6 reasons you must massage your breasts! Yes, you can do it on your own TNN

01/8Why you should be massaging your breasts

Breast massaging is a known but neglected practice. The benefits of this are not only limited to sexual stimulation but one’s overall well-being. There are various ways to go about breast massaging, the most common and effective one being Taoist Breast Massage, a technique which is easy and can be done on your own if you are not comfortable with a stranger touching your lady part. This massage practice requires warm-hand-circulation on your breasts. Read the technique and the after effects of a regular massage routine below.

02/8​The technique

THE TECHNIQUE: Warm your hands by rubbing them with or without oil. Now, gradually rub them in circles around your breast. This should be done in an upward and outward movement. The circuit of this massage should be breasts going towards your face and then towards the outline of your breasts. Maintain light pressure otherwise it can lead to pain. Do this for 36 repititions in both directions, upward and downward.

03/8​Can enlarge them

CAN ENLARGE THEM: Breast massage can help increase blood circulation in this fat-storing tissue. Due to massage, a breast enlarging hormone

 

READ MORE:  https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/health-fitness/photo-stories/6-reasons-you-must-massage-your-breasts-yes-you-can-do-it-on-your-own/photostory/63938328.cms?picid=63938339

 

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The Super Superfood You’re Probably Not Eating Five good reasons to add sauerkraut to your diet by Shelley Emling

The Super Superfood You’re Probably Not Eating

Researchers also found that sauerkraut can reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

Is there anything better at a summer barbecue than a hot dog with sauerkraut tucked inside the bun? Not much. And beyond the taste, there also are plenty of healthy reasons to add this fermented cabbage to your diet — not only during the summer, but all year long. Here are just five of them.


 


1. Sauerkraut packs a punch when it comes to vitamins.

Popular throughout Central Europe for centuries, sauerkraut is a great source of vitamin C. And vitamin C — a superstar antioxidant — helps protect the body from stress and free radical damage. Other healthy nutrients in sauerkraut include vitamin K, known for its role in blood clotting, as well as calcium, potassium and phosphorus. An added bonus is that fermentation makes these nutrients easier for your body to absorb.

2. Sauerkraut boosts your digestive system.

Sauerkraut is ripe with probiotic power, or beneficial bacteria that wards off toxins and not-so-beneficial bacteria. In short, probiotics actually feed the good bacteria in your gut, which leads to better digestive health. Probiotics also have been shown to lessen gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation and symptoms associated with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

3. Sauerkraut could help you lose weight.

Like most vegetables, sauerkraut is a low-calorie food with a lot of fiber. As such, it can make you feel fuller for longer, which could help with weight loss. With only 15 calories in two-thirds of a cup, sauerkraut is the perfect snack when you get hungry between meals.

4. Sauerkraut may reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s.

Study after study shows a connection between the health of the gut and the health of the brain. Indeed, recent research out of Lund University in Sweden found that unhealthy intestinal flora could speed up the development of

 

READ MORE:  https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2017/superfood-sauerkraut-health-benefits-fd.html

 

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Is Salt As Bad As Once Thought?

Woman adding too much salt to pizza, is salt as bad as once thought?

Should you avoid salt? Some sources claim it isn’t as bad for your health as once thought. David Trachtenbarg, MD, UnityPoint Health, says having too much salt in your diet is entirely possible, and while you do need some salt in your body, he explains the reasons why watching your salt intake still matters.

What’s Too Much Salt?

On average, Dr. Trachtenbarg says most people consume between 9,000-12,000 milligrams of sodium a day, roughly over three times the recommended amount. He suggests keeping daily sodium levels at 2,300 milligrams maximum, with less than 1,500 milligrams being preferred, especially for adults with high blood pressure.

“For most people, there are no side effects of having too much sodium,” Dr. Trachtenbarg says. “But, that doesn’t mean salt can’t have a negative effect on the body.”

He lists the health impacts of consuming excess sodium:

  • Blood pressure. Eating too much salt is linked to hypertension, or high blood pressure. Reducing salt intake to 5,000-6,000 milligrams per day has shown to lower blood pressure.
  • Heart health. If you have heart disease or congestive heart failure, extra salt can cause fluid retention, which can lead to shortness of breath and hospitalization.
  • Kidney function. If you have kidney disease, too much salt in your diet may cause you to retain fluid, leading to weight gain and bloating.
  • Diabetes. While not directly connected to blood sugar, eating too much salt increases the risk of complications from diabetes.

