10 of the Incredible Benefits of Palo Santo

10 of the Incredible Benefits of Palo Santo

Cleanse Your Energy, Find Calm, Deepen Your Connection to the Earth with Palo Santo Wood

Palo santo is one of the most fragrant woods in the world. Its sweet scent of pine, mint, and lemon has, for centuries, been a harbinger of healing and good fortune. Shamans, saints, and those seeking a stronger spiritual connection with the world use palo santo to protect, experience, and heal. Here are ten of the incredible benefits palo santo offers:

 

1. Spiritual purifying and energy cleansing.

For centuries the indigenous people of the Andes have been using palo santo for spiritual purification and energy cleansing. When the wood is burned it’s believed to clear negative energy and restore tranquility and calm.

Form: wood burning

palo santo yoga

2. Inspiring creativity and bringing love and good fortune.

Burn palo santo sticks or use the charcoal for ritual smudging that will welcome creativity, love, and good fortune into your space. The wood can help brighten energy and promote feelings of positivity and joy. The scent is also shown to reduce stress and anxiety, and enhance clarity and concentration.

Form: wood burning or smudging

3. Bringing a deeper connection to the divine source.

If meditation is the yin, palo santo is the yang. The uplifting scent is the perfect partner for your meditation practice. Raise your vibration, and discover peace and groundedness as you sink into a deeper connection to the Earth and your inner consciousness.

Form: wood burning or smudging

burning palo santo

4. Physical healing.

Palo santo is used to treat a wide variety of physical ailments including colds, flus, anxiety, depression, asthma, bronchitis, headaches, and emotional trauma. Use the oil to provide pain relief for arthritis and joint pain with its anti-inflammatory properties.

Palo santo tea (made by simmering the wood in hot water) acts as a natural digestive aid. The oil can be added to soaps, scrubs, and lotions to cleanse and moisturize the skin. The wood also contains high concentrations of a compound called d-limonene, which is thought to aid in the prevention of a variety of cancers.

Form: simmer the wood to make tea or apply oil as a topical tincture

5. Energetic protection and the removal of negativity.

When used for smudging or burning, palo santo can eliminate negative energy, creating a calmer, more tranquil space. Set an intention about what you want to clear out of your space, then move from corner to corner, removing any bad energy, uplifting your spirit, and filling your home with good fortune.

Form: wood burning or smudging

 

6.  The enticing and clarifying palo santo scent.

Can we wax on a bit here about the remarkable, lasting scent of a palo santo smudge? For our kitchens and bedrooms, vehicles and workspaces, the brightness of citrus, marked with the ancient notes of its natural heritage, bring a uniquely clarifying scent to every space. The benefit of burning palo santo wood in a smudging practice is its lingering scent.

Form: wood burning or smudging 


7. Mobility of use while in travel modes.

Unlike a sage bundle, palo santo wood is graciously proportioned for spiritual seekers who spend ample time away from home. Palo santo sticks are well-paired with car rides, hikes and other travel experiences. People are known to cleanse their hotel rooms before sleep for a more peaceful, deepened rest.

Form: wood burning or smudging

8. Vibrational cleansing and renewal for crystals.

Crystals do much of the heavy lifting in the work

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Top 15 Essential Oils for Depression (And 3 Uplifting Blends) By Up Nature

Essential Oils and Depression

Did you know that at some point in their lives, around 1 in 4 Americans will experience depression? It is estimated that every year over 20 million people suffer from depression in the United States alone, and worldwide the projected figures are at 350 million sufferers.

Let’s face it, we’ve all been hurdled with the blues at some point in our lives but depression is more than just feeling low, and for some it is a severe disorder that they struggle with every day.

If you or someone you know has one or more of the symptoms below it could very well be a signal for depression and getting help:

  • Constant fatigue and tiredness
  • Insomnia or too much sleep
  • Lack of energy
  • Low sex drive
  • Constant melancholy and sadness that you can’t shrug off
  • Feelings of never-ending despair and in severe cases suicidal thoughts
  • Bodily aches and pains
  • Irritability and short-temper
  • Inability to concentrate and focus
  • Overwhelming feelings of being weighed down
  • Sense of hopelessness and negative thinking pattern
  • Lack of confidence and low self esteem
  • Decreased or increased appetite including cravings
  • Anxiety and rapid heartbeat
  • Avoiding going out with friends, social situations, or spending time with family
  • Wanting to stay in bed all day

If you answered yes to one or more of the above then you may have depression or be in a depressive state at this time in your life.

So what are the next steps?

READ MORE:  https://upnature.com/blogs/news/top-15-essential-oils-for-depression-and-3-uplifting-blends

 

 

 

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Glass straws? Straw straws? Here are some eco-friendly alternatives to plastic BY:David Carrig

The war on plastic straws is growing as more companies such as McDonald’s and cites such as New York are facing pressure to find sustainable and eco-friendly alternatives that won’t pollute our oceans, litter our beaches or wind up harming animals.

McDonald’s shareholders on Thursday rejected a proposal that asked the fast-food giant to report on the business risks of using plastic straws and look for alternatives.

