Happiness & Beauty from my friend, Frauka

Greetings my Arising Soul Family! Be sure to turn up the volume and enjoy!

Wishing you understanding balance and peace,

the Silver Sage of NewFound-Life.com

❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vegetable seeds to sow in March By BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine

There are lots of vegetable crops that can be sown in March, when the days are beginning to lengthen and become warmer.

Some crops, such as chillies and tomatoes, need to be sown early in the year in order to give them the long growing season that they need. Others, such as fast-growing beetroot and salads can be started off early so that you can enjoy them in late spring and early summer – keep sowing them to extend the harvest.

Tender crops like aubergines need to be sown under glass, either in a greenhouse or on a sunny windowsill. Hardier crops like beetroot and broad beans can be sown directly into the ground outdoors; do not sow if the ground is frosty or covered in snow.

Find out which crops you can sow in March, below.


Aubergines, chillies and tomatoes

In the unpredictable British climate, tomatoes, chillies and aubergines need a long growing season in order to produce a good crop – so start them off early. Sow under glass for the best results.

98496-3

Broad beans

Broad beans are a welcome crop in early summer, and can be sown outdoors in March. Watch out for blackfly as the plants grow – pinch out the growing tip, where they congregate.

98500-3

8 Benefits and Uses of Witch Hazel by Rachael Link, MS, RD

Witch hazel is a plant with powerful medicinal properties that can be used in a variety of ways.

There are many species of witch hazel, but Hamamelis virginiana — a type of shrub native to North America — is most commonly used in folk medicine in the US. The leaves and bark are made into teas and ointments.

Most often applied to the skin and scalp, witch hazel is widely known for its ability to ease inflammation and soothe sensitive skin.

It can also be added to herbal teas and ingested orally in small amounts as a natural treatment for other conditions.

Here are the top 8 benefits and uses of witch hazel.

1. Relieves Inflammation

Inflammation is a normal immune response designed to protect your body against injury and infection.

However, chronic inflammation is thought to play a central role in the development of certain diseases (1Trusted Source).

Witch hazel contains many compounds with potent anti-inflammatory properties, including gallic acid and tannins.

It also contains antioxidants that help prevent widespread inflammation and neutralize free radicals, which are disease-causing compounds that can build up in your body (2Trusted Source3Trusted Source).

Therefore, witch hazel could have far-reaching benefits and may be useful in the treatment of inflammatory-related issues, such as acne, eczema or psoriasis.

Studies show that topically-applied witch hazel can effectively reduce inflammation and help soothe your skin (4Trusted Source5Trusted Source).

Shop for witch hazel online.

SUMMARYWitch hazel contains many compounds with anti-inflammatory properties, which may have far-reaching benefits for your health.

2. Reduces Skin Irritation

Sensitive skin, defined by abnormal sensory symptoms, is a very common condition, affecting an estimate of up to 45% of Americans (6Trusted Source).

Some research suggests that applying witch hazel topically to sensitive skin may be beneficial in the treatment of inflamed, irritated or broken skin.

In fact, witch hazel has been shown to suppress erythema — a reddening

READ MORE HERE: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/witch-hazel-benefits-uses

Poinsettia: History and Tradition of the Christmas Flower

By FloraQueen

For some reason, Christmas isn’t always imagined as a time for flowers. Due to the December cold, many flowers don’t bloom outside and we tend to put more focus on winter foliage like pine, mistletoe and holly. However, there’s one big exception when it comes to Christmas flowers in the shape of the humble poinsettia.

Now in terms of definition, we are cheating a little as the poinsettia is not really a flower, but is instead a red-topped plant. However, it still manages to

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.floraqueen.com/blog/poinsettia-christmas-flower

A bad witch’s blog: Craft: Witchcraft, Wands and Wild Roses by Badwitch

Craft: Witchcraft, Wands and Wild Roses

I love wild roses. One seeded naturally in my back garden and grew along the fence between it and that of the house next door. It was a dog rose, the most abundant wild rose that grows in England.

It has simple, pale pink blooms with five petal as well as sharp thorns along the stems. Although all roses symbolise love, for me the dog rose also symbolises the wildness of nature, which can be both beautiful and cruel. I was pleased that a wild rose was thriving in my garden, I happily let it climb along the fence and I delighted in its brief flowering every summer.

But early this spring my neighbour cut it down. We had had an argument about the fence, which had been damaged in a storm, about who should fix it. After the argument my neighbour spent the day taking down the remaining panels and posts of the fence – and took a machete to my rose that was clinging to it. I didn’t say anything further to the

READ MORE HERE:

http://www.badwitch.co.uk/2016/06/craft-witchcraft-wands-and-wild-roses.html?m=1

BBC – Earth – Why do leaves change colour in autumn? By Chris Packham

The glory of autumn explained: Chris Packham reveals why leaves change from greens to reds and golden yellows.

The spectacle of green leaves turning rich reds and yellows in autumn happens when trees have taken all the food they can from the leaves that are filled with chlorophyll – the biomolecule that absorbs energy from sunlight and gives leaves their green colour.

When sunlight wanes and leaves stop making food, this green pigment is broken down into colourless compounds. Yellow pigments are then revealed and other chemical changes cause red colouration.

Enjoy the splendour of this wonderful transition of the seasons in this video.