10 Things You Absolutely Must Know Before Getting A Puppy By LARA RUTHERFORD-MORRISON

One of the awesome things about being an adult is that we no longer have to beg our parents to let us get puppies. You’re a grown up—you do what you damn well please! And, of course, what you “damn well please” is to get a puppy—your very own snuggly, furry, happy canine friend—RIGHT NOW. Believe me, I know where you’re coming from. I got my pup last summer, and in the days leading up to finally taking her home, I could barely contain my excitement. (Seriously, I was bouncing off the walls with glee.) And you know what? Having a dog is awesome. Getting to raise a puppy, seeing how she’s grown and learned in the months I’ve had her, has been amazing. It has also been crazy. I thought I was prepared for how much work it was going to be, but I was still completely shocked by how much a three-pound creature was able to turn my life upside down.

As much as we want to take home every puppy we encounter, there are a lot of things you have to think about before taking the plunge into puppy ownership. I may sound like a stick in the mud, but it’s true: Having a dog is a huge responsibility, and one that shouldn’t be taken lightly. When you get a dog, you get her unconditional love and snuggles, but you’re also making a commitment to your pet that she will be well cared for—that she will never end up on the streets, in a shelter, or with people who can’t care for her. If you’re considering getting a dog, ask yourself these ten questions first:

1. Does your lease allow you to have a pet?

First thing’s first: Does your lease allow you to have an animal? If not, talk to your landlord about changing the lease. If he or she won’t budge on the pet issue, then either put off getting a pet or move to a place that will allow you to have one. This is really important. Some people think that they can sneak a pet into their apartments and that their landlords won’t notice, but this is really not OK—because if your landlord does notice and does evict you, it’s not just you who is suddenly homeless—it’s your dog, too.

2. Can you afford to have a dog?

Take some time to consider the financial costs of dog-ownership: vet bills, food, and a pet deposit on your lease, as well as, potentially, professional training and a dog walker. These things add up. Call a local vet and find out the average costs of routine care: vaccines, check ups, heartworm pills, and spaying or neutering. Be sure to think about emergencies, too—do you have a financial cushion that would allow you to pay for unexpected veterinary expenses? Puppies get sick and accidents happen that you can’t predict. You don’t want to end up in a situation in which you have to choose between caring for your dog and paying your rent.

3. Do you really want a puppy?

Puppies are super adorable, but they are also little monsters that require a ton of work and attention. If you don’t have the time or energy to deal with housetraining or the natural hyperness of puppies, consider getting an

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.bustle.com/articles/70287-10-things-you-absolutely-must-know-before-getting-a-puppy

Am I Ready For A Dog? By Dogtime

(Photo by Tim Graham/Getty Images)

If you’ve told yourself, “I need a dog,” or “I want a puppy,” and think you’re ready to adopt, take a moment to fill out this quiz. It will reveal the ideal animal choice for you and your family.

The Quiz

TAKE THE QUIZ & READ MORE HERE: https://dogtime.com/quiz/am-i-ready-for-a-dog#orbZTRsrGLJdKWS4.99

 

 

What Age Should You Spay Your Dog? By Jessica Vogelsang, DVM

New puppy visits have to be one of my favorite appointments in veterinary medicine. Adorable puppies, excited owners, so many opportunities to lay the groundwork for a long and happy life together. We cover lots of topics: vaccinations, deworming schedules, training, nutrition. During the first visit, one of the most common questions I get with puppies is, “When should my pet be spayed or neutered?”

For a very long time, veterinary medicine offered a fairly standard response: Six months. But why is that? Is it truly in every pet’s best interests to be desexed, and if so, why this particular age? Let’s unpack this very important topic so that you understand the factors we consider when we give you our recommendation for spays and neuters.

Understand Exactly What a Spay or Neuter Entails

spay, known in veterinary parlance as ovariohysterectomy, is the surgical removal of both the ovaries and the uterus in female dogs. While ovariectomies (removal of the ovaries, leaving the uterus) are becoming more common in other parts of the world, the complete ovariohysterectomy is still the main procedure taught and performed in the United States. In the dog, the ovaries are up near the kidneys, and the y-shaped uterus extends from both ovaries down to the cervix. An ovariohysterectomy is a major abdominal surgery that carries with it, like all surgeries, risk and benefit.

A neuter procedure, or castration, removes the testicles from a male dog. Unless the dog has a retained testicle (a condition known as cryptorchidism), a neuter procedure does not enter the abdominal cavity. While still a major surgery, it is not as complex as a spay in a healthy, normal male dog.

The Size of the Pet Matters

A main reason veterinarians recommend a spay at six months as opposed to six weeks is concern for anesthesia. Very small pets can be more of a challenge in terms of temperature regulation and anesthetic safety, though with today’s advanced protocols, we can very safely and successfully anesthetize even tiny pediatric patients. In a shelter environment, where highly trained and experienced staff perform thousands of pediatric spays and neuters a year, it is not uncommon to perform these procedures in pets closer to

READ MORE:  https://www.petmd.com/dog/general-health/what-age-should-you-spay-your-dog

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