-wont-my-dog-eat-his-dog-food

 

 

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What Age Should You Spay Your Dog? By Jessica Vogelsang, DVM

New puppy visits have to be one of my favorite appointments in veterinary medicine. Adorable puppies, excited owners, so many opportunities to lay the groundwork for a long and happy life together. We cover lots of topics: vaccinations, deworming schedules, training, nutrition. During the first visit, one of the most common questions I get with puppies is, “When should my pet be spayed or neutered?”

For a very long time, veterinary medicine offered a fairly standard response: Six months. But why is that? Is it truly in every pet’s best interests to be desexed, and if so, why this particular age? Let’s unpack this very important topic so that you understand the factors we consider when we give you our recommendation for spays and neuters.

Understand Exactly What a Spay or Neuter Entails

spay, known in veterinary parlance as ovariohysterectomy, is the surgical removal of both the ovaries and the uterus in female dogs. While ovariectomies (removal of the ovaries, leaving the uterus) are becoming more common in other parts of the world, the complete ovariohysterectomy is still the main procedure taught and performed in the United States. In the dog, the ovaries are up near the kidneys, and the y-shaped uterus extends from both ovaries down to the cervix. An ovariohysterectomy is a major abdominal surgery that carries with it, like all surgeries, risk and benefit.

A neuter procedure, or castration, removes the testicles from a male dog. Unless the dog has a retained testicle (a condition known as cryptorchidism), a neuter procedure does not enter the abdominal cavity. While still a major surgery, it is not as complex as a spay in a healthy, normal male dog.

The Size of the Pet Matters

A main reason veterinarians recommend a spay at six months as opposed to six weeks is concern for anesthesia. Very small pets can be more of a challenge in terms of temperature regulation and anesthetic safety, though with today’s advanced protocols, we can very safely and successfully anesthetize even tiny pediatric patients. In a shelter environment, where highly trained and experienced staff perform thousands of pediatric spays and neuters a year, it is not uncommon to perform these procedures in pets closer to

READ MORE:  https://www.petmd.com/dog/general-health/what-age-should-you-spay-your-dog

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