The types of clouds: everything you need to know by Tibi Puiu

Clouds come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. Some look cute and fluffy, others appear menacing and apocalyptic.

Not all clouds are created equal. Some are puffy and sweet, others are gray and uniform while others still are so erratic and capricious that the human mind starts to see things; bunnies, cows or a nation’s borders.

The different types of clouds are named based on their shape and how high up they hover in the troposphere. For instance, the diagram below provides a quick overview of the most common types of clouds based on altitude.

Credit: Center for Science Education

The three main types of clouds

A cloud is a visible accumulation of minute droplets of wate, ice crystals, or both, suspended in the air. Though they vary in shape and size, all clouds are basically formed in the same way through the vertical of air above the condensation level. Clouds may also form in contact with the ground surface, too. Such a cloud would be known as fog

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https://www.zmescience.com/science/types-of-clouds/

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Understanding the Symbolism of the Acorn By: Nora Mueller

For many, the unassuming acorns that fall from an oak tree are the bane of those with driveways and front lawns that they’d like to keep clean underfoot. But in recent years, there has been a growing trend towards finding an alternative use for acorns, rather than just raking them together in a seemingly endless heap.

In many ways, acorns are the crystallization of the recent wild, foraged food trend; they are frequently considered an annoyance (like nettles) but are secretly a superfood– a gluten-free nut and grain alternative that’s high in amino acids.

Acorns can also be stored in their shells for years, and– when properly treated– can be used in a multitude of recipes, infusing nutrients and essential vitamins wherever they are added.

Eating acorns is, of course, not a recent trend; along with their progenitor, the oak tree, they have long been revered as a resource, with a rich history in mythologies around the world. In Sanskrit, the word for oak evokes the concept of thunder, life, soul, and spirit; for the Druids, the oak tree was the most sacred tree– so much so that historians believe the word “Druid” itself is from the Celtic word for “acorn”. Abundant as they are, it’s little surprise that acorns have long been consumed both as a delicacy and as an everyday meal.

Acorns are a token of nature’s alchemical magic: a tiny, hardened nut transforms into a tall, wizened tree.

In America, most people know that Native American tribes– particularly those in California– make use of acorns, cooking them into porridge, pancakes, cakes, breads, soups, and patties.

But internationally, different cultures across the world have found their own ways of adopting the nut and incorporating it into their cuisine: in Korea, acorns are transformed into a jelly known as dotorimuk while in Turkey acorns are buried in the dirt to remove tannins (which is the compound that gives acorns their bitter taste) before being washed, dried, and ground with spices into a drink known as raccahout.

Outside of direct human consumption, acorns also have had an important culinary role: jamon iberico, derived from pigs raised on acorns, is considered a Spanish specialty, and oak trees are being planted to help support truffle production. Historically, acorns have also enjoyed uses outside of the gustatory world, used as dye and prepared into a medicine taken by Native American elders to promote longevity.

Today, acorns are becoming more of a mainstream commodity as foraging increasingly becomes a popular activity, one that has spread beyond the realm of picking berries and gathering mushrooms.

Acorns are cropping up in classic recipes (acorn mousse anyone?), especially as acorn flour becomes more readily available and mechanization has cut out the long and arduous process of leaching tannins by oneself (which in days of yore could sometimes take months).

If you do want to

READ MORE HERE:  https://gardencollage.com/nourish/farm-to-table/acorns-ultimate-forgeable-fall-food/

 

 

 

THE BUCKET LIST: 37 DIFFERENT TYPES OF COFFEE TO TRY by Asser Christensen

different kinds of coffee (1)

I get it; coffee can be confusing. Back in the days, you only really had to think about whether you wanted it with sugar or milk, or just black, but recently more and more crazy concoctions have sprung up.

This is my attempt at making a list that covers all different types of coffee and whether you should try them or not.

COMMON TYPES OF BLACK COFFEES

  1. Drip Coffee: This is the classic coffee from your childhood. It’s brewed with a drip coffee machine and a paper filter. You already know whether or not you like this coffee, so I’m not going to give you any advice here.
  2. Batch Brew: This kind of coffee is similar to drip coffee, but usually it’s made with a larger brewing device. Many specialty coffee shops have started offering this type of coffee, which means that it’s often an excellent option if you want a delicious cup of coffee with no additions.
  3. Espresso: A tiny cup of coffee, usually around 1 oz, originating in Italy. Brewed on an espresso machine that can force hot water through a puck of finely ground coffee with at least 9 bars of pressure. Espresso has a layer of golden-brownish crema on top. This type of coffee is the foundation of many other coffee drinks.
  4. Americano: This type of coffee is an espresso diluted with hot water. Strength-wise it’s usually slightly stronger than drip coffee, and the flavor is often a bit more ‘roasty’ and intense.
  5. Pour Over: Similar to drip coffee, except it has been brewed manually by the barista. Often he or she will use a small pour overcone from a company such as Hario and slowly add water with a gooseneck kettle. One of my favorite brew methods.
  6. Instant coffee: Pour hot water on freeze-dried coffee. Stir. Easy to make but usually not very tasty as a cheap type of coffee called ‘Robusta’ is mostly used.