“Nearly every processed food has added salt,” Dr. Trachtenbarg says. “When eating processed foods, it’s important to look at the amount of sodium listed on the nutrition label.”

How to Reduce Sodium Intake

The simplest way to reduce the amount of salt in your diet is avoiding processed foods and not adding salt to your meal. Dr. Trachtenbarg encourages you to look closely at nutritional labels, staying away from foods with high salt content, like bacon and large pickles.

“Reduced sodium or low-sodium foods can help reduce blood pressure, but foods with close to zero salt are often tasteless. The good news is if you limit salt intake, your body becomes more sensitive to the salt in food. This means many processed foods may become too salty for your taste, and you can enjoy lower sodium foods without missing the flavor,” Dr. Trachtenbarg says.

Other common beliefs about reducing sodium don’t hold as much promise. Dr. Trachtenbarg lists why the following steps don’t balance out salt consumption.

  • Drinking more water. Extra water doesn’t “wash out” the salt. High salt intake can lead to bloating and fluid retention.
  • Sweating it out. There’s about 500 milligrams of salt in a pound of sweat. Normally, only a very few athletic people will sweat a significant amount of salt. Even though exercising in high temperatures produces more sweat and salt, it can also lead to heat stroke, which can be fatal.
  • Using “healthy” salt options. Sea salt is often talked about as being a better sodium option. And, while sea salt does have a different element make-up than salt (sodium chloride), there’s no clear benefit of choosing sea salt over regular table salt.

As for those who say at least salt is better than sugar, Dr. Trachtenbarg says that isn’t

READ MORE: https://www.unitypoint.org/livewell/article.aspx?id=ad2fb339-a297-4b0b-959c-5033c35cc8bb

Hair Dye: How Badly Does It Damage Your Hair? By: Jess Bolluyt

woman gets new hair colour

If there’s a particular way you like to wear your hair, chances are good that you’re doing some damage to it in the process. Heat-styling tools can easily hurt your hair. Similarly, chemically straightening or curling your hair can leave it dried out. And using hair products that are bad for your health can damage your hair and exacerbate other health issues.

The problem is that it’s pretty easy to avoid thinking about how badly hair dye can damage your hair. That’s because we all have our routines. Whether you have a running appointment with your stylist or a long-standing love affair with your favorite drugstore hair dye, you know the drill. You’re used to the routine and probably don’t think too much about it, even if it involves damaging bleach or colors that simply won’t fade.

So if you routinely dye your hair, or are thinking about starting, now might be a good time to learn a little bit about exactly what hair dye does to your locks. Here’s what you must know.

Ammonia lifts the hair cuticle, and peroxide destroys the color

A Hari's salon employee has her hair rinsed

Here’s how hair dye stays in your hair. | Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

Cosmetic chemist Ni’Kita Wilson explains to The Huffington Post that in order to deposit color onto your hair, the dye has to be able to get into the hair shaft. To do that, it has to move beyond the cuticle, which acts a little bit like tree bark and protects your hair from damage. To penetrate beyond the cuticle, hair dye uses ammonia to elevate the pH of the hair and to relax and lift the cuticle. Immediately, you’ve damaged your hair, since the cuticle isn’t meant to be lifted up.

Once the cuticle is lifted, the next step is to dye the hair your intended color. So, hair dye uses peroxide to break down your natural hair pigment. Peroxide is extremely drying to hair and is the reason why colored hair can take on a straw-like texture. As the peroxide developer sits, the cuticle remains lifted for the dye to penetrate into the open cuticle and hair shaft. The longer the cuticle is lifted, the more it weakens. Once you rinse your hair, the cuticle comes back down. But damage has already been done.

If you’re interested in the specifics of how the process works, chemistry teacher Andy Brunning reports on his blog Compound Interest that hydrogen peroxide is a strong oxidizing agent. It oxidizes the natural melanin pigments in hair, removing some of the conjugated double bonds that lead to their color, making them colorless. Actually dyeing the hair requires an alkaline pH, provided by the ammonia, which causes the cuticle to swell and can ultimately damage the hair.

Less-damaging alternatives don’t last as long

A hairdresser washing the hair of a client at a salon in Taipei.

You can try less-damaging hair dyeing methods, but they might not be as effective. | Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images