Despite the rejection, the fast-food giant  has begun experimenting with using paper straws in its U.K. restaurants and making plastic straws available only on request.

It is estimated that more than 500 million single-use plastic straws are used and thrown away every day in the U.S. alone as Americans use them at an average rate of 1.6 straws per person per day, according to the National Park Service. That translates into 175 billion straws a year.

It’s no wonder sea turtles are being found with plastic straws stuck up their noses.

Only 14% of plastic packaging is collected for recycling, and “a staggering 32% of plastic packaging escapes collection systems,” according to a 2016 study by the World Economic Forum.

A study by the University of California Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) found that 8 million metric tons of plastic trash end up in our oceans every year. That’s equivalent to five grocery bags filled with plastic for every foot of coastline in the world.

Plastic straws are one of the top 10 plastic items found in beach cleanups every year.
Getty Images/iStockphoto

And while plastic straws represent only a fraction of the overall tonnage of ocean plastic, they are less likely to make it into recycling bins, and their small size make them dangerous for marine animals and are consumed by fish.

More: Our trash is harming the deepest fish in the ocean

More: McDonald’s shareholders vote against plastic straw study

This has led environmentalists and conservation groups to add

 

READ MORE:  https://eu.usatoday.com/story/money/nation-now/2018/05/23/sustainable-alternatives-plastic-straws-recyling/632993002/

 

 

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Willow Bark: Nature’s Aspirin

What is willow bark?

Willow bark, the bark of several varieties of willow tree, has been used for centuries as a pain reliever. The active ingredient in the medicine made from willow bark is called salicin.

Some people use willow bark as an alternative to aspirin, particularly those that experience chronic headaches or back pain. Willow bark is also used in some products to aid weight loss.

It comes from the branches of 2- to 3-year-old willow trees. Willow trees and shrubs grow all over the world, except for Australia and Antarctica. The white willow and black willow are two of the most common willows that are used medicinally.

Side effects

When taken in moderation, willow bark does not appear to have negative side effects. The salicin in willow bark converts to salicylic acid. Some believe that this makes it gentler on your stomach than lab-created aspirin. Too much willow bark, however, can cause stomach cramping and bleeding.

Forms and dose of willow bark

Capsules

Willow bark can be purchased from many drugstores and almost any health food store in a powdered, encapsulated form. The recommended dose for pain relief is 240 milligrams a day.

Bark

The active ingredient in willow bark is salicin, but the accompanying flavonoids and plant particles might be part of what make willow bark effective. For this reason, some people prefer to actually chew on the unprocessed bark of the willow tree. It is difficult to determine how much salicin you are getting from each piece of bark, so this method of consumption should be approached with caution.

Liquid

Willow bark can also be found in a distilled tincture form. Taking a drop or two per day for pain relief (up to 2 milliliters) can work as an anti-inflammatory and pain relief substitute for aspirin.

Tea

Some health food stores sell willow bark tea, advertising it as a pain reliever and anti-inflammatory. Steep willow bark tea for

 

READ MORE:  https://www.healthline.com/health/willow-bark-natures-aspirin#forms-and-dose

 

 

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Think You Don’t Need Houseplants? Science Says Different By: Noma Nazish

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Whether it’s a bland living room or boring workspace, potted plants are a safe bet if you want to jazz up interiors on a budget. Interestingly, spending a little green on greens can do wonders for your well-being as well. A significant amount of scientific evidence suggests that being around greenery can stave off stress, elevate mood and improve cognitive function, among other things. ‘Nuff said. Here are five proven reasons you need some houseplants in your life RN:

  • They reduce stress and anxiety. According to a studypublished in the Journal of Physiological Anthropology, active interaction with indoor plants (like touching and smelling) can reduce physiological and psychological stress. What’s more, even the potting soil can help you keep a handle on daily stress and anxiety. This is because soil contains microbes dubbed “outdoorphins” (M. vaccae) which work as natural antidepressants. “It boosts your mood by releasing cytokines, which then leads your brain to produce more serotonin. So, just by being around soil, these outdoorphins flood your body and boost your mood,” writes Joey Doherty, a Certified Wellness Counselor. Although a walk in the park would be more effective (due to increased exposure to those microbes), being around houseplants can be beneficial too. “It has also been established that plants confer positive changes in the brain’s electrical activity, muscle tension and heart activity,” notes environmental health expert Danica-Lea Larcombe, in an articlepublished in The Conversation. Place potted lavender or snake plant in your bedroom to de-stress and sleep better.
  • They spruce up the air quality. According to the American Lung Association, indoor air can be even more polluted than the air outdoors. Some of the most common air pollutants include asbestos, mold, radon, formaldehyde, benzene and carbon monoxide. Exposure to these fine particles can cause dry eyes, headaches or even serious ailments like asthma. According to NASA, plants like Peace Lily and English Ivy can filter out most of these toxic fumes. They absorb these pollutants through their roots and leaves. Research also highlights that rooms with houseplants contain up to 60% less airborne molds and bacteria than rooms without any greenery.
  • They act as 

READ MORE:  https://www.forbes.com/sites/nomanazish/2018/02/10/think-you-dont-need-houseplants-science-says-different/#ee7bd673595a

 

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The Super Superfood You’re Probably Not Eating Five good reasons to add sauerkraut to your diet by Shelley Emling

The Super Superfood You’re Probably Not Eating

Researchers also found that sauerkraut can reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

Is there anything better at a summer barbecue than a hot dog with sauerkraut tucked inside the bun? Not much. And beyond the taste, there also are plenty of healthy reasons to add this fermented cabbage to your diet — not only during the summer, but all year long. Here are just five of them.


