Glass straws? Straw straws? Here are some eco-friendly alternatives to plastic BY:David Carrig

The war on plastic straws is growing as more companies such as McDonald’s and cites such as New York are facing pressure to find sustainable and eco-friendly alternatives that won’t pollute our oceans, litter our beaches or wind up harming animals.

McDonald’s shareholders on Thursday rejected a proposal that asked the fast-food giant to report on the business risks of using plastic straws and look for alternatives.

Despite the rejection, the fast-food giant  has begun experimenting with using paper straws in its U.K. restaurants and making plastic straws available only on request.

It is estimated that more than 500 million single-use plastic straws are used and thrown away every day in the U.S. alone as Americans use them at an average rate of 1.6 straws per person per day, according to the National Park Service. That translates into 175 billion straws a year.

It’s no wonder sea turtles are being found with plastic straws stuck up their noses.

Only 14% of plastic packaging is collected for recycling, and “a staggering 32% of plastic packaging escapes collection systems,” according to a 2016 study by the World Economic Forum.

A study by the University of California Santa Barbara’s National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) found that 8 million metric tons of plastic trash end up in our oceans every year. That’s equivalent to five grocery bags filled with plastic for every foot of coastline in the world.

Plastic straws are one of the top 10 plastic items found in beach cleanups every year.
Getty Images/iStockphoto

And while plastic straws represent only a fraction of the overall tonnage of ocean plastic, they are less likely to make it into recycling bins, and their small size make them dangerous for marine animals and are consumed by fish.

More: Our trash is harming the deepest fish in the ocean

More: McDonald’s shareholders vote against plastic straw study

This has led environmentalists and conservation groups to add

 

READ MORE:  https://eu.usatoday.com/story/money/nation-now/2018/05/23/sustainable-alternatives-plastic-straws-recyling/632993002/

 

 

Continue reading “Glass straws? Straw straws? Here are some eco-friendly alternatives to plastic BY:David Carrig”

Advertisements

The 10 Best Electric Cars Coming Out in 2019 Benjamin Smith

Automakers have made significant progress with their development of electric powered cars. Improvements in performance along with their range and available features that make them desirable choices is getting better with each new year. There are some exciting new electric cars that are going to be released into the market for the upcoming year. If you’re not yet a fan of these eco-friendly vehicles, there might be something on the horizon that changes your mind. This mode of power is a burgeoning wave of the future in automoive technology and we expect what is now a small ripple to become a tsunami in its magnitude in the decade to come. We bring the 10 best electric cars for 2019 list to the fore for your consideration.

1. Audi E-tron Sportback (2019)

The Audi E tron Sportback made an initial appearance at the Shanghai motor show in 2017. The concept car was a sneak peak at what would be coming down the road in 2019. It’s about the same size as the brand’s Audi A7, along with the coupe styling feature, but there will be a few notable changes. The driving position will be raised and it will assume a more aggressive stance and detailing as seen in SUV styling. If you’re concerned about the power, it comes with three electric motors that will boost the hp to 486 and when you accelerate, you’ll move from 0 to 62 in about four and a half seconds.

2. Jaguar XJ (2019)

Jaguar is getting ready for the reveal of the new XJ for 2019, which will replace its XJ luxury car with an all electric platform and no offerings for diesel or petrol alternatives. It’s the car that kicks off a new chapter in the story of the automaker. Jag will offer a five door hatch model which is a departure from the four door saloon.

3. Mini E (2019)

This will be the new revelation for the Mini experimental car that was produced in 2009 and 2010. Early models were only let out in a limited number for the purpose of testing trials. With the perfected version that is coming some ten years later, the fully electric new 2019 Mini E is

READ MORE:  https://moneyinc.com/best-electric-cars-coming-out-2019/

 

Continue reading “The 10 Best Electric Cars Coming Out in 2019 Benjamin Smith”

10 All-Natural DIY Fertilizers for Your Garden and Yard By Bruce and Jeanne Lubin

You’ve probably heard that you can use a banana peel and other compost to fertilize your garden, but did you know some items—like gelatin, coffee grounds, and even a matchbook—can have specific benefits for your plants?

gardening

Hydrogen Peroxide for Plant Roots

Help strengthen your plant’s root system with hydrogen peroxide—the extra pump of oxygen from the peroxide prevents root rot and over-watering. Just mix a tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide with 2 cups water, and water your plant with the solution. Its disinfectant properties will fend off bacteria, mold, fungus, and other nasty soil-borne diseases.

