10 Ways to Use the Waning Moon in Witchcraft by Moody Moons

As the receding light of the waning moon retreats into oblivion like a great ocean tide, we turn out energy inward to eliminate or re-work repetitive patterns that no longer serve us.  Harness the cleansing power of this lunar phase to clear obstacles and release negative influences.

10 ways to use the waning moon

Try a weight loss spell.

If you’re trying to get in the right frame of mind for weight loss or fasting, ride the “drawing away” or receding energy of waning moon to gain some momentum.

Let go of a toxic friendship.  

Use the waning moon to finally release that cyclic, dead-end relationship.   You know the one.   Take any items that remind you of the person and get rid of them.  Write down any residual feelings, then burn the paper in a cauldron with some dried rosemary.  Be free.

Reduce debt. 

Instead of using your spell work to increase wealth under the waxing moon, think of reducing debt under the waning moon.  It’s a totally different mindset that moves you towards less consumption, more mindful spending and greater personal freedom.

Make an offering or donation. 

I think of the waning moon as a retreating tide coming to collect on the gifts brought to shore by the last wave.  Send blessings out to sea so that the next full moon tide brings them back to you.  Say “yes” when the cashier asks you if you’d like to donate a dollar to a children’s charity, drop a few quarters in the “Give a Penny, Take a Penny” or drop off a load at the Salvation Army.

Using a healing spell to ease grief.

Whether you recently lost a loved one, or you still grieve for one who passed long ago, if you feel ready to begin the healing process, try a spell to let go of a deceased loved one.

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Leave your job to start something new.  

If you’ve been thinking of transitioning to another position and you have some control over the timing, consider scheduling your last day during the waning moon.  The retreating energy of the waning moon aids in letting go of the past to ready for the future.

Exorcise your home.  

If you feel your house bogged down with negative energy (frequent family fighting, excessive clutter or unmanageable chaos), clean your house top to bottom.  Then bring a pot of water to boil on the stove with rosemary, cinnamon sticks and lavender petals to dispel darkness and restore harmony.

Take a waning moon bath.  

Fill a muslin bag or tea strainer with star anise, orange peel and bay leaf.   Let it steep in your bathwater and relax in candle light.  Meditate, focusing on any unwanted or residual energy from the previous moon cycle.  Imagine it seeping into the water.  Then, pull the bath stopper and watch your discomfort drain away.

Get a massage. 

Nothing beats negative stress stored in the body like a massage.  Most massage therapists are quite happy to let you bring your own oil.  Blend a (skin safe!) mixture of oils for releasing negativity, bring it to your massage therapist and imagine she is massaging away your stored anxieties, fears and tensions.

Reverse 

READ MORE HERE: https://moodymoons.com/2017/11/06/10-ways-to-use-the-waning-moon-in-witchcraft/

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History of Friday the 13th

Long considered a harbinger of bad luck, Friday the 13th has inspired a late 19th-century secret society, an early 20th-century novel, a horror film franchise and not one but two unwieldy terms—paraskavedekatriaphobia and friggatriskaidekaphobia—that describe fear of this supposedly unlucky day.

The Fear of 13

Just like walking under a ladder, crossing paths with a black cat or breaking a mirror, many people hold fast to the belief that Friday the 13th brings bad luck. Though it’s uncertain exactly when this particular tradition began, negative superstitions have swirled around the number 13 for centuries.

While Western cultures have historically associated the number 12 with completeness (there are 12 days of Christmas, 12 months and zodiac signs, 12 labors of Hercules, 12 gods of Olympus and 12 tribes of Israel, just to name a few examples), its successor 13 has a long history as a sign of bad luck.

The ancient Code of Hammurabi, for example, reportedly omitted a 13th law from its list of legal rules. Though this was probably a clerical error, superstitious people sometimes point to this as proof of 13’s longstanding negative associations.

Fear of the number 13 has even earned a psychological term: triskaidekaphobia.

Why is Friday the 13th Unlucky?

According to biblical tradition, 13 guests attended the Last Supper, held on Maundy Thursday, including Jesus and his 12 apostles (one of whom, Judas, betrayed him). The next day, of course, was Good Friday, the day of Jesus’ crucifixion.

The seating arrangement at the Last Supper is believed to have given rise to a longstanding Christian superstition that having 13 guests at a table was a bad omen—specifically, that it was courting death.

Though Friday’s negative associations are weaker, some have suggested they also have roots in Christian tradition: Just as Jesus was crucified on a Friday, Friday was also said to be the day Eve gave Adam the fateful apple from the Tree of Knowledge, as well as the day Cain killed his brother, Abel.