LESSER KNOWN BLACK COFFEES

  1. Ristretto: An espresso with only half as much water and an even finer grind size resulting in a super intense flavor.
  2. Doppio: Italian word for ‘double espresso.’
  3. Long Black: Australian expression for ‘Americano.’
  4. Siphon Coffee: Brewed using a glass device called a Siphon or vacuum brewing pot. It relies on vacuum to pull water through ground coffee. Mostly seen in specialty coffee shops like Blue Bottle. A nuanced, yet bold coffee brewing method.
  5. Aeropress: This kind of coffee is made by using something that looks like an oversized syringe. The brew method combines both immersion and infusion. By using air pressure, it forces the brewed coffee through a paper filter. Cup quality can be excellent; a cheap and easy way to make good coffee at home.
  6. Turkish Coffee: Finely ground coffee is boiled in a unique kettle with sugar and served unfiltered. Not only served in Turkey, but also in parts of Eastern Europe and the Middle East.

MILK-BASED COFFEES

  1. Cappuccino: One of the most common types of coffee. Consists of a double shot of espresso and equal parts of steamed milk and milk foam on top.
  2. Latte: A caffe latte (or just latte, as it’s usually called) is a

READ MORE HERE:  https://coffeechronicler.com/different-types-of-coffee/

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Glass straws? Straw straws? Here are some eco-friendly alternatives to plastic BY:David Carrig

The war on plastic straws is growing as more companies such as McDonald’s and cites such as New York are facing pressure to find sustainable and eco-friendly alternatives that won’t pollute our oceans, litter our beaches or wind up harming animals.

McDonald’s shareholders on Thursday rejected a proposal that asked the fast-food giant to report on the business risks of using plastic straws and look for alternatives.

Despite the rejection, the fast-food giant  has begun experimenting with using paper straws in its U.K. restaurants and making plastic straws available only on request.

It is estimated that more than 500 million single-use plastic straws are used and thrown away every day in the U.S. alone as Americans use them at an average rate of 1.6 straws per person per day, according to the National Park Service. That translates into 175 billion straws a year.

It’s no wonder sea turtles are being found with plastic straws stuck up their noses.

Only 14% of plastic packaging is collected for recycling, and “a staggering 32% of plastic packaging escapes collection systems,” according to a 2016 study by the World Economic Forum.

A study by the University of California Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) found that 8 million metric tons of plastic trash end up in our oceans every year. That’s equivalent to five grocery bags filled with plastic for every foot of coastline in the world.

Plastic straws are one of the top 10 plastic items found in beach cleanups every year.
Getty Images/iStockphoto

And while plastic straws represent only a fraction of the overall tonnage of ocean plastic, they are less likely to make it into recycling bins, and their small size make them dangerous for marine animals and are consumed by fish.

More: Our trash is harming the deepest fish in the ocean

More: McDonald’s shareholders vote against plastic straw study

This has led environmentalists and conservation groups to add

 

READ MORE:  https://eu.usatoday.com/story/money/nation-now/2018/05/23/sustainable-alternatives-plastic-straws-recyling/632993002/

 

 

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The 10 Best Electric Cars Coming Out in 2019 Benjamin Smith

Automakers have made significant progress with their development of electric powered cars. Improvements in performance along with their range and available features that make them desirable choices is getting better with each new year. There are some exciting new electric cars that are going to be released into the market for the upcoming year. If you’re not yet a fan of these eco-friendly vehicles, there might be something on the horizon that changes your mind. This mode of power is a burgeoning wave of the future in automoive technology and we expect what is now a small ripple to become a tsunami in its magnitude in the decade to come. We bring the 10 best electric cars for 2019 list to the fore for your consideration.

1. Audi E-tron Sportback (2019)

The Audi E tron Sportback made an initial appearance at the Shanghai motor show in 2017. The concept car was a sneak peak at what would be coming down the road in 2019. It’s about the same size as the brand’s Audi A7, along with the coupe styling feature, but there will be a few notable changes. The driving position will be raised and it will assume a more aggressive stance and detailing as seen in SUV styling. If you’re concerned about the power, it comes with three electric motors that will boost the hp to 486 and when you accelerate, you’ll move from 0 to 62 in about four and a half seconds.

2. Jaguar XJ (2019)

Jaguar is getting ready for the reveal of the new XJ for 2019, which will replace its XJ luxury car with an all electric platform and no offerings for diesel or petrol alternatives. It’s the car that kicks off a new chapter in the story of the automaker. Jag will offer a five door hatch model which is a departure from the four door saloon.

