Let’s Face It: There Is No Such Thing as Humane Meat By: Ingrid Newkirk

Looking at online menus for a restaurant to take a visiting friend, I read “humane meat” and had to do a double-take. This bizarre concept, already seen on labels in upscale grocery stores, is invading eateries so that anyone who wishes to order the chicken can feel sort of OK or even really good about it. What are we thinking? That the animals were blown away in the middle of the night while dreaming sweet dreams after a life of comfy straw and the sun on their backs in lush green meadows, like in the fantasy cheese commercials that PETA sued to have removed from the airways, the ones that failed to show the real misery and muck in which California’s dairy cows languish until the truck comes to take them to you-know-where? Or maybe you don’t know where.

One hates to be absolute, but in my view, there is no such thing as humane meat. Perhaps if we were being asked to consider roadkill, which at least would not be cruelly raised or even killed by us (someone else’s non-commissioned vehicle doesn’t count) if we scraped it up off the tarmac and ate it, but that’s not what we are being asked to consider. Rather, it is being suggested that we actually find it acceptable to eat the flesh of animals who were very much alive, had friends and family — or, more likely, were deprived of them — and went through enormous trauma despite some small courtesies, such as perhaps 2 inches of additional space in their jam-packed prison cells. Yes, kicking the dog six times a week instead of seven is marginally better, but that doesn’t mean that we should go around suggesting that people kick the dog, just not as often, does it?

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Calling this sad flesh “humane” is like calling Britney Spears an opera singer. Yes, “Baby One More Time” may be easier on the ear than fingers on a blackboard, but it’s hardly Wagner’s “Ring Cycle,” is it? I could go along with SLCBSU, or “slightly less cruel but still unacceptable,” meat, but it’s definitely still not humane by a long shot.

There’s nothing humane about the flesh of animals who have had one or two or even three improvements made in their singularly rotten lives on today’s factory farms. Perhaps they are allowed outside into a patch of mud if they can fight their way out through the 10,000 other hens competing to get through the hatchway. Perhaps they are allowed to share a box in which to lay their eggs. Perhaps they are not kept in iron maidens or sow stalls in which they can never turn around. But the rest of their lot in life and the manner in which they are otherwise treated outside these reductions in abysmal treatment are still an abomination.

By being asked to support meat from living beings who are marginally less cruelly treated, we are being encouraged to support animal breeders, the people who bring our fellow animals into this world for the sole purpose of putting them through the wringer — causing them stress, trauma and pain — and then, because we’ll pay for those body parts, pronouncing, “Off with their heads!” In asking us to endorse humane meat, we are also being asked to endorse artificial insemination (a hideously terrifying procedure carried out on what farmers themselves call “rape racks”) and to support mutilations such as castration, dewattling, decombing, and ear-punching — all without painkillers. Being asked to support humane meat means being asked to support the suffering of animals in transport, to approve of treatment that causes them palpable fear, their bodies shaking and their eyes wide as saucers, as they are slung by their legs into crates that are slammed onto the back of a truck. And we are being asked to find acceptable and humane their experience of barreling down the highway in the freezing cold and sweltering heat. How can we accept any of that if we are against cruelty to animals? It’s simple — we can’t.

By being asked to endorse this grossly misnamed “humane meat,” we are being asked to endorse the ways in which the animals are killed, the final moments that culminate in the fear and the stench of the slaughterhouse. For most meat is obtained from the slaughterhouse, a place of blood and offal and struggles and screams. If that is so humane, why don’t we take the kids and make a day of it? Because it isn’t humane, that’s why.

All of us in society are supposed to believe that cruelty to animals is wrong and that it is a good thing to prevent needless suffering. So if that is true, how can meat be acceptable under any but the most extraordinary circumstances, such as perhaps roasting the bird who died flying into a window? The pig or hen’s misery

 

READ MORE:  https://www.huffpost.com/entry/humane-meat_b_2765996

 

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The doctor, barrister, civil servant and Cambridge academic who say they have proof there’s an afterlife By: THERESA CHEUNG FOR THE DAILY MAIL

A group of women sit at a table, sipping coffee and talking animatedly. One is a doctor, another a barrister. A third, Jane Clark, 49, is a no-nonsense civil servant — so you might imagine these high-flying women are here to network, or are members of a school PTA.

