History of Friday the 13th

Long considered a harbinger of bad luck, Friday the 13th has inspired a late 19th-century secret society, an early 20th-century novel, a horror film franchise and not one but two unwieldy terms—paraskavedekatriaphobia and friggatriskaidekaphobia—that describe fear of this supposedly unlucky day.

The Fear of 13

Just like walking under a ladder, crossing paths with a black cat or breaking a mirror, many people hold fast to the belief that Friday the 13th brings bad luck. Though it’s uncertain exactly when this particular tradition began, negative superstitions have swirled around the number 13 for centuries.

While Western cultures have historically associated the number 12 with completeness (there are 12 days of Christmas, 12 months and zodiac signs, 12 labors of Hercules, 12 gods of Olympus and 12 tribes of Israel, just to name a few examples), its successor 13 has a long history as a sign of bad luck.

The ancient Code of Hammurabi, for example, reportedly omitted a 13th law from its list of legal rules. Though this was probably a clerical error, superstitious people sometimes point to this as proof of 13’s longstanding negative associations.

Fear of the number 13 has even earned a psychological term: triskaidekaphobia.

Why is Friday the 13th Unlucky?

According to biblical tradition, 13 guests attended the Last Supper, held on Maundy Thursday, including Jesus and his 12 apostles (one of whom, Judas, betrayed him). The next day, of course, was Good Friday, the day of Jesus’ crucifixion.

The seating arrangement at the Last Supper is believed to have given rise to a longstanding Christian superstition that having 13 guests at a table was a bad omen—specifically, that it was courting death.

Though Friday’s negative associations are weaker, some have suggested they also have roots in Christian tradition: Just as Jesus was crucified on a Friday, Friday was also said to be the day Eve gave Adam the fateful apple from the Tree of Knowledge, as well as the day Cain killed his brother, Abel.

The Thirteen Club

In the late-19th century, a New Yorker named Captain William Fowler (1827-1897) sought to remove the enduring stigma surrounding the number 13—and particularly the unwritten rule about not having 13 guests at a dinner table—by founding an exclusive society called the Thirteen Club.

The group dined regularly on the 13th day of the month in room 13 of the Knickerbocker Cottage, a popular watering hole Fowler owned from 1863 to 1883. Before sitting down for a 13-course dinner, members would pass beneath a ladder and a banner reading “Morituri te Salutamus,” Latin for “Those of us who are about to die salute you.”

Four former U.S. presidents (Chester A. ArthurGrover ClevelandBenjamin Harrison and Theodore Roosevelt) would join the Thirteen Club’s ranks at one time or another.

Friday the 13th in Pop Culture

An important milestone in the history of the Friday the 13th legend in particular (not just the number 13) occurred in 1907, with the publication of the novel Friday, the Thirteenth written by Thomas William Lawson.

The book told the story of a New York City stockbroker who plays on superstitions about the date to create chaos on Wall Street, and make a killing on the market.

The horror movie Friday the 13th, released in 1980, introduced the world to a hockey mask-wearing killer named Jason, and is perhaps the best-known example of the famous superstition in pop culture history. The movie spawned multiple sequels, as well as comic books, novellas, video games, related merchandise and countless terrifying Halloween costumes.

What bad things happened on Friday 13th?

On Friday, October 13, 1307, officers of King Philip IV of France arrested hundreds of the Knights Templar, a powerful religious and military order formed in the 12th century for the defense of the Holy Land.

Imprisoned on charges of various illegal behaviors (but really because the king wanted access to their financial resources), many Templars were later executed. Some cite the link with the Templars as the origin of the Friday the 13th superstition, but like many legends involving the Templars and their history, the truth remains murky.

In more recent times, a number of traumatic events have occurred on Friday the 13th, including the German bombing of Buckingham Palace(September 1940); the murder of Kitty Genovese in Queens, New York (March 1964); a cyclone that killed more than 300,000 people in Bangladesh (November 1970); the disappearance of a Chilean Air Force plane in the Andes (October 1972); the death of rapper Tupac Shakur (September 1996) and the crash of the Costa Concordia cruise ship off the coast of Italy, which killed 30 people (January 2012).

Sources

“The Origins of Unlucky Friday the 13th,” Live Science.
“Friday the 13th: why is it unlucky and other facts about the worst day in the calendar,” The Telegraph.
“13 Freaky Things That Happened on Friday the 13th,” Live Science.
“Here’s Why Friday the 13th is Considered Unlucky,” Time.
“Friggatriskaidekaphobes Need Not Apply,” New-York Historical Society.

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There’s a Full Moon Due on Friday the 13th for Most of the U.S. The Next One Isn’t for Another 30 Years

Time Magazine September 12, 2019

BY GINA MARTINEZ

The next full moon is set to make an appearance on the most ominous date on the calendar this month.

A September full moon, also known as a “Harvest Moon,” will be visible to many Americans this Friday the 13th.

According to NASA, the moon will be full early Saturday morning, Sept. 14, at 12:33 a.m. EST, but for those who live in the Central, Mountain and Pacific time zones, the full moon will be visible shortly before midnight on Friday the 13th.

NASA says that the moon will appear full for about three days centered around this time — from Thursday night through Sunday morning.

To read the rest Friday 13, 2019

Crystals for Love and Relationships

Are you interested in learning about crystals which can help you with your love life? These crystals are not only pretty to look at, they are known to help in all matters of emotion!

Ruby

The Ruby’s connection with love goes back to ancient history. Egyptians believed it was the stone of love. This beautiful gem’s use in crowns and regalia show its association with royalty; “love rules”. Fidelity has been a part of the Ruby’s influence, and the 40th wedding anniversary is the “Ruby Anniversary.” Love’s appreciation as a higher emotion aligns with the Ruby. It is said that a ruby will darken if an unfaithful lover comes near. The stone of the Root Chakra, the Ruby is also associated with sensual pleasures and physical passion. Wearing a ruby can increase sexual attraction.

