What makes graveyards scary? Why graveyards are scary?

Under the wat­chful gaze of crumbling saints and baby-f­aced cherubs, you hurry down a path lined with mausoleums. Eventually, you pass crops of headstones glinting in the moonlight, each engraved with the CliffsNotes version of the dead person’s life. You practically run past sunken graves and dying flowers, hoping upon hope that the sound you hear is just the wind and trying to shake the feeling that something is following close on your heels.

All right, so maybe you’ve never taken a midnight shortcut through the local cemetery. But if you have ever set foot in a graveyard, you’ve likely felt a hint of the fear and uneasiness that is their legacy. Maybe you were attending a family funeral, touring historic graveyards or simply fleeing flying silver spheres and hooded dwarves.

­Whatever your reason for strolling among the tombstones, you probably felt something noteworthy about the experience — something different from all the other spaces and places that fill our lives. After all, graveyards are the final resting place for many of our dead. People say their last goodbyes there, sometimes returning year after year to leave flowers or say a few words.

No matter where you travel in the world, cemeteries frequently are silent and solemn settings. Whether the grounds are finely manicured or left to the weeds, graveyards exist as the place where the living contemplate the mysteries, tra­umas and heartbreaks associated with death.

­But why are so many people afraid of graveyards? Is it the thought of all those decaying bodies under the dirt or the idea of a bony arm emerging from the soil to grab your ankle and pull you into the underworld ? Or is it something deeper? On the next page, we’ll travel to a place full of dark secrets and hidden skeletons: the human brain.

What do cemeteries symbolize?

Cats often receive a bum rap for hanging out in cemeteries, but can we really blame them? After all, graveyards offer great feline amenities: choice napping spots, scratching trees and a generous selection of small animals to prey on. What would an 8-pound (3.6-kg) tabby want with your grandfather’s soul when there are so many squirrels around?

cats in the graveyard
© iStockphoto.com/syntesis
Spooky necropolis or just prime catnapping territory?

­To cats, graveyards may just be another place to sleep away the afternoon, but to humans, they represent the mystery and the outrage of mortality. Like it or not, we’re all going to die. You may think you’ve accepted that fact, but it’s an issue humanity has struggled with for millennia. Unable to avoid it, we’ve tried to figure out what lies beyond its

READ MORE HERE:

 

Advertisements

The Human Skeleton

The human skeleton is made up of 206 bones. The functions of the skeleton are to provide support, give our bodies shape, provide protection to other systems and organs of the body, to provide attachments for muscles, to produce movement and to produce red blood cells.

 

GCSE PE Bones of the skeleton

The main bones of the human skeleton are:

  • The Skull – Cranium, Mandible, and Maxilla
  • Shoulder girdle – clavicle and scapula – humerus, radius, and ulna
  • Hand – Carpals, Metacarpals, and

READ MORE HERE:

 

How to Honor the Dead – Alma

By T Kira Madden

Here’s a secret: I wear my father’s clothes every day. Not entire outfits, but a garment or two, always. I wear his striped t-shirts to bed at night, his vibrant dress socks under my boots. I’ve tailored his button-up shirts to fit me in the shoulders; I’ve removed a link or two from his bracelets. Yes, I am ashamed to admit, I have even worn his underwear. But that was only once, and, well, I happen to wear Calvin Klein briefs, too. I wear his jade pinky ring on my ring finger, and his army tag necklace never comes off my neck.

I thumb the words: MADDEN, JOHN L, #11500138, JEWISH.

Why the hell does it say Jewish? I asked my mother when she gave me this tag.

Because they had to know how to honor the dead, she replied, in case he died.

My father has been dead for one year five months and 12 days, as I write this. It was his lungs, not the army. I don’t have to check the calendar, or count, because my body knows. Each day, I think, I am not doing grief right. I am wading too slowly through this, or, at moments, too quickly, or not at all. My grief is selfish, my grief is smaller than other griefs, it is unjustified, my time for sadness is up; everybody dies, so it’s absurd to feel this bad, that my situation is unlike all others. Spoiler alert: That is grief talking, and none of this is true.

Every single day since November 2, 2015, I have asked myself that same question: How do I best honor the dead?

Because that army tag was incorrect. My father didn’t want a religious ceremony

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.heyalma.com/how-to-honor-the-dead/

Coping with the Loss of a Familiar Author: Lady Abigail Welcher

 Lady Abigail Welcher

 

*Recently I was asked a question: how do you cope with the loss of a beloved familiar? I hope this helps any who might be dealing with this painful time in life.

