Watch “Haunted graveyard in hidden Ireland” on YouTube

How to Use Grave Dirt in Pagan Magic and Rituals by Patti Wigington

Hands Holding Soil WIN-Initiative / Getty Images

Mention graveyard dirt in a magical context, and chances are good you’ll get a lot of strange looks or questions. After all, it sounds a bit creepy! Who goes around scooping up soil out of cemeteries?

The use of graveyard dirt isn’t all that odd in some magical traditions. In certain forms of folk magic, for example, the magical connection of the dirt to the deceased person buried beneath it is more significant than its being from a grave. Dirt from the grave of someone you loved can be used in love magic, while dirt from the burial site of a very wicked person might be incorporated into malevolent workings or curses. In other words, grave dirt is a physical object that some believe possesses the traits of the person it was used to bury.

Historical Uses

The use of soil from a graveyard isn’t new. In fact, ancient texts indicate that the ancient Egyptians may have used dirt and other items from funeral sites (such as

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https://www.learnreligions.com/graveyard-dirt-in-magical-workings-2562513

Summit Spirits: What is the difference between a ghost and a spirit? | SummitDaily.com

By
Gail Westwood
Ghosts are tied to the location of their death, usually a sudden or tragic one, and they often don’t realize that they are dead. In most cases, they have unfinished business as the deceased person does not accept the way in which they died.
Courtesy of iStockphoto

We use the word ghost and spirit interchangeably but there really is a strong difference between them. According to the late Hans Holzer, professor of Parapsychology and writer of 119 books on the subject, “Ghosts are similar to psychotic human beings, incapable of reasoning for themselves. … Spirits on the other hand are the surviving personalities of all of us who pass through the door of death in a relatively normal fashion.”

We learn from him that ghosts are tied to the location of their death, usually a sudden or tragic one, and they often don’t realize that they are dead. In most cases, they have “unfinished business” as the deceased person does not accept the way in which they died. The simplest form of unfinished business can be as innocent as a person being attached so strongly to their home that they cannot leave it behind and pass over. They are known as “caretakers” and want to stay to make sure the building is being taken care of properly by future owners and also to their approval. At the end of the scale, unfinished business can take the form of dark energy when a person’s death is extremely violent and unexpected.

Surprisingly, only a small percentage of paranormal sightings are true ghosts. The majority of them are really

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https://www.summitdaily.com/news/summit-spirits-what-is-the-difference-between-a-ghost-and-a-spirit/

What makes graveyards scary? Why graveyards are scary?

Under the wat­chful gaze of crumbling saints and baby-f­aced cherubs, you hurry down a path lined with mausoleums. Eventually, you pass crops of headstones glinting in the moonlight, each engraved with the CliffsNotes version of the dead person’s life. You practically run past sunken graves and dying flowers, hoping upon hope that the sound you hear is just the wind and trying to shake the feeling that something is following close on your heels.

All right, so maybe you’ve never taken a midnight shortcut through the local cemetery. But if you have ever set foot in a graveyard, you’ve likely felt a hint of the fear and uneasiness that is their legacy. Maybe you were attending a family funeral, touring historic graveyards or simply fleeing flying silver spheres and hooded dwarves.

­Whatever your reason for strolling among the tombstones, you probably felt something noteworthy about the experience — something different from all the other spaces and places that fill our lives. After all, graveyards are the final resting place for many of our dead. People say their last goodbyes there, sometimes returning year after year to leave flowers or say a few words.

No matter where you travel in the world, cemeteries frequently are silent and solemn settings. Whether the grounds are finely manicured or left to the weeds, graveyards exist as the place where the living contemplate the mysteries, tra­umas and heartbreaks associated with death.

­But why are so many people afraid of graveyards? Is it the thought of all those decaying bodies under the dirt or the idea of a bony arm emerging from the soil to grab your ankle and pull you into the underworld ? Or is it something deeper? On the next page, we’ll travel to a place full of dark secrets and hidden skeletons: the human brain.

What do cemeteries symbolize?

Cats often receive a bum rap for hanging out in cemeteries, but can we really blame them? After all, graveyards offer great feline amenities: choice napping spots, scratching trees and a generous selection of small animals to prey on. What would an 8-pound (3.6-kg) tabby want with your grandfather’s soul when there are so many squirrels around?

cats in the graveyard
© iStockphoto.com/syntesis
Spooky necropolis or just prime catnapping territory?

­To cats, graveyards may just be another place to sleep away the afternoon, but to humans, they represent the mystery and the outrage of mortality. Like it or not, we’re all going to die. You may think you’ve accepted that fact, but it’s an issue humanity has struggled with for millennia. Unable to avoid it, we’ve tried to figure out what lies beyond its

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How to Honor the Dead – Alma

By T Kira Madden

Here’s a secret: I wear my father’s clothes every day. Not entire outfits, but a garment or two, always. I wear his striped t-shirts to bed at night, his vibrant dress socks under my boots. I’ve tailored his button-up shirts to fit me in the shoulders; I’ve removed a link or two from his bracelets. Yes, I am ashamed to admit, I have even worn his underwear. But that was only once, and, well, I happen to wear Calvin Klein briefs, too. I wear his jade pinky ring on my ring finger, and his army tag necklace never comes off my neck.

I thumb the words: MADDEN, JOHN L, #11500138, JEWISH.

Why the hell does it say Jewish? I asked my mother when she gave me this tag.

Because they had to know how to honor the dead, she replied, in case he died.

My father has been dead for one year five months and 12 days, as I write this. It was his lungs, not the army. I don’t have to check the calendar, or count, because my body knows. Each day, I think, I am not doing grief right. I am wading too slowly through this, or, at moments, too quickly, or not at all. My grief is selfish, my grief is smaller than other griefs, it is unjustified, my time for sadness is up; everybody dies, so it’s absurd to feel this bad, that my situation is unlike all others. Spoiler alert: That is grief talking, and none of this is true.

Every single day since November 2, 2015, I have asked myself that same question: How do I best honor the dead?

Because that army tag was incorrect. My father didn’t want a religious ceremony

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https://www.heyalma.com/how-to-honor-the-dead/

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