3. Mini E (2019)

This will be the new revelation for the Mini experimental car that was produced in 2009 and 2010. Early models were only let out in a limited number for the purpose of testing trials. With the perfected version that is coming some ten years later, the fully electric new 2019 Mini E is

READ MORE:  https://moneyinc.com/best-electric-cars-coming-out-2019/

 

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10 All-Natural DIY Fertilizers for Your Garden and Yard By Bruce and Jeanne Lubin

You’ve probably heard that you can use a banana peel and other compost to fertilize your garden, but did you know some items—like gelatin, coffee grounds, and even a matchbook—can have specific benefits for your plants?

gardening

Hydrogen Peroxide for Plant Roots

Help strengthen your plant’s root system with hydrogen peroxide—the extra pump of oxygen from the peroxide prevents root rot and over-watering. Just mix a tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide with 2 cups water, and water your plant with the solution. Its disinfectant properties will fend off bacteria, mold, fungus, and other nasty soil-borne diseases.

Cereal Crumb Fertilizer

Did you know that cereal crumbs are great for plants? They supply much-needed nutrients to the soil, which makes sense given that they’re grains that came from the soil in the first place! Instead of shaking the box over the trash before ripping it up for recycling, dump the remains of the flakes into your houseplants or garden for a treat they’ll love.

Make Your Own Bonemeal

As you may know, bonemeal is an excellent source of nutrients for your plants. But instead of spending $8–$10 on a bag at your local gardening store, make your own! Bonemeal is just bones, after all. Save bones from chicken, turkey, steaks, and stews, then dry them out by roasting them in a 425ºF oven for a half an hour or microwaving them on high for 1–6 minutes (depending on how many bones you have). Then place them in a plastic or paper bag and grind them up by hitting them with a hammer, then rolling them with a rolling pin. Mix the resulting powder into your soil for a life-producing treat for your plants. And you didn’t spend a cent!

A Must-Have for Growing Carrots and Tomatoes

The best thing you can give your carrot and tomato plant seeds is also what keeps you going during the day—coffee! Carrots and tomatoes both need extra nitrogen, which coffee has in spades. Mix the seeds with coffee grounds (used is fine) before you plant them. The coffee will provide your growing plants with the nitrogen they need, while having some extra bulk to plant will ensure they don’t end up all lumped together.

Slow-Release Nitrogen

For plants other than carrots and tomatoes, extra nitrogen can give them a boost, but too much can harm them. So use this nitrogen-rich DIY fertilizer that releases the nitrogen slowly into the ground. Dissolve a packet of unflavored gelatin in 3 cups warm water. Then use it to water plants in need of a little TLC. You’ll get all the benefits of an expensive fertilizer without the price tag!

Epsom Salt Lawn Fertilizer

Did you know Epsom salts are one of the best natural lawn fertilizers around? They’re composed of magnesium and sulfur, both of which are highly beneficial to grass. Magnesium kick-starts seed germination and is also a player in manufacturing chlorophyll, the substance that plants create from sunlight in order to feed themselves. Sulfur, meanwhile, also helps with

READ MORE:  https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/house-home/housekeeping/gardening/10-all-natural-diy-fertilizers-for-your-garden-and-yard

 

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Fluoride As a Neurotoxin: 9 Ways It Harms Your Brain Created by Deane Alban

woman looks surprised at a glass of water

Fluoride is a trace mineral that, in sufficient quantity, is harmful to mental health. Consider these reasons to avoid fluoridated water and toothpaste.

1. Fluoride Is a Developmental Neurotoxin

A neurotoxin is a substance that’s poisonous or destructive to the tissues in the brain, spinal cord, and nervous system.

A developmental neurotoxin is one that affects the brain during the most susceptible stages of life — before birth and during early childhood.

A recent study in The Lancet, one of the most prestigious and highly regarded medical journals, recommended that fluoride be classified as a developmental neurotoxin along with lead, mercury, arsenic, PCBs, and toluene. (4)

Study authors believe that there is a “pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity” and fluoride is a contributor.

Developmental neurotoxins are linked to increases in autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyslexia, loss of IQ points, disruptive behavior, and other cognitive impairments.

2. The Ingestion of Fluoride Lowers IQ in Children

Harvard School of Public Health and China Medical University did a joint analysis of 27 studies on the effects of fluoride and found a strong correlation between fluoride and adverse effects on brain development. (5)

Children in high-fluoride areas had significantly lower IQ scores than those living in low-fluoride areas.

This is not the only study that supports these findings.

To date, more than 50 human studies have linked fluoride to reduced IQ in both children and adults. (6)

3. Fluoride Facilitates the Entry of Aluminum Into the Brain

In the 1970s, autopsies revealed that Alzheimer’s patients had higher than normal concentrations of neurotoxic aluminum in their brains.

It’s now understood that fluoride may play a role in the aluminum-Alzheimer’s connection.

The blood-brain barrier is a semipermeable membrane designed to keep foreign substances — like fluoride and aluminum — out of the brain.

When aluminum comes into contact with fluoride, it hitches a ride into the brain as aluminum fluoride, bypassing the blood-brain barrier.

The presence of aluminum fluoride in the brain has been linked to Alzheimer’s. (7)

4. Fluoridated Drinking Water Doubles the Risk of Hypothyroidism

Fluoride, especially when added to drinking water,

READ MORE:  https://bebrainfit.com/fluoride-neurotoxin/

 

 

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