These 6 Fruits Treat Cold and Flu Better Than Medicines by Onlymyhealth Staff Writer

These 6 Fruits Treat Cold and Flu Better Than Medicines

Certain fruits carry high amounts of vitamins and other necessary nutrients which help you fight irritating cold and flu. If your diet consists of any these fruits, running nose and all the other symptoms of flu will not stick around you

Fruits carry germ-killing properties and can effectively boost immune system. Loaded with vitamins, fruits maintain a high level of immunity letting your body keep cold and flu at bay. Besides, consuming foods regularly can reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer. Fruit also gives your body the required dietary supplements to fight the antibodies leading to ailments. Conditions like cold and flu can be very well addressed by eating the right fruit type. Now, don’t just blindly resort to medicines for the treatment of cold and flu. Here are six fruits which can help you ward off all the symptoms of cold and flu.

Apples

As we say, an apple a day, keeps the doctor away. This proverb stands true as apples are the most common source of antioxidants. One single apple carries the antioxidant effect of 1,500 mg vitamin C. Loaded with protective flavonoids, apples can prevent heart disease and cancer and also gives the required glow to the skin. It is also keeps the body healthy and protected from virus causing cold and flu.

Also read: 5 Biggest Salad Mistakes That We Need to Stop Making Now

Papayas

Carrying 250 percent of RDA of vitamin C, a papaya can keep cold and flu at bay. The beta-carotene and vitamin C and E found in papayas reduce inflammation throughout the body, eventually reducing the effects of asthma, cold and cough. This fruit also works wonders for the skin and is effective to fight dark circles.

Cranberries

Cranberries carry more antioxidants than any other fruit or vegetable. A one-time serving of this fruit has the benefits of five times the amount of broccoli. A natural probiotic, cranberries can boost the level of good bacteria in the gut and protect it from foodborne diseases. It also helps in keeping virus at bay, reducing the chances of cold and flu. Cranberries can be included in diet in the form of shakes or even as a whole fruit.

Also read: Diet for Hypertension: Summer fruits which help you treat high blood pressure

Grapefruit

Natural compounds called limonoids can be found in grapefruit. These are responsible for lowering cholesterol levels. A rich source of vitamin C, grapefruit can fight the substance lycopene. It helps in keeping the digestive system healthy and gives the required nutrients for a proper digestion system. IT also helps in reducing fever symptoms in the body, giving the much-needed nutrients to fight diseases. Also, this wonder fruit helps giving the much-needed energy to the body to fight fatigue and ill-health.

Bananas

One of the richest sources of vitamin B6, bananas can reduce fatigue, depression, stress and insomnia. It can also keep sudden hunger pangs at bay. Just one banana can lift your mood and reduce the hunger level, without adding much to the

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.onlymyhealth.com/these-6-fruits-treat-cold-and-flu-better-than-medicines-1425712376

Flu Shot Side Effects And Misconceptions, According To Doctors BY SARAH BRADLEY AND CASSIE SHORTSLEEVE

Cold and flu treatment set. Pills, throat spray, thermometer, cup of tea with lemon on simple yellow background. Health care therapy. Flat lay, top view.

Definitely don’t mean to sound like your mom here, but…did you get your flu shot last year? Follow-up question: Have you gotten yours this year?

Just asking because, you know, the flu can be deadly. Up to 61,200 people died from it last season alone (between October 2018 and May 2019), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Just as a baseline, the flu can cause 12,000 deaths per year during a mild season, and anything over 56,000 deaths per year is considered a more severe bout, per the CDC. Eek.

What’s more: Experts are predicting that this year’s 2019-2020 flu season will be pretty bad, reports The New York Times, based on a recent flu outbreak in Australia, which can sometimes predict what the flu virus will be like in the U.S.

In 2017, Australia had its worst outbreak in 20 years, and the 2017-2018 flu season in the United States (which comes

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.womenshealthmag.com/health/a18708943/flu-shot-side-effects/

Dragon’s blood is not a magical concoction but a real ingredient in medicine, incense, and more. By Magda Origjanska

The so-called modern pagans frequently come upon “dragon’s blood” as one of the ingredients needed for their rituals. The name of this substance signifies the blood of a mythical, flying creature that, according to many stories, performs wonders and heals even the sorest of wounds and most grievous illnesses. Surprisingly, dragon’s blood is not only “real” but also has been used since ancient times as varnish, medicine, incense, and dye.

In some medieval encyclopedias, dragon’s blood is mentioned as the actual blood of dragons or elephants who perished in mortal combat.

In reality, dragon’s blood is actually a resin harvested from various plant species such as Croton, Dracaena, Daemonorops, Calamus rotang, and Pterocarpus. Its main feature is the red pigment that lends it the name dragon’s blood.

According to the book “Modern Herbal” by Maud Grieve, published in 1931, “The berries are the size of a cherry and pointed. When ripe they are covered with a reddish, resinous substance which is separated in several ways, the most satisfactory being by steaming, or by shaking or rubbing in coarse, canvas bags. An inferior kind is obtained by boiling the fruits to obtain a decoction after they have undergone the second process. The product may come to market in beads, joined as if forming a necklace, and covered with leaves … or in small, round sticks about 18 inches long, packed in leaves and strips of cane. Other varieties are found in irregular lumps, or in a reddish powder. They are known as lump, stick, reed, tear, or saucer Dragon’s Blood.”

Dracaena draco leaves showing dragon’s blood pigment at the base. The red pigment, called “dragon’s blood,” is said to have been used on Stradivarius violins. Photographed in the gardens of Lotusland—in Montecito, near Santa Barbara in southern California. Author: Sharktopus. CC BY-SA 3.0

Historical records of the Romans and Greeks also note Dracaena cinnabari, a byproduct of the cinnabar tree that was found on an island in the Indian Ocean. The resin of Dracaena species, the “authentic” dragon’s blood, and the extremely poisonous mineral cinnabar (mercury sulfide) were often confused by the ancient Romans. The types of dragon’s blood derived from different species were also hardly distinguished from one another in ancient China.

Dragon’s blood, powdered pigment or apothecary’s grade and roughly crushed incense. Author: Andy Dingley CC BY-SA 3.0

The pigment in the tree’s gum has numerous uses, including as a dye and also as a colorant in cosmetics. Some women used the powder in a ritual that was supposed to attract a marriage proposal. They would write their lover’s name on a tiny piece of paper, then their own name on the top, sprinkle it with some dragon’s blood, and fold it. Afterwards, they threw it onto burning charcoal while saying a prayer.

Dragon’s Blood Tree Author Rod Waddington. CC by 2.0

In the 18th century, dragon’s blood was used as a varnish for Italian violin makers. Moreover, there was a recipe for a toothpaste containing dragon’s blood. In India, it has been used in ceremonies for face painting or as a red varnish for wooden furniture. Another use of it was coloring the surface of writing paper, especially the decorative type that was used for weddings and during Chinese New Year.

In New Orleans voodoo and American hoodoo folk magic, it is used for attracting money or love and often as an incense that cleanses space and casts away negative energies. It is also added to ink to make “dragon’s blood ink,” a substance used to inscribe magical seals and talismans.

Dragon’s blood from Dracaena cinnabari. Sanguis draconis, Dracaena cinnabari. Author: Maša Sinreih in Valentina Vivod. CC BY-SA 3.0

The vibrant red color explains why dragon’s blood refers to the element of fire, and it’s often used in rituals that involve fire, heat, or power. In some traditions of folk magic, the resin is blended until it turns to oil. The oil of dragon’s blood is then applied to one’s wrists in order to

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/03/09/dragons-blood-2/