Rose Quartz

Rose quartz beads have been dated back to the Mesopotamian culture, over 7,000 years ago. Considered by many to be the ultimate stone of love, the soft pink color and delicate beauty of rose quartz mirrors the delicate strength of love itself. Sometimes called the “love stone”, the color matches the aura given off by the heart Chakra. Wearing Rose Quartz jewelry can help bring healing and appropriate self-love. Meditating with Rose Quartz helps to instill calm and peacefulness. Carry a piece with you to help mend a broken heart and encourage gentle emotional healing.

Emerald

This brilliant green gem has a long history with mankind. The emerald held an honored place in Egypt, aligned with both Horus and Isis. The ancient Greeks believed it was emblematic of the Goddess Artemis and was believed to help ease pain during childbirth. This stone, the color of the Heart Chakra, was once thought to lose its color or turn a mottled brown if a partner was cheating or unfaithful. Giving an emerald to the one you love is believed to ward away lustful thoughts. Emeralds symbolize psychic powers and the connection between those who share true love.

Green Jade…

To read the rest click here Crystals

Goddess Knowledge – Lady of the Lake

As in many traditions in which a goddess bestows kingship, a mysterious Celtic goddess, gave King Arthur the sword Excalibur and thus established his power and his right to be king. Before he died, Arthur restored the sword her, and it now remains with her beneath the waters deep.

Water, the source of all life, has long been the domain of the goddess. Lakes representing the source of creative power and the land of the dead, life-giving and death or renewal being the two main functions of the goddess. Water indicates both consciousness and revelation. The Lady of the Lake is a guide to the mysterious realms of emotion and renewal, a source of immense creativity. She can give us the energy we need to rule our lives.

 

The Magic of the Pentacle – What is a Pentacle?

There is a lot of confusion about the simple pentacle – what it is, what it means, and how it is used in Wicca.

What is a Pentagram vs a Pentacle?

Often used interchangeably, there actually is a difference between the two terms: Pentagram and Pentacle.

A pentagram is a 5 pointed star and literally means “five lines” from the Greek word pentagrammos. It is a geometric shape and by itself, can really just be a star though can take on spiritual meaning depending on your path and the context in which it is used.

the pentacle is a major symbol of wicca and witchcraftThe pentacle is a pentagram surrounded by a circle. While thought by some to be a New Age or Neo-Pagan symbol, the pentacle is actually a very ancient design. It is the pentacle which actually takes on the most meaning in Wicca, Witchcraft and other Pagan spiritual practices and has various meanings depending on the tradition and way it is used.

For the sake of clarity, the Pentacle will be the focus of the rest of this article.

What does the Pentacle Mean?

This is an area for sometimes heated debate as the pentacle has been misunderstood and misrepresented for some time. Part of the confusion comes from the fact there is no one correct meaning of the pentacle. Like most ancient symbols, it has represented various concepts thru the years and been adapted and adopted by multiple spiritual traditions. Also like most things in Wicca, there is no right or wrong answer – you are free to decide what it means to you or the particular branch of Wicca/Paganism you follow.

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.allwicca.com/blog/magic-of-pentacle-pentagram-wicca-witchcraft

Days of the Week & Norse Gods BY: ThrivingViking

Hey everyone. Thriving Viking here! Welcome to my first post! (Yay!!!) Today I’m going to talk about some viking stuff. Little bits and pieces that you may not know about your modern world. The vikings had such an influence on our modern world and a lot of people don’t even realize it.

Days of the Week

Surprised? Don’t be. The gods of the vikings were able to survive Christianity in their smaller communities and enclaves and even within the borders of the Holy Church. They are the roots of most of the days of the week! So lets start with two of the more well known gods; Odin and Thor. “But there’s no days with their names in them!” You’re protesting. Don’t be so sure. Lets start with Odin…
Odin, the chief god of Asgard has many names. Like literally hundreds! The lore on him is extensive and changes with each dialect of European language. His day of the week is Wednesday. How do you get that from Odin…? Like this: Among the differing names, based on language, one of his names is Wotan or Woden. Does that look a bit closer?
Now we look at Thor. He’s a bit of a hothead and he got stuck with Thursday. Yep, that day when we’re all done with this week and just want Friday to fly by. Thor and Thursday already look pretty close. Now I’m going to bring the runes into it, those 24 angular characters that adorn all manner of viking and pagan art. The rune associated with Thor is Thurs. How about that! Damn near identical, eh?
Right now, you’re asking how these got by the church. Especially when they set up the calendar! Well, imagine you’re trying to integrate an entire culture into your civilization and the direct means are a bit…bloody? So instead you artfully integrate pieces of their culture into yours. Over the years they come around and join you, no war, no blood.
So, where were we… Friday! Surprise, this one’s viking too but, there is some question as to which goddess its attributed to. Frigga or Freya… I’m of the opinion (yours may differ) that its Freya as she is the goddess of magic, sex and

READ MORE:  https://thrivingviking.co/the-days-of-our-week-named-for-norse-gods/

 

 

 

 

 

Continue reading “Days of the Week & Norse Gods BY: ThrivingViking”

Tea Talk Thursday 1 Aug 2019 By: The Silver Sage Witch (Victoria) :-)

Oh my Goddess! It’s time for another episode of Tea Talk Thursday! PLUS new music from a NEW ARTIST!
PLEASE: Subscribe, Watch, Like, and Shaaaaare. Thanks!