Cereal Crumb Fertilizer

Did you know that cereal crumbs are great for plants? They supply much-needed nutrients to the soil, which makes sense given that they’re grains that came from the soil in the first place! Instead of shaking the box over the trash before ripping it up for recycling, dump the remains of the flakes into your houseplants or garden for a treat they’ll love.

Make Your Own Bonemeal

As you may know, bonemeal is an excellent source of nutrients for your plants. But instead of spending $8–$10 on a bag at your local gardening store, make your own! Bonemeal is just bones, after all. Save bones from chicken, turkey, steaks, and stews, then dry them out by roasting them in a 425ºF oven for a half an hour or microwaving them on high for 1–6 minutes (depending on how many bones you have). Then place them in a plastic or paper bag and grind them up by hitting them with a hammer, then rolling them with a rolling pin. Mix the resulting powder into your soil for a life-producing treat for your plants. And you didn’t spend a cent!

A Must-Have for Growing Carrots and Tomatoes

The best thing you can give your carrot and tomato plant seeds is also what keeps you going during the day—coffee! Carrots and tomatoes both need extra nitrogen, which coffee has in spades. Mix the seeds with coffee grounds (used is fine) before you plant them. The coffee will provide your growing plants with the nitrogen they need, while having some extra bulk to plant will ensure they don’t end up all lumped together.

Slow-Release Nitrogen

For plants other than carrots and tomatoes, extra nitrogen can give them a boost, but too much can harm them. So use this nitrogen-rich DIY fertilizer that releases the nitrogen slowly into the ground. Dissolve a packet of unflavored gelatin in 3 cups warm water. Then use it to water plants in need of a little TLC. You’ll get all the benefits of an expensive fertilizer without the price tag!

Epsom Salt Lawn Fertilizer

Did you know Epsom salts are one of the best natural lawn fertilizers around? They’re composed of magnesium and sulfur, both of which are highly beneficial to grass. Magnesium kick-starts seed germination and is also a player in manufacturing chlorophyll, the substance that plants create from sunlight in order to feed themselves. Sulfur, meanwhile, also helps with

READ MORE:  https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/house-home/housekeeping/gardening/10-all-natural-diy-fertilizers-for-your-garden-and-yard

 

Continue reading “10 All-Natural DIY Fertilizers for Your Garden and Yard By Bruce and Jeanne Lubin”

Fluoride As a Neurotoxin: 9 Ways It Harms Your Brain Created by Deane Alban

woman looks surprised at a glass of water

Fluoride is a trace mineral that, in sufficient quantity, is harmful to mental health. Consider these reasons to avoid fluoridated water and toothpaste.

1. Fluoride Is a Developmental Neurotoxin

A neurotoxin is a substance that’s poisonous or destructive to the tissues in the brain, spinal cord, and nervous system.

A developmental neurotoxin is one that affects the brain during the most susceptible stages of life — before birth and during early childhood.

A recent study in The Lancet, one of the most prestigious and highly regarded medical journals, recommended that fluoride be classified as a developmental neurotoxin along with lead, mercury, arsenic, PCBs, and toluene. (4)

Study authors believe that there is a “pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity” and fluoride is a contributor.

Developmental neurotoxins are linked to increases in autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyslexia, loss of IQ points, disruptive behavior, and other cognitive impairments.

2. The Ingestion of Fluoride Lowers IQ in Children

Harvard School of Public Health and China Medical University did a joint analysis of 27 studies on the effects of fluoride and found a strong correlation between fluoride and adverse effects on brain development. (5)

Children in high-fluoride areas had significantly lower IQ scores than those living in low-fluoride areas.

This is not the only study that supports these findings.

To date, more than 50 human studies have linked fluoride to reduced IQ in both children and adults. (6)

3. Fluoride Facilitates the Entry of Aluminum Into the Brain

In the 1970s, autopsies revealed that Alzheimer’s patients had higher than normal concentrations of neurotoxic aluminum in their brains.

It’s now understood that fluoride may play a role in the aluminum-Alzheimer’s connection.

The blood-brain barrier is a semipermeable membrane designed to keep foreign substances — like fluoride and aluminum — out of the brain.

When aluminum comes into contact with fluoride, it hitches a ride into the brain as aluminum fluoride, bypassing the blood-brain barrier.

