10 Terrifying Haunted Castles in Ireland | Rue Morgue

By: MADDI MCGILLVRAY

When one thinks about Ireland they often picture lush green hills, rolling cliffs, and maybe a pint of Guinness or two. But just like any place with a rich history, Ireland has its fair share of hauntings.

With St. Patrick’s Day right around the corner, why not celebrate early by taking a tour through Ireland’s most haunted castles.

1. Leap Castle – Offaly
Considered as one of the most haunted castles in the world, thousands of tourists flock to Leap Castle each year in the hopes that they will run into its former occupants. The castle is said to be haunted by a number of spectres, the most terrifying being a small hunchback creature with a nauseating stench of sulphur and decomposing c

READ MORE HERE:

https://rue-morgue.com/10-terrifying-haunted-castles-in-ireland/

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THE VEIL IS THINNING…ARE YOU READY? By Kimberly McGrath

Have you been extra tired, drained generally not feeling well?  I know I have been.  Yes, I am getting over either a mild flu or a really bad cold, the weather has changed drastically since the Autumnal Equinox a few weeks ago and I really believe that has a effect on our physical bodies.  In addition, astronomers have been saying that we have been having Solar Flares (when the Sun sends of little explosions) and reportedly that has an effect on our energy levels.   Solar winds also blow across the Earth and this electromagnetic energy wakes us up during the night and helps us have crazy dreams.  Have you been having crazy dreams?  I know mine have been off the chain- including the haunting Bird/Duck dream that I had two nights ago and I just cannot seem to shake the symbolism. You are not the only one and a few of my friends even asked me about some of their wild dreams this week and what the symbolism is.

Mostly everyone is dreaming about animals or spirits on the other side.  Well, it is that time of year again, when the Veil between our (physical) world and that of the Other Side becomes so thin that our our loved ones, our Spirit Guides and Animal Totems have much easier access to us and our subconscious and physical existence.  So, if your dreams are wild and you are being woke up in the middle of the night, don’t be surprised if you are having visitations – they will only get stronger leading up to All Hallow’s Eve.  These disturbances usually occur between 2 and 3 a.m. when we are asleep and most relaxed, there is little or no traffic outside, electronics are turned off, the world is quiet and there is no interference.  All Hallow’s Eve or Samhain (pronounced Sawen) is followed by Dia de los Muertos or Day of the Dead, where it is believed that our ancestors come to feast on gifts that we provide for them and some celebrate All Saints Day, where you honor religious saints instead of your ancestors.  Either way, it is our job in the living, to provide offerings – thus the candy that is served to all of the little goblins that come knocking.

The Thinning of the Veil occurs all during the year, but more so during certain times when the Moon is Full or Eclipsing, certain planetary alignments and astronomical/astrological phenomena, solar flaring, big storms also create intense energy and act as an energetic conductor to allow spirit activity to cross over into our physical world.  People can experience increased visual phenomena, sounds, sights, smells and mostly feel the energy.  It is a time to pay attention to your senses.  No you are not going crazy and we all have the ability to pick up and sense spirit, you just have to be open to it, grounded and quiet. When we are rushing around crazy going about our daily life, we are so distracted be external stimuli that we miss most of what is really going on around us.  You may be hypersensitive and emotional when the Veil is Thin and not aware where your feelings are coming from – don’t be surprised if you are picking up energy.  Now is a time where you may experience unbelievable things; you may witness objects moving, alarms clocks going off when they are not supposed to, phones ringing with no one actually on the other end, lights and electronics randomly turning on and off and your pets could be going nuts and barking or chasing invisible playmates.  Also, do not be surprised if items go missing even when you knew exactly where you placed them and then suddenly reappear later in the day or the next day in some bizarre place that you know you did not put them.  Look at this time of the year as a lucky opportunity for signs and messages from your loved ones.  I even go as far as asking for specific signs from specific loved ones so I know they are here with me- I know they are, but my busy life has me not always paying attention.  This is a good time for me to purposely reconnect with them as the Thin Veil makes it easier for them to communicate

READ MORE HERE:  http://www.expressionsoftheuniverse.com/the-veil-is-thinning-are-you-ready/

 

 

This will make you believe in ghosts By Elena Gritzan

One of two cameras set up to run all night. It records both video and audio, which paranormal researchers will review in the days following their investigation. Photo by Elena Gritzan

One of two cameras set up to run all night. It records both video and audio, which paranormal researchers will review in the days following their investigation. Photo by Elena Gritzan

This will make you believe in ghosts

Do the dead remain among us? Paranormal investigators are determined to prove what science rejects, Christianity scorns — and half of Canadians believe.

The first thing they tell me when we meet, just before 2 p.m. on a crisp Saturday in March, is to watch out for the mean man named Henry on the third floor. “Hold on to the railing when you’re on the stairs. We think he might push someone.” As well as being mean, there’s something unusual about Henry: he’s dead.

