Witches ointment BY VAMZZZ

Witches ointment is an ointment or paste with which people (mostly women known as witches) are said to have rubbed themselves in order to fly to the witches sabbath in the late Middle Ages and at the time of the early modern witch persecutions.

witches ointment

 

The ointment is known by a wide variety of names, including witches’ flying ointmentgreen ointmentmagic salve, or lycanthropic ointment. In German it was Hexensalbe (witch salve) or Flugsalbe (flying salve). In Holland, vliegzalf (flying salve) or heksenzalf (witches’ ointment). Latin names included unguentum sabbati (sabbath unguent), unguentum pharelisunguentum populi (poplar unguent) or unguenta somnifera (sleeping unguent).

young basque witch rubbing flying ointment

Witch ointments are ointment preparations made from psychoactive substances (especially from nightshade plants), the use of which can cause hallucinations or delusional dreams. To stigmatize “witches” as evil and demonic the “fat of children” is regularly mentioned by those who led the burning times to its horror climax.

The misogyne psychopath Heinrich Kramer (Institoris) describes in 1486 in the second part of his infamous Malleus Maleficarum (Hexenhammer, Hammer of the Witches) that witches could rise in the air because of an ointment made from children’s extremities. Even Francis Bacon listed as the ingredients of the witches ointment “the fat of children digged out of their graves, juices of smallage, wolfe-bane, and cinque foil, mingled with the meal of fine wheat.”

 

Highly toxic ingredients

Typical poisonous ingredients included belladonna or nightshade, henbane bell, jimson weed (Datura stramonium), black henbane, mandrake, hemlock, and/or wolfsbane, most of which contain atropine, hyoscyamine, and/or scopolamine. Scopolamine can cause psychotropic effects when absorbed through the skin.

Apart from these herbs mushrooms like the Amanita muscaria, commonly known as the fly agaric or fly amanita and ergot or the poison of toads (bufotenin) were used to trigger psychotropic effects, like out of body experiences, seeing Elemental and nature spirits, flying through the air or intense orgasms. Pigs fat was used instead of childrens’ fat.

In the ages these ointments were used frequently they made many casualties because of their toxicity and the problem that it is very difficult to estimate how much of the active psychotropic substance a herb contains. This differs due to ground quality, time of the year, weather, condition of the plant, moment of picking etc.. Even in modern times experimenting with these ointments can be fatal. The German historian, occultist and theosophist Carl Kiesewetter for exemple, author of Geschichte des Neueren Occultismus 1892 and Die Geheimwissenschaften, eine Kulturgeschichte der Esoterik 1895 died while testing an witches ointment recipe on himself.

To make a long story short: experimenting with witch ointment herbs is NOT advisable!

poppy witches ointment

One possible key to how individuals dealt with the toxicity of the nightshades usually said to be part of flying ointments is through the supposed antidotal reaction some of the solanaceous alkaloids have with the alkaloids of Papaver somniferum (opium poppy). This is discussed by Alexander Kuklin in his brief book, How Do Witches Fly? (DNA Press, 1999).

This antagonism was claimed to exist by the movement of Eclectic medicine. For instance,

 

READ MORE HERE:  https://vamzzz.com/blog/witches-ointment/

Dragon’s blood is not a magical concoction but a real ingredient in medicine, incense, and more. By Magda Origjanska

The so-called modern pagans frequently come upon “dragon’s blood” as one of the ingredients needed for their rituals. The name of this substance signifies the blood of a mythical, flying creature that, according to many stories, performs wonders and heals even the sorest of wounds and most grievous illnesses. Surprisingly, dragon’s blood is not only “real” but also has been used since ancient times as varnish, medicine, incense, and dye.

In some medieval encyclopedias, dragon’s blood is mentioned as the actual blood of dragons or elephants who perished in mortal combat.

In reality, dragon’s blood is actually a resin harvested from various plant species such as Croton, Dracaena, Daemonorops, Calamus rotang, and Pterocarpus. Its main feature is the red pigment that lends it the name dragon’s blood.

According to the book “Modern Herbal” by Maud Grieve, published in 1931, “The berries are the size of a cherry and pointed. When ripe they are covered with a reddish, resinous substance which is separated in several ways, the most satisfactory being by steaming, or by shaking or rubbing in coarse, canvas bags. An inferior kind is obtained by boiling the fruits to obtain a decoction after they have undergone the second process. The product may come to market in beads, joined as if forming a necklace, and covered with leaves … or in small, round sticks about 18 inches long, packed in leaves and strips of cane. Other varieties are found in irregular lumps, or in a reddish powder. They are known as lump, stick, reed, tear, or saucer Dragon’s Blood.”