Given the intense bond each of us share with our familiar, it’s natural that we will feel devastated by feelings of grief and sadness when a familiar dies. While some people may not understand the depth of feeling we have for our familiars, you should never feel guilty or ashamed about grieving for an animal friend.

Here are some healthy ways to cope with the loss, and how to comfort yourself and others, and begin the process of moving on with love. Do not apologize for your grief. For the grief for a familiar is the same broken heart you would have for any family member or loved one.

For many people, our familiars are not “just a dog” or “just a cat” or even “a pet.” Familiars are beloved members of the family and, when they die, you feel a significant, even traumatic loss. The level of grief depends on factors such as your age and personality, the age of your pet, and the circumstances of their death. Generally, the more significant the loss, the more intense the grief you’ll feel.

Grief can be complicated by the role the familiar played in your life. For example, if your familiar was a working dog or a helper animal such as a guide dog, then you’ll not only be grieving the loss of a companion but also the loss of a coworker or the loss of your independence. If you cared for your pet through a protracted illness, you likely grew to love him or her even more. If you lived alone and the pet was your only companion, coming to terms with his loss can be even harder. If you were unable to afford expensive veterinary treatment to prolong the life of your pet, you may even feel a profound sense of guilt.

Accept your Grief

Grieving is a personal and highly individual experience. Some people find grief comes in stages, where they experience different feelings such as denial, anger, guilt, depression, and eventually acceptance and resolution. Others find that grief is more cyclical, coming in waves, or a series of highs and lows. The lows are likely to be deeper and longer at the beginning and then gradually become shorter and less intense as time goes by. Still, even years after a loss, a sight, a sound, or a special anniversary can spark memories that trigger a strong sense of grief.

The grieving process happens only gradually. It can’t be forced or hurried—and there is no “normal” timetable for grieving. Some people start to feel better in weeks or months. For others, the grieving process is measured in years. Whatever your grief experience, it’s important to be patient with yourself and allow the process to naturally unfold.

Feeling sad, frightened, or lonely is a normal reaction to the loss of a beloved pet. Exhibiting these feelings doesn’t mean you are weak, so you shouldn’t feel ashamed. Trying to ignore your pain or keep it from surfacing will only make it worse in the long run. For real healing, it is necessary to face your grief and actively deal with it. By expressing your grief, you’ll likely need less time to heal than if you withhold or “bottle up” your feelings. Write about your feelings and talk with others about them.

Sorrow and grief are normal and natural responses to death. Like grief for humans, grief for familiar companions can only be dealt with over time, but there are healthy ways to cope with the pain. Here are some suggestions:

Don’t let anyone tell you how to feel, and don’t tell yourself how to feel either. Your grief is your own, and no one else can tell you when it’s time to “move on” or “get over it.” Let yourself feel whatever you feel without embarrassment or judgment. It’s okay to be angry, to cry or not to cry. It’s also okay to laugh, to find moments of joy, and to let go when you’re ready.

Reach out to others who have lost pets. Check out online message boards, pet loss hotlines, and pet loss support groups. If your own friends, family members, therapist, or clergy do not work well with the grief of pet loss, find someone who does.

Rituals can help healing.

A passing ritual like a funeral can help you and your family members openly express your feelings. Ignore people who think it’s inappropriate to hold a funeral for a pet, and do what feels right for you. Have a small ritual of love and releasing. Let each family member explain how much they loved and cared for the familiar. Release their spirit unto the Goddess/God you work with and let them know you will welcome them home with love if they wish to come.

Create a legacy. Preparing a memorial, planting a tree in memory of your familiar, compiling a photo album or scrapbook, or otherwise sharing the memories you enjoyed with your familiar, can create a legacy to celebrate the life of your a familiar companion.

Look after yourself. The stress of losing a familiar can quickly deplete your energy and emotional reserves. Looking after your physical and emotional needs will help you get through this difficult time. Eat a healthy diet, get plenty of sleep, and exercise regularly to release endorphins and help boost your mood.

If you have other familiars, try to maintain your normal routine. Other pets and familiars can become distressed by your sorrow as well as by the absence of their soul mate. Maintaining their daily routines, or even increasing exercise and play times, will not only benefit the surviving familiars but may also help to elevate your outlook also.

Try to find new meaning and joy in life. Caring for a familiar previously occupied your time and boosted your morale, spiritual optimism. Try to fill the time by volunteering, picking up a long-neglected hobby, taking a class, helping friends care for their pets, or even by getting another pet when the time feels right.