The presence of aluminum fluoride in the brain has been linked to Alzheimer’s. (7)

4. Fluoridated Drinking Water Doubles the Risk of Hypothyroidism

Fluoride, especially when added to drinking water,

READ MORE:  https://bebrainfit.com/fluoride-neurotoxin/

 

 

Continue reading “Fluoride As a Neurotoxin: 9 Ways It Harms Your Brain Created by Deane Alban”

Lyme disease

Overview

Lyme disease is caused by four main species of bacteria. Borrelia burgdorferi and Borrelia mayonii cause Lyme disease in the United States, while Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii are the leading causes in Europe and Asia. The most common tick-borne illness in these regions, Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of an infected black-legged tick, commonly known as a deer tick.

You’re more likely to get Lyme disease if you live or spend time in grassy and heavily wooded areas where ticks carrying Lyme disease thrive. It’s important to take common-sense precautions in tick-infested areas.

Symptoms

The signs and symptoms of Lyme disease vary. They usually appear in stages, but the stages can overlap.

Early signs and symptoms

A small, red bump, similar to the bump of a mosquito bite, often appears at the site of a tick bite or tick removal and resolves over a few days. This normal occurrence doesn’t indicate Lyme disease.

However, these signs and symptoms can occur within a month after you’ve been infected:

  • Rash. From three to 30 days after an infected tick bite, an expanding red area might appear that sometimes clears in the center, forming a bull’s-eye pattern. The rash (erythema migrans) expands slowly over days and can spread to 12 inches (30 centimeters) across. It’s typically not itchy or painful but might feel warm to the touch.

    Erythema migrans is one of the hallmarks of Lyme disease, although not everyone with Lyme disease develops the rash. Some people develop this rash at more than one place on their bodies.

  • Other symptoms       

READ MORE: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lyme-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20374651 Continue reading “Lyme disease”

Yes, I have a disease…

I can’t believe it happened to me! I was in the hospital two weeks long because of it. My fear was incredible! It hurts so badly!

Please subscribe to our YouTube channel, and press the bell for notifications of our upcoming videos. Thank you sincerely.

Namasté om-3312546_1280

Save the Bees Be the solution to help protect bees in crisis

Believe it or not, you have a bee to thank for every one in three bites of food you eat.

Honey bees — wild and domestic — perform about 80 percent of all pollination worldwide. A single bee colony can pollinate 300 million flowers each day. Grains are primarily pollinated by the wind, but fruits, nuts and vegetables are pollinated by bees. Seventy out of the top 100 human food crops — which supply about 90 percent of the world’s nutrition — are pollinated by bees.

“In the last four years, the chemical industry has spent $11.2 million on a PR initiative to say it’s not their fault, so we know whose fault it is.”
Jon Cooksey, writer, director, How to Boil a Frog.

What’s Killing the Bees — and Why It Matters

Worldwide bee colony collapse is not as big a mystery as the chemical industry claims.

The systemic nature of the problem makes it complex, but not impenetrable. Scientists know that bees are dying from a variety of factors—pesticides, drought, habitat destruction, nutrition deficit, air pollution, global warming and more. Many of these causes are interrelated. The bottom line is that we know humans are largely responsible for the two most prominent causes: pesticides and habitat loss.

Worker bees (females) live about six weeks in summer and several months in the winter. Colonies produce new worker bees continuously during the spring and summer, and then reproduction slows during the winter. Typically, a bee hive or colony will decline by 5-10 percent over the winter, and replace those lost bees in the spring. In a bad year, a bee colony might lose 15-20 percent of its bees.

In the U.S., winter losses have commonly reached 30-50 percent, in some cases more. In 2006, David Hackenberg — a bee keeper for 42 years — reported a 90 percent die-off among his 3,000 hives. U.S. National Agricultural Statistics show a honey bee decline from about 6 million hives in 1947 to 2.4 million hives in 2008, a 60 percent reduction.

The number of working bee colonies per hectare provides a critical metric of crop health. In the U.S. — among crops that require bee pollination — the number of bee colonies per hectare has declined by 90 percent since 1962. The bees cannot keep pace with the winter die-off rates and habitat loss.

Pesticides and Bees

Biologists have found more than 150 different chemical residues in bee pollen, a deadly “pesticide cocktail” according to University of California apiculturist Eric Mussen. The chemical companies Bayer, Syngenta, BASF, Dow, DuPont and Monsanto shrug their shoulders at the systemic complexity, as if the mystery were too complicated. They advocate no change in pesticide policy. After all, selling poisons to the world’s farmers is profitable.

Furthermore, wild bee habitat shrinks every year as

READ MORE:  https://www.greenpeace.org/usa/sustainable-agriculture/save-the-bees/