I GOT MYSELF OFF ANTIDEPRESSANTS THE NATURAL WAY—AND I’M NEVER LOOKING BACK By Rachel Lapidos

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It was a few months ago when I was taking my antidepressant—just as I did every night for the past five years—and realized I didn’t really want to be on it anymore.The shrink who’d prescribed it to me had never said I’d need to take it forever (though no one had said I wouldn’t). But that night, surveying my new thinking about all of this in the moment I swallowed it down, I wondered: had it become a habit, or even a crutch in my life, rather than a necessity for a serious depression? (Answer: In my case, probably.) So how would I safely get off it?

This is my brain on drugs

I think I should say that while some people might need a mood-regulator or a SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) for super-solid chemical reasons, I think I needed an antidepressant for environmental ones. One reason? My situation has become entirely different than it was when I was first prescribed Lexapro, a common SSRI variant. And it’s made a big difference. Boxes have been checked, and I’m essentially where I want to be—I have a great job, a great boyfriend, great friends. My mood matches my pretty decent reality. And my reality, even when sucky things happen now, doesn’t totally steamroll my mood (or total sense of self).

I was curious: could my pretty healthy exercise and eating habits (along with my sporadic attempts at meditation) provide enough mood-boosting wind in my sails?

That’s not to say I’m not still depressed, of course. High-functioning depression is a very real thing, after all. I just feel like I’m in a better place, and more capable of not having to rely on pills to be truly happy. And more importantly, I wanted to test if this was true.

Intellectually, I’d gotten some confidence for going off the Lexapro from things I was learning on the wellness beat at work. My theory: I probably produce a really steady stream of happiness-boosting endorphins, since I’d become an avid attendee of HIIT workouts, and I also avoid enough inflammatory foods to naturally level me out—so why not reduce the number of chemicals I’m ingesting?

And after learning more about the connection between the gut and depression, I was curious as to whether my pretty healthy exercise and eating habits (along with my sporadic attempts at meditation) could provide enough mood-boosting wind in my sails.

So I set out to stop using the medication that had leveled me out for years—which honestly felt like going into battle without any armor.

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The problem with discontinuing antidepressants

But you can’t just stop taking the pills. I’ve had occasions in which I had missed a couple of doses, and felt significant changes in my brain chemistry (some Googling produced the term “brain zaps,” which quite accurately described the weird and uncomfortable sensation you can feel after skipped doses).

So I had no illusions that the process of getting off antidepressants is complex, and not something that should be done without a doctor’s supervision. I went to see Meredith Bergman, M.D., a holistic psychiatrist, to see what I should do.

Dr. Bergman is really approachable and communicative for a shrink; not at all like the MD who gave me Lexapro, four minutes of his time, and a good-luck pat on the back. But she didn’t sugar coat this info: “Drug companies do not conduct research into how to taper off these medications, leading some physicians unprepared and without specific protocols for doing so,” she told me in her cozy New York City office. “This can lead to

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.wellandgood.com/good-advice/getting-off-antidepressants-the-natural-way/slide/3/

How journal writing helped me get out of depression by Healthy Living Writer: Brent Williams

Writer: Brent Williams

I lay in bed after yet another long troubled night’s sleep—utterly exhausted, lacking all motivation. A few feet away sat a school notebook. It felt unreachable, but somehow a small spark in my brain thought it was worth trying. I reached out, picked up my pen, and started to write. I wrote how I had no energy to think, let alone express my thoughts in words.

I wrote how heavy and stuck my body felt that morning. Metaphors and descriptions followed, giving some shape to this amorphous life-draining force.

And somehow it helped. Just enough for me to distinguish between what depression wanted me to do—the urge to head back to bed was so strong—and what I needed to do to help myself that day. I got up, made myself some breakfast, and went out and sat in the sun to eat. A seagull glided effortlessly overhead. I smiled. The day was possible.

What writing did for me
• It got me out of bed in the morning, which was so important for getting me into a good wake/sleep cycle.
• I went places to write, so I felt less trapped and isolated.
• I expressed my emotions, my most private thoughts, and internal conflicts.
• I described my pain and in doing so freed myself from it a little.
• It brought depression, its characteristics, and influences into the open so I could see and work to address them.
• It gave me companionship.
• I felt a sense of purpose and achievement.
• It encouraged me to look after myself and recognize when I was not doing so.
• I identified important needs, such as the need to see a doctor and a therapist.
• It enabled me to see and express my destructive thoughts rather than act on them.
• I got practical feedback on what was working and what was not.
• It gave me a small but valuable sense of control over an illness that made me feel so powerless.

Your brain when you suffer from anxiety and depression
The brain is made up of billions of cells and connecting pathways constantly communicating with each other in a complex, finely tuned way to regulate your body and all of its functions. When going well, it is miraculous. In depression, however, the communication goes seriously awry. Your senses, thoughts, actions, and emotions are all compromised. So much so that for many, overriding the basic human need to survive becomes a very sensible option.