I’m standing in the gravel parking lot of the Players’ Guild theatre in Hamilton, conferring around parked cars with a trio of paranormal investigators from a team called The Searcher Group. Peter Roe — wearing a fleece sweater from the historic witch-hunting city of Salem, Mass. — James McCulloch and the moustachioed Palmisano brothers, Richard and Paul, are here to collect evidence and learn the histories of the ghosts on the property. They tell me there are at least four, based on their visit the previous autumn.

Staff at the community theatre, North America’s oldest, reached out to Roe last year because they sometimes felt like they weren’t alone — especially on the third floor and in the basement where they often work late at night, finding costumes or organizing props. One member heard a whisper in her ear as she went to lock the front door one night: “Help me! Get me out of here!” She turned around, expecting to see a friend playing a trick on her. There was no one there.

Once strange stories started swirling around the theatre, the haunting became part of the space’s mythology. The front page of its website boasts of “rumours of a ghost in the costume room,” adding it to the list of thousands of houses, churches and other landmarks rumoured to be haunted worldwide. In his 2013 book, Paranormal Nation, Marc E. Fitch argues that the growth of the Internet and the after-effects of 9-11 have pushed people toward the paranormal; extraordinary explanations for unusual experiences can bring order to the chaos of an isolating, uncertain world. The pop culture world has certainly picked up on this yen for the paranormal. Ghost Hunters, a reality TV show where investigators run around haunted houses with expensive recording gear and night-vision goggles, is in its 11th season; single-episode viewership has reached as high as 3.1 million. Innumerable movies with occult and paranormal themes come to the big screen every year, and Stephen King dominates bestseller lists.

For many, ghosts are more than just spooky fiction. A 2007 Ipsos Reid poll found that 48 percent of Canadians believe that ghosts are real; American and British surveys have come up with similar results. Ten percent of Canadians think that they’re living with a spirit

READ MORE HERE: https://broadview.org/this-will-make-you-believe-in-ghosts/

 

13 OUIJA BOARD RULES EVERY BEGINNER SHOULD FOLLOW!

Ouija boards have been around for quite some time now. They might not have always looked the way they do now, but the concept has been the same. Hundreds of years ago, the Chinese would use them to uncover hidden messages. In 1891 the board first began to appear in the United States. They were made popular through funky advertisements and soon flooded most novelty shops. At the time the Ouija board was known as “Ouija, the Wonderful Talking Board” and they were selling at an extremely fast rate. This article will cover essential Ouija board rules.

Ouija board rules

What Are Ouija Boards?

Ouija boards are tools designed to communicate with ghosts. They are also known as Spirit Boards and are commonly used for entertainment. Paranormal experts, as well as those trying to speak with a lost relative, will at some point use an Ouija board to get the answers they seek. A spirit board is usually a flat rectangular panel. It will have the numbers 0-9, letters of the alphabet, “yes”/ “no”, “hello”/ “goodbye”, and other symbols displayed on it. A small heart-shaped piece known as the planchette will be used to spell out the messages. Those participating will lightly place their finger on the planchette, and it will then move around the board to spell out any messages.

what are Ouija boards?

Rules To Using An Ouija Board

Regardless of the specific reason you have decided to use an Ouija board, you must always remember that it is NOT a toy. There is much that can be learned, but if used incorrectly, it can be extremely dangerous.

“The board itself is not dangerous, but the form of communication that you are attempting often is.”

-Dale Kaczmarek of the Ghost Research Society.

If you or anyone you know is considering using an Ouija Board there are a few tips and rules that you should keep in mind:

1.   Always Be Respectful

As mentioned before, an Ouija board is not a game and it should not be treated like one. Even though most spirits are in fact not evil in nature, they should still be treated with respect. Provoking a spirit can have disastrous consequences.

Disrespecting or taunting any entity is always a bad idea. There are those that choose to use an Ouija board and don’t fully believe in its power of communication. A large majority of these people will not take the session serious and end up making the spirit mad. They expect results right away and get easily frustrated when they don’t get what they want.

Remember, things will not always happen at your pace. Even though you are the one initiating the contact, the ghost will ultimately be in charge. Therefore, be patient. The more understanding and polite that you are, the more you will receive in return.

2.   Do Not Believe Everything a Spirit Says

Spirits are known for being mischievous in nature. Keeping in mind that they might not be telling you the truth is very important. Although it is rare, some entities can be malicious. Especially if they have had a tragic passing, don’t wish to speak, or simply do not like the energy in the room.

Just because they have answered a question, does not mean that they have done so truthfully. The same way that you are free to ask them anything that you want, a ghost can also give you an answer that they please. Be honest in your questions and motives to help the spirit trust you. The more that they trust you, the more likely it will be, to be honest.