 


1. Sauerkraut packs a punch when it comes to vitamins.

Popular throughout Central Europe for centuries, sauerkraut is a great source of vitamin C. And vitamin C — a superstar antioxidant — helps protect the body from stress and free radical damage. Other healthy nutrients in sauerkraut include vitamin K, known for its role in blood clotting, as well as calcium, potassium and phosphorus. An added bonus is that fermentation makes these nutrients easier for your body to absorb.

2. Sauerkraut boosts your digestive system.

Sauerkraut is ripe with probiotic power, or beneficial bacteria that wards off toxins and not-so-beneficial bacteria. In short, probiotics actually feed the good bacteria in your gut, which leads to better digestive health. Probiotics also have been shown to lessen gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation and symptoms associated with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

3. Sauerkraut could help you lose weight.

Like most vegetables, sauerkraut is a low-calorie food with a lot of fiber. As such, it can make you feel fuller for longer, which could help with weight loss. With only 15 calories in two-thirds of a cup, sauerkraut is the perfect snack when you get hungry between meals.

4. Sauerkraut may reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s.

Study after study shows a connection between the health of the gut and the health of the brain. Indeed, recent research out of Lund University in Sweden found that unhealthy intestinal flora could speed up the development of

 

READ MORE:  https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2017/superfood-sauerkraut-health-benefits-fd.html

 

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Is Salt As Bad As Once Thought?

Woman adding too much salt to pizza, is salt as bad as once thought?

Should you avoid salt? Some sources claim it isn’t as bad for your health as once thought. David Trachtenbarg, MD, UnityPoint Health, says having too much salt in your diet is entirely possible, and while you do need some salt in your body, he explains the reasons why watching your salt intake still matters.

What’s Too Much Salt?

On average, Dr. Trachtenbarg says most people consume between 9,000-12,000 milligrams of sodium a day, roughly over three times the recommended amount. He suggests keeping daily sodium levels at 2,300 milligrams maximum, with less than 1,500 milligrams being preferred, especially for adults with high blood pressure.

“For most people, there are no side effects of having too much sodium,” Dr. Trachtenbarg says. “But, that doesn’t mean salt can’t have a negative effect on the body.”

He lists the health impacts of consuming excess sodium:

  • Blood pressure. Eating too much salt is linked to hypertension, or high blood pressure. Reducing salt intake to 5,000-6,000 milligrams per day has shown to lower blood pressure.
  • Heart health. If you have heart disease or congestive heart failure, extra salt can cause fluid retention, which can lead to shortness of breath and hospitalization.
  • Kidney function. If you have kidney disease, too much salt in your diet may cause you to retain fluid, leading to weight gain and bloating.
  • Diabetes. While not directly connected to blood sugar, eating too much salt increases the risk of complications from diabetes.

“Nearly every processed food has added salt,” Dr. Trachtenbarg says. “When eating processed foods, it’s important to look at the amount of sodium listed on the nutrition label.”

How to Reduce Sodium Intake

The simplest way to reduce the amount of salt in your diet is avoiding processed foods and not adding salt to your meal. Dr. Trachtenbarg encourages you to look closely at nutritional labels, staying away from foods with high salt content, like bacon and large pickles.

“Reduced sodium or low-sodium foods can help reduce blood pressure, but foods with close to zero salt are often tasteless. The good news is if you limit salt intake, your body becomes more sensitive to the salt in food. This means many processed foods may become too salty for your taste, and you can enjoy lower sodium foods without missing the flavor,” Dr. Trachtenbarg says.

Other common beliefs about reducing sodium don’t hold as much promise. Dr. Trachtenbarg lists why the following steps don’t balance out salt consumption.

  • Drinking more water. Extra water doesn’t “wash out” the salt. High salt intake can lead to bloating and fluid retention.
  • Sweating it out. There’s about 500 milligrams of salt in a pound of sweat. Normally, only a very few athletic people will sweat a significant amount of salt. Even though exercising in high temperatures produces more sweat and salt, it can also lead to heat stroke, which can be fatal.
  • Using “healthy” salt options. Sea salt is often talked about as being a better sodium option. And, while sea salt does have a different element make-up than salt (sodium chloride), there’s no clear benefit of choosing sea salt over regular table salt.

As for those who say at least salt is better than sugar, Dr. Trachtenbarg says that isn’t

READ MORE: https://www.unitypoint.org/livewell/article.aspx?id=ad2fb339-a297-4b0b-959c-5033c35cc8bb