It’s like depression has slowly and by stealth hijacked your brain. The pathways it creates become strong, pulling more and more better functioning parts of your brain down with it. In small but important ways the simple act of expressing yourself with words enlists parts of your brain that begin to reverse this downward spiral.

Why you got depressed, how it manifests, and what is the best way to get out of it is, in part, unique to you. Observing your own particular influences through journal writing develops awareness, and this not only helps your recovery now, it better protects you against future relapses.

Expressing your thoughts and emotions, gaining little insights from your writing, feeling a sense of achievement, establishing good routines; these all change your brain chemistry in small but critical ways for the better. As you build on these, you slowly strengthen your recovery and help yourself out of depression.

Tips for writing while depressed
• Write freely, knowing it is for you only.
• If you feel too stuck to write, just write how “stuck” feels.
• Any effort is good—there is no standard.
• Be honest, but be kind to yourself, too. Don’t beat yourself up; depression is doing a good job of that.
• Write about your little successes.
• Write when you wake up

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.lakehealthyliving.com/how-journal-writing-helped-me-get-out-of-depression/

A Little Information one Seasonal Affective Disorder

DISCLAIMER – THIS ARTICLE IS NOT IN ANY WAY TO TAKE THE PLACE OF OR CHANGE WHATEVER YOUR MEDICAL PRACTITIONER HAS SUGGESTED OR FOR YOU TO QUIT TAKING ANY MEDICATION(S) YOU MAY BE ON FOR DEPRESSION, ANXIETY, PTSD. SILVER SAGE WITCH. LADY BELTANE, WITCHES OF THE CRAFT AND/OR COVEN LIFE  AND/OR NewFound-Life STAFF AND NOT LIABLE FOR ANY DECISION YOU MAKE ON THE TOPICS IN THIS POST. WE ARE NOT LIABLE IF YOU QUIT TAKING YOUR PRESCRIBED MEDICATION TO USE ONLY CRYSTALS AND/OR HERBS TO TREAT YOUR CONDITION. IT WAS WRITTEN ONLY TO SHINE SOME LIGHT ON SAD.

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SAD or Seasonal Affective Disorder covers many seasons and things including depression, anxiety, and more PTSD to name a few. I myself have clinical depression, an anxiety disorder, and PTSD (from being raped 3 different times and my mother trying to suffocate me right before she tried to take her own life in 1971 after my father’s passing a year before). Many of us with different phobias and/or emotional problems are told, “Buck up and move on” or, “My favorite you can’t be disabled I can’t see anything wrong with you.” Just because we can walk unaided, see with out help, hear again without help, but it is what we try to cover over so we don’t have to hear unkind comments many of us just never leave our homes.

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You can help a friend or even a stranger by being an ear to listen to them and not judging them for what they need to say. You could find out about a home bound person possibly through a local church or even online. You could arrange to bring lunch or dinner once a week staying to eat with them so they have some kind of human contact. Usually when you get paired with someone you receive their phone number not their address this so you can make a connection via talking and work up to having a meal with them find out what they miss by not being able to leave home, i.e. sweets, reading material, word search or crossword puzzle books, etc.

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Do not judge a person you know because the seem really down or stressed to the max instead ask them, “Is there anything I can do to help you? I’m hear to listen anytime you need to talk.” If someone you know seems very depressed or stressed you may want to suggest they see their doctor to talk about how they are feeling.” Also offer to drive them if you can so they know someone cares enough to honestly want to help them not out of duty or you feel you have to, do because you want to help and you care about the person.

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I am here for you I will listen if you need or want to talk to someone just email me WitchesCovenHearts@yahoo.com and we will set up a time and how we will connect.

DISCLAIMER – THIS ARTICLE IS NOT IN ANY WAY TO TAKE THE PLACE OF OR CHANGE WHATEVER YOUR MEDICAL PRACTITIONER HAS SUGGESTED OR FOR YOU TO QUIT TAKING ANY MEDICATION(S) YOU MAY BE ON FOR DEPRESSION, ANXIETY, PTSD. SILVER SAGE WITCH, LADY BELTANE, WITCHES OF THE CRAFT AND/OR COVEN LIFE AND/OR NEWFOUND-LIFE STAFF AND NOT LIABLE FOR ANY DECISION YOU MAKE ON THE TOPICS IN THIS POST. WE ARE NOT LIABLE IF YOU QUIT TAKING YOUR PRESCRIBED MEDICATION TO USE ONLY CRYSTALS AND/OR HERBS TO TREAT YOUR CONDITION. IT WAS WRITTEN ONLY TO SHINE SOME LIGHT ON SAD.

 

Surprising Ways Loneliness Can Actually Kill You

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Can loneliness kill you? It might seem hard to believe that spending time away from people could cut your life short. Research, however, shows that older adults who don’t spend enough time with family and friends are more likely to feel sick, miserable, and apathetic. They’re less likely to take care of themselves. And they actually die earlier than they would if they maintained healthier social lives.

 

1. Loneliness increases your chances of becoming depressed
Depressed young woman crying| Katarzyna Bialasiewicz/iStock/Getty Images Plus

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.cheatsheet.com/health-fitness/surprising-ways-loneliness-can-actually-kill-you.html/

What is depression? By The NHS

Everyone has spells of feeling down, but depression is more than just spending a few days feeling sad or unhappy. Depression can make you feel persistently sad and down for weeks or months at a time.

While some people believe that depression is trivial or not a genuine health problem, it’s actually a real condition that affects around one in 10 people over the course of their lives. It impacts people of all genders and ages – including children. Studies show that around 4% of children in the UK between the ages of five and 16 are depressed or anxious.

With the right support and treatment, most people recover fully from depression.

Do I have depression?

Depression has a range of different symptoms, and it can affect everybody differently. The symptoms include feeling very tearful, feeling hopelessness and sadness, and losing interest in things you enjoyed before. It’s also common for people with depression to have symptoms of anxiety.

Physical symptoms happen with depression too – these can include feeling tired all the time, getting poor sleep, losing your sex drive, losing your appetite, and feeling aches and pains.

If the symptoms are mild, you might simply experience a persistent low mood. It’s common to feel stressed, sad or anxious during difficult times in your life, and a low mood can get better after a short time, rather than being a symptom of depression.

Learn more about low mood and depression here.

Severe symptoms of depression can make people feel suicidal

READ MORE HERE: https://www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/mental-health/depression

CRYSTALS THE POWER OF AMETHYST HEALING PROPERTIES BY HEATHER ASKINOSIE

Amethyst Healing Properties

Amethyst crystals are generally one of the first gems people are attracted to when begin their crystal healing journey. This doesn’t come as much of a surprise since amethyst healing properties have been valued for thousands of years. As early as 25,000 B.C, the Neolithic people in Europe and the ancient Egyptians prized it for its beauty and legendary energies. Greek and Roman societies also placed high value on the Amethyst healing powers. It has long been considered a gemstone of royalty, being used in the crowns, scepters and rings of bishops.  Amethyst is said to have been the ninth stone in the breastplate of the high priest of Israel, and one of the ten stones upon which the names of the tribes of Israel were engraved. With all this rich history, there must be a reason so many different ancient civilizations harnessed the properties of Amethyst.

Amethyst Healing Properties

Meditate with Amethyst

Amethyst crystals are exceptional for providing spiritual protection, inner strength and clarity of mind, making them a classic meditation tool. Meditating with them can help you to become more in tune with your feelings, helping you to get to know yourself on a much deeper level. It also stimulates the crown chakra and calms your thoughts, making it a powerful aid in meditation.

Relieve Stress and Relax

Amethyst healing properties also include acting as a natural form of stress relief. This crystal attracts positive energy while ridding your body of any negative emotions—feelings of stress, anxiety, fear, depression and more. The healing properties of Amethyst help to clear your body’s energy field of all negative energies and influences, acting as an energetic shield that creates a bubble of spiritual light around your body.

Amethyst healing properties

Place Amethyst in Your Home

Aside from what they can do for your body, amethyst crystals are one of the most beneficial stones to have in your environment. Due to this, many people fill their homes with them—in their bedroom, living room, bathroom, car, office, meditation room etc.—so that the amethyst healing properties constantly surround and protect them. These crystals work to purify any space of negative vibrations, emanating an energy ideal for you to thrive in. They help to clear the mind of unnecessary thoughts and clutter. On a physical level, having amethyst crystals in your home is believed to help strengthen the immune system and heal any imbalances that lie in the body.

Amethyst clusters and Amethyst geodes carry the strongest power to rid your home of negative energy, making them the best ones to fill your home with. These crystals can be placed on your fireplace or your altar—somewhere central in your house, so that the amethyst healing properties can radiate to every room. They also make wonderful additions to a child’s

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.energymuse.com/blog/amethyst-healing-properties/

 

 

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD)

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD)

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Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which is only experienced at certain times of the year, usually in autumn and winter, has an negative impact on your mood. Treatment can often make a big difference.

What is seasonal affective disorder (SAD)?

SAD is a type of depression that comes and goes according to the season. People with SAD have symptoms of depression or mania at roughly the same time each year.

SAD usually develops in autumn and winter, then disappears in spring and summer. In some people, the symptoms develop in spring and early summer.

People with mental illness might find their symptoms change at different times of the year. For example, some people with bipolar disorder find they are more likely to experience mania in spring and summer and depression in winter.

What are the symptoms of SAD?

Symptoms usually start out mild and get worse as the season progresses. When the season changes, people normally become completely well again.

Symptoms of SAD in winter include:

  • lack of energy
  • sleeping too much
  • finding it hard to wake up in the morning
  • feeling very tired all the time
  • overeating and craving carbohydrates
  • gaining weight
  • losing interest in normal activities

Symptoms of SAD in summer include:

What causes SAD?

SAD is thought to be caused by changes to the body’s circadian rhythms (its ‘body clock’) at certain times of the year. It may also happen because in winter the body produces less of the

READ MORE HERE: https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/seasonal-affective-disorder