The Thirteen Club

In the late-19th century, a New Yorker named Captain William Fowler (1827-1897) sought to remove the enduring stigma surrounding the number 13—and particularly the unwritten rule about not having 13 guests at a dinner table—by founding an exclusive society called the Thirteen Club.

The group dined regularly on the 13th day of the month in room 13 of the Knickerbocker Cottage, a popular watering hole Fowler owned from 1863 to 1883. Before sitting down for a 13-course dinner, members would pass beneath a ladder and a banner reading “Morituri te Salutamus,” Latin for “Those of us who are about to die salute you.”

Four former U.S. presidents (Chester A. ArthurGrover ClevelandBenjamin Harrison and Theodore Roosevelt) would join the Thirteen Club’s ranks at one time or another.

Friday the 13th in Pop Culture

An important milestone in the history of the Friday the 13th legend in particular (not just the number 13) occurred in 1907, with the publication of the novel Friday, the Thirteenth written by Thomas William Lawson.

The book told the story of a New York City stockbroker who plays on superstitions about the date to create chaos on Wall Street, and make a killing on the market.

The horror movie Friday the 13th, released in 1980, introduced the world to a hockey mask-wearing killer named Jason, and is perhaps the best-known example of the famous superstition in pop culture history. The movie spawned multiple sequels, as well as comic books, novellas, video games, related merchandise and countless terrifying Halloween costumes.

What bad things happened on Friday 13th?

On Friday, October 13, 1307, officers of King Philip IV of France arrested hundreds of the Knights Templar, a powerful religious and military order formed in the 12th century for the defense of the Holy Land.

Imprisoned on charges of various illegal behaviors (but really because the king wanted access to their financial resources), many Templars were later executed. Some cite the link with the Templars as the origin of the Friday the 13th superstition, but like many legends involving the Templars and their history, the truth remains murky.

In more recent times, a number of traumatic events have occurred on Friday the 13th, including the German bombing of Buckingham Palace(September 1940); the murder of Kitty Genovese in Queens, New York (March 1964); a cyclone that killed more than 300,000 people in Bangladesh (November 1970); the disappearance of a Chilean Air Force plane in the Andes (October 1972); the death of rapper Tupac Shakur (September 1996) and the crash of the Costa Concordia cruise ship off the coast of Italy, which killed 30 people (January 2012).

Sources

“The Origins of Unlucky Friday the 13th,” Live Science.
“Friday the 13th: why is it unlucky and other facts about the worst day in the calendar,” The Telegraph.
“13 Freaky Things That Happened on Friday the 13th,” Live Science.
“Here’s Why Friday the 13th is Considered Unlucky,” Time.
“Friggatriskaidekaphobes Need Not Apply,” New-York Historical Society.

There’s a Full Moon Due on Friday the 13th for Most of the U.S. The Next One Isn’t for Another 30 Years

Time Magazine September 12, 2019

BY GINA MARTINEZ

The next full moon is set to make an appearance on the most ominous date on the calendar this month.

A September full moon, also known as a “Harvest Moon,” will be visible to many Americans this Friday the 13th.

According to NASA, the moon will be full early Saturday morning, Sept. 14, at 12:33 a.m. EST, but for those who live in the Central, Mountain and Pacific time zones, the full moon will be visible shortly before midnight on Friday the 13th.

NASA says that the moon will appear full for about three days centered around this time — from Thursday night through Sunday morning.

To read the rest Friday 13, 2019

Greetings!

Greetings from the Silver Sage Witch.

Are you superstitious?

Do you become afraid at the mere mention of Friday the 13th?

Well, be sure to watch my new video called, “SUPERSTITION,” tomorrow and tell me some of your superstitions.

Stay safe, lovely peeps!

Muwaaaahhh! 😁🧙🏾‍♀️👻🔮

Bright Magickal Blessings 💜

Full Moon Magic: Harness Lunar Energy for Healing

You don’t have to be a NASA scientist, astronomer, or astrology-aficionado to appreciate the sheer awe-inspiring magic of a full moon.

It’s an experience we’ve all encountered: after a long day, you’re heading home at twilight and suddenly you notice a stunning full moon rising on the horizon. Whatever thoughts were on your mind disappear and you feel an amazing surge of energy and awe. Your connection to the natural world wakes up and you, too, begin to shine!

Full moon energy

Full moons stir up our emotions and amplify mystical powers connected to the human spirit. You take joy in watching what was once dark come into the light, your mind plays out scenes of potential chaos in a wild and untamed world while also basking in deep and uninhibited feeling that is impossible to define.

The time of the full moon is a powerful energy healing opportunity, an optimum time for meditating, recharging your energy field, and clearing your chakras. That is why so many cultures have full moon rituals and ceremonies—there’s so much pure energy in the moonlight that anything it touches can’t help but respond to its radiance and love.