Yet nothing could be further from the truth. Rather, for the next hour, they will discuss how best to connect with the departed and debate the scientific evidence for the existence of Heaven.

‘We’re not sitting in an old-fashioned gypsy caravan, looking into a glass ball,’ says Jane. ‘We’re all professional, educated women. I work in a team handling large contracts and am the type of person who questions things and looks for evidence. I’m logical and think things through. But I also believe that the human spirit can live on beyond death.’

People have been fascinated by the concept of what lies ‘beyond the grave’ for centuries. While there are those who are sceptical about the existence of an afterlife, many — even if they

READ MORE:  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-5129875/women-believe-prove-theres-life-death.html

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The Importance of Recycling to the Environment. David Nicoll

reduce-reuse-recycle

Usually, recycling means turning used materials labelled as ‘Recyclable’ in a disposer container where these are meant to be taken and reuse as materials for new products. Recyclable products are used as the raw materials for new products. As the number of our natural resources is decreasing day by day and if this continues nothing will be left for our future generation, recycling is the only ways which can help us to meet our daily demands and save the natural resources. Another vital role of recycling is that it will reduce the amount of waste in our environment and help us to keep our surroundings clean.

Is Everything Recyclable?

Maybe not all the materials are recyclable but if you contact with your local recycling centre you will know what you can or cannot recycle. Usually, goods have the recyclable mark on their packaging or some labels to easily find out which recyclable materials are and which are not. But you have to give an extra effort to know whether these disposal containers with recyclable materials are actually going to recycle centre or being dump into the landfill. Because if their ultimate goal is the landfill then, the overall hard work to save the environment will be pointless.

How Recycling Affects the Environment?

Recycling is one of the best and effective ways to keep the environment impregnable. Because only reusing can lower the amount of waste and save the natural resources for future. Less landfill trash can save air and water from polluting. Did you know – If we recycle one aluminium can we will be able to save enough energy to run a TV for 3 hours (Obviously depends on the energy consumption of your TV)? It might sound unbelievable but it’s true. This can give you an idea that how much energy can be saved if we take recycling seriously.

It’s not enough to change the way we act but the way we think to return the world what we have taken from it. A survey shows that approximately 3.5 billion to 7 billion trees are cut down every year worldwide to use the land as a landfill. Another research shows that approximately 50 million tonnes of waste are produced in Australia each year. This landfill problem is a difficult issue to solve but has a powerful impact on environmental pollution.

Recycling will reduce the amount of waste of landfills which is potentially hazardous for

 

READ MORE:  https://www.eartheclipse.com/recycling/importance-recycling-environment.html

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6 May 2019 Angel Card guidance + your oracle card :-)

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Lyme disease

Overview

Lyme disease is caused by four main species of bacteria. Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia mayonii cause Lyme disease in the United States, while Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii are the leading causes in Europe and Asia. The most common tick-borne illness in these regions, Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of an infected black-legged tick, commonly known as a deer tick.

You’re more likely to get Lyme disease if you live or spend time in grassy and heavily wooded areas where ticks carrying Lyme disease thrive. It’s important to take common-sense precautions in tick-infested areas.

Symptoms

The signs and symptoms of Lyme disease vary. They usually appear in stages, but the stages can overlap.

Early signs and symptoms

A small, red bump, similar to the bump of a mosquito bite, often appears at the site of a tick bite or tick removal and resolves over a few days. This normal occurrence doesn’t indicate Lyme disease.

However, these signs and symptoms can occur within a month after you’ve been infected:

  • Rash. From three to 30 days after an infected tick bite, an expanding red area might appear that sometimes clears in the center, forming a bull’s-eye pattern. The rash (erythema migrans) expands slowly over days and can spread to 12 inches (30 centimeters) across. It’s typically not itchy or painful but might feel warm to the touch.

    Erythema migrans is one of the hallmarks of Lyme disease, although not everyone with Lyme disease develops the rash. Some people develop this rash at more than one place on their bodies.

  • Other symptoms       

READ MORE: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lyme-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20374651 Continue reading “Lyme disease”

Yes, I have a disease…

I can’t believe it happened to me! I was in the hospital two weeks long because of it. My fear was incredible! It hurts so badly!

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