Stay connected with friends. Familiars, can help you stay regularly connect with friends and neighbors while out on a walk or in the dog park, for example. Having lost your familiar, it’s important that you don’t now spend day after day alone. Try to spend time with at least one person every day. Regular face-to-face contact can help you ward off depression and stay positive. Call up an old friend or neighbor for a lunch date or join a club.

Boost your vitality with exercise. Our familiars help us especially older adults stay active and playful, which can boost your immune system and increase your energy. It’s important to keep up your activity levels after the loss of your friend. {Check with your doctor before starting an exercise program and then find an activity that you enjoy. Exercising in a group—by playing a sport such as tennis or golf, or taking an exercise or swimming class—can also help you connect with others.}

Loss is

READ MORE HERE: http://www.witchvox.com/va/dt_va.html?a=usin&c=words&id=15481

 

We fear death, but what if dying isn’t as bad as we think? By Jessica Brown

Research comparing perceptions of death with accounts of those imminently facing it suggest that maybe we shouldn’t worry so much about our own end

Death terrifies many of us, but is, of course, central to the human condition. What if it’s not as bad as we fear?
 Death terrifies many of us, but is, of course, central to the human condition. What if it’s not as bad as we fear? Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

“The idea of death, the fear of it, haunts the human animal like nothing else,” wrote Earnest Becker in his book, The Denial of Death. It’s a fear strong enough to compel us to force kale down our throats, run sweatily on a treadmill at 7am on a Monday morning, and show our genitals to a stranger with cold hands and a white coat if we feel something’s a little off.

But our impending end isn’t just a benevolent supplier of healthy behaviours. Researchers have found death can determine our prejudices, whether we give to charity or wear sun cream, our desire to be famous, what type of leader we vote for, how we name our children and even how we feel about breastfeeding.

And, of course, it terrifies us. Death anxiety appears to be at the core of several mental health disorders, including health anxiety, panic disorder and depressive disorders. And we’re too scared to talk about it. A ComRes survey from 2014 found that eight in ten Brits are uncomfortable talking about death, and only a third have written a will.

But we don’t need to worry so much, according to new research comparing our perception of what it’s like to die with the accounts people facing imminent death. Researchers analysed the writing of regular bloggers with either terminal cancer or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) who all died over the course of the study, and compared it to blog posts written by a group of participants who were told to imagine they had been diagnosed with terminal cancer and only had only a few months to live. They looked for general feelings of positivity and negativity, and words describing positive and negative emotions including happiness, fear and terror.

Casket or Coffin: What’s the Difference? – Funeral Guide

When you are arranging a funeral for your loved, you might find yourself having to choose between a casket or coffin.

Choosing a coffin is a basic part of funeral planning, and people usually consider a range of factors to help them decide.

Are coffins and caskets the same thing?

The words coffin and casket can both be used to describe a container for cremation or burial.

The only real difference between a coffin and a casket in the sense that most people tend to use the words, is the shape. A coffin’s shape is tapered along the lines of the

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.funeralguide.co.uk/help-resources/arranging-a-funeral/funeral-guides/casket-or-coffin-whats-the-difference

The doctor, barrister, civil servant and Cambridge academic who say they have proof there’s an afterlife By: THERESA CHEUNG FOR THE DAILY MAIL

A group of women sit at a table, sipping coffee and talking animatedly. One is a doctor, another a barrister. A third, Jane Clark, 49, is a no-nonsense civil servant — so you might imagine these high-flying women are here to network, or are members of a school PTA.

Yet nothing could be further from the truth. Rather, for the next hour, they will discuss how best to connect with the departed and debate the scientific evidence for the existence of Heaven.

‘We’re not sitting in an old-fashioned gypsy caravan, looking into a glass ball,’ says Jane. ‘We’re all professional, educated women. I work in a team handling large contracts and am the type of person who questions things and looks for evidence. I’m logical and think things through. But I also believe that the human spirit can live on beyond death.’

People have been fascinated by the concept of what lies ‘beyond the grave’ for centuries. While there are those who are sceptical about the existence of an afterlife, many — even if they

READ MORE:  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-5129875/women-believe-prove-theres-life-death.html

Continue reading “The doctor, barrister, civil servant and Cambridge academic who say they have proof there’s an afterlife By: THERESA CHEUNG FOR THE DAILY MAIL”

Jamoraquai

Hello World! :)

When the pen takes control.

Events, submissions, self-penned bits.

Ascension's blog

SPIRITUALITY AND LIFE COACH

ellisnelson

children's author

ACCREDITED SENIOR PSYCHOTHERAPIST/COUNSELLOR -Dr.Fawzy Masaoud-LONDON, ENGLAND

NO DESPAIR WITH LIFE AND NO LIFE WITH