3.   Never Use an Ouija Board Alone

Ouija boards should always be used with at least two participants. It is not something that you would want to do alone. Finding the right people to join and help you communicate with a spirit might not be such an easy task, but it will sure be worth it.

In order to have a more successful experience, you will want to search for individuals who have some sort of

READ MORE HERE: https://xtremeghosthunting.com/ouija-board-rules/

 

Why We Should Believe In Ghosts By Tok Thompson

Telling tales of ghouls and spectres can have a surprising benefit by encouraging people to change the way they behave.

Halloween is a time when ghosts and spooky decorations are on public display, reminding us of the realm of the dead. But could they also be instructing us in important lessons on how to lead moral lives?

The origins of modern-day Halloween date back to ‘samhain’, a Celtic celebration for the beginning of the dark half of the year when, it was widely believed, the realm between the living and the dead overlapped and ghosts could be commonly encountered.

In 601 AD, to help his drive to convert northern Europe to Christianity, Pope Gregory I directed missionaries not to stop pagan celebrations, but rather to Christianise them.

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Accordingly, over time, the celebrations of samhain became All Souls’ Day and All Saint’s Day, when speaking with the dead was considered religiously appropriate. All Saint’s Day was also known as All Hallows’ Day and the night before became All Hallows’ Evening, or ‘Hallowe’en’.

Not only did the pagan beliefs around spirits of the dead continue, but they also became part of many of early church practices.

Lucrative belief

Pope Gregory I himself suggested that people seeing ghosts should say masses for them. The dead, in this view, might require help from the living to make their journey towards Heaven.

During the Middle Ages, beliefs about souls trapped in purgatory led to the church’s increasing practice of selling indulgences – payments to the church to reduce penalties for

READ MORE:  http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20181030-belief-in-ghosts-may-help-you-lead-a-better-life

 

 

Continue reading “Why We Should Believe In Ghosts By Tok Thompson”

Reasons to Believe in Ghosts in America

About a year ago, I spent some days in Savannah, Georgia, and I bought a ticket for a ghost tour: my first. It was mid-evening, on a Saturday. The plan was to see haunted things around town and then hurry to a dinner reservation. I am not normally a spooky type of person—I avoid horror movies, and I don’t believe in ghosts—but Savannah boasts about being a haunted city, and it sounded nice to spend a twilight hour being told stories in parks. It was a lovely, creeping Southern autumn night: lukewarm, humid, and redolent of turning leaves and moss. At least four people in the group of ticket-holding hauntees were on the upslope of a bachelorette party. The guide was very earnest on the subject of ghosts; he began by playing wind-tunnel-like noises on his phone, and asked us whether we heard screaming voices in them. It would have shocked me if I had, since most phones I’ve encountered have a lot of trouble getting even normal voice reception in the middle of New York. But other people seemed to have better spiritual hearing than I did.

We walked around and saw the façades of gorgeous mansions whose residents had been murdered, or had killed themselves, or else had chanted spells. At one house, our guide said that sometimes, on some nights, the owner shines a blinding light on tours and screams for them to go away. This didn’t really seem so haunted, to me, but it was something to which I could relate.

Then we stopped at Calhoun Square, a small park trimmed in stately homes. A hurricane had come through only days before, and the lawns between the brick paths were still scattered with beaten branches and leaves. The guide said that Calhoun Square was the most haunted square in old Savannah. People walking here, across the centuries, had reported feeling shadows pass through them, a tightness or a great weight on their chests. The other spooky thing that we should know about Calhoun Square, he said, was that it had been a burial ground for slaves—some people estimated that a thousand bodies rested deep beneath the grass, but no one really knew for sure, because the graves were mass and unmarked. The bodies underneath, he said, made it a super-haunted place.

I thought about the Calhoun Square tour the next day, and on the fight home, and on and off through the week after that. The directed blindness of the guide’s account (this place has strange effects on passersby, and it’s unclear why—also, hundreds of uncommemorated slaves were dumped here) got me thinking about America’s fascination with the occult and the particular discomfort that spooky explanations can displace. I’d never considered what people meant when they expressed a fear of ghosts, or what it is to posit haunting in a person or a place. (“Haunted by the past,” we say, usually about people who require therapy.) Those of a rationalist bent assume—at least, I did—that individuals who report feelings of “shadows passing through” are breathing fumes of superstition. But is superstition really the right word for such a thing? It reveals a lot, perhaps, that, when the citizens of a Southern town report feeling strange paroxysms when they walk over the bones of humans raised as chattel, the only options seem to be that there is something ectoplasmic going on or that they’re nuts.

Read more           By:  Nathan Heller          https://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/reasons-to-believe-in-ghosts-in-america  Continue reading “Reasons to Believe in Ghosts in America”