Dracaena draco leaves showing dragon’s blood pigment at the base. The red pigment, called “dragon’s blood,” is said to have been used on Stradivarius violins. Photographed in the gardens of Lotusland—in Montecito, near Santa Barbara in southern California. Author: Sharktopus. CC BY-SA 3.0

Historical records of the Romans and Greeks also note Dracaena cinnabari, a byproduct of the cinnabar tree that was found on an island in the Indian Ocean. The resin of Dracaena species, the “authentic” dragon’s blood, and the extremely poisonous mineral cinnabar (mercury sulfide) were often confused by the ancient Romans. The types of dragon’s blood derived from different species were also hardly distinguished from one another in ancient China.

Dragon’s blood, powdered pigment or apothecary’s grade and roughly crushed incense. Author: Andy Dingley CC BY-SA 3.0

The pigment in the tree’s gum has numerous uses, including as a dye and also as a colorant in cosmetics. Some women used the powder in a ritual that was supposed to attract a marriage proposal. They would write their lover’s name on a tiny piece of paper, then their own name on the top, sprinkle it with some dragon’s blood, and fold it. Afterwards, they threw it onto burning charcoal while saying a prayer.

Dragon’s Blood Tree Author Rod Waddington. CC by 2.0

In the 18th century, dragon’s blood was used as a varnish for Italian violin makers. Moreover, there was a recipe for a toothpaste containing dragon’s blood. In India, it has been used in ceremonies for face painting or as a red varnish for wooden furniture. Another use of it was coloring the surface of writing paper, especially the decorative type that was used for weddings and during Chinese New Year.

In New Orleans voodoo and American hoodoo folk magic, it is used for attracting money or love and often as an incense that cleanses space and casts away negative energies. It is also added to ink to make “dragon’s blood ink,” a substance used to inscribe magical seals and talismans.

Dragon’s blood from Dracaena cinnabari. Sanguis draconis, Dracaena cinnabari. Author: Maša Sinreih in Valentina Vivod. CC BY-SA 3.0

The vibrant red color explains why dragon’s blood refers to the element of fire, and it’s often used in rituals that involve fire, heat, or power. In some traditions of folk magic, the resin is blended until it turns to oil. The oil of dragon’s blood is then applied to one’s wrists in order to

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/03/09/dragons-blood-2/

The plant that can kill and cure

Belladonna, or deadly nightshade

Nightshades have a deadly reputation but these plants, steeped in myth and folklore, have been used for thousands of years for medicinal purposes. And they may have properties that could keep us healthy today, writes Mary Colwell.

“J K Rowling was extremely good at botany, and one of the plants she put into Harry Potter was mandrake,” says Sandy Knapp, head of the Plants Division at the Natural History Museum in London.

In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Prof Sprout shows Harry and his classmates how to repot young mandrakes, but not without everyone wearing earmuffs.

“The cry of the mandrake is fatal to anyone who hears it,” says Hermione, showing off her knowledge to the class. But the students are dealing with young plants which are not quite so dangerous. Prof Sprout points out that as they are “only seedlings, their cries won’t kill yet… but they will knock you out for several hours”.

The pupils cover their ears and Harry pulls a mandrake out of its pot. “Instead of roots, a small, muddy and extremely ugly baby popped out… He had pale green mottled skin, and was clearly bawling at the top of his lungs.”

The scene is based on a medieval myth – it was believed that when pulled from the ground the root emitted a shrill cry that drove people mad and killed them.

Mandrake - illustration from a copy of 'De Materia Medica' by the Greek physician Dioscorides made in 1460Image copyrightSCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY
Image captionAn illustration from De Materia Medica by the Greek physician Dioscorides, made in 1460

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The plant also features in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet: “What with loathsome smells, And shrieks like mandrakes torn out of the earth, That living mortals, hearing them, run mad.”

Herbalists who wanted to use mandrake were advised to plug their ears, tie the plant to a dog and place some meat out of reach – then when the dog ran to the meat it would pull the screaming root out of the soil. The dog would die, but the herbalist would get the mandrake safely.

READ MORE HERE: https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-33506081