Using the lunar energy of a full moon can yield incredible healing results, both physically and mentally. Full moons bathe your skin in a soft light, while also illuminating the often overlooked crevices of your subconscious—giving you insights into your spirit and soul.

Five full moon rituals that use the healing power of lunar energy:

FULL MOON RITUAL #1
Shine a light on your emotions

During the full moon, emotions are magnified. You have probably heard people blame the full moon when human behavior gets a bit wacky.

Because emotions are more easily accessible during a full moon, it’s a perfect opportunity to acknowledge and release them. By releasing strong emotions that come to light during a full moon, you’ll clear your chakras; this full moon cleansing ritual ensures that you are able to capture the full spectrum of healing energy from the full moon.

If you actively journal, you’ll see big benefits during a full moon.  In addition to expressing your inner truths and feelings, it’s a good time to write out your intentions, make decisions about what you really want, and fully embrace your truest self.

Below are a few journal prompts to help you get started:

  • What does my physical body most need right now?
  • What environments make me feel good?
  • What self-care routines most nourish and heal me?
  • What am I stopping myself from doing?

FULL MOON RITUAL #2
Take a moon bath

Moonlight has holistic healing properties and is able to cleanse your mind, body, and spirit. Spending time under a full moon’s vibrant white glow is like stepping into a warm soothing bath (without the water).

Take a walk under the full moon, preferably with some of your skin exposed to its healing light. As you begin to relax, gaze up at the brilliance of the full moon and bask in its energy and love. Pay special attention to the feelings and emotions coursing through your body and in your chakras. Listen closely to your subconscious: perhaps there is a message that the moon is lighting up inside of you.

A moon bath steeps your body and spirit in purifying light, washing away negativity and leaving you fresh and renewed.

FULL MOON RITUAL #3
Tack up some dreams

Harness the positive energy of the moon by envisioning your goals and dreams. Picture your life as you wish it to be and tack up some actual pictures of your dreams and desires on your vision board. As you dream, so shall you become!

What are your intentions? Your goals? Bucket list experiences?

The full moon will magnify any energy you send out, and help guide it into the welcoming embrace of the universe. Be clear and specific about what you wish to manifest and don’t be surprised when your intentions come true.

Read more      By Deborah King      https://deborahking.com/full-moon-magic-harness-healing/

Continue reading “Full Moon Magic: Harness Lunar Energy for Healing”

What Does a Full Moon Mean? The Role of the Full Moon in Astrology

The full moon is a peak, and many feel the buzz. It’s a crescendo and sometimes brings on a reckoning, or a moment of truth. It’s associated with illumination since it lights up the dream time landscape.

At the full moon, the luminaries, the sun and moon, are always in opposite Zodiac signs.  The polarity brings heightened tension, as balance is sought between the two extremes.

Waxing and Waning Moon

When the moon has been waxing (increasing), set new moon intentions, and be ready to act. In the hum of the jolty energies, there can be epiphanies about things that were vague desires at the new moon.

Make it real, with tangible actions, perhaps a ritual that signifies you’re ready to integrate your intent. Stay open to surprise, too, and divine inspiration.

Every month, you have a chance to experience a fresh start. The moon’s waxing and waning are like the shortest hand on the cosmic clock. The intentions we set with the moon can get specific, and match the traits of the sign that month.

This is a way to stay attuned to cosmic currents and go with the flow. It’s a constant in a chaotic time, that the moon waxes and wanes. Each lunation is a chance to set new goals, and feel closer to a bigger mystery.

Full Moon Intentions

This word is used a lot and is interchangeable with the word goals. Perhaps, though, it suggests an active engagement in what you’re co-creating with the universe.

Your intent is what you intend to create in your life. Some like to create Vision Boards at the New Moon. But the amped-up energies and clear sight make the full moon ideal for dreaming-while-awake.

Preparing for the Full Moon

Each full Moon has a different intuitive feel, and any ritual you do could draw on the essence of the sign. As it approaches, you might gather photos, found objects, meaningful totems, and place them with your intentions in a prominent place. You might light a candle in a simple full moon ritual.

Time to Celebrate

The full moon often casts an exuberant vibe, making it a great time to have a party. This also opens the door for meaningful people to step into your life. But keep in mind that it can be intense, too. There’s a reason why more patrolmen are sent out on full moons. Take time to honor yourself in some way for any steps you took since the new moon.

The Climax and the Big Reveal

Sometimes full moons feel like the end of an act in your ongoing life story. It’s like in a movie where all the plot points are pulled together, and for a brief moment, you can see the interwoven whole. If you set intentions, the full Moon is a time when you begin to make out the path and can take an exciting step forward. It is both a culmination and a time to act on something you’ve imagined. In the act of doing, you have brought an idea into reality and made magic.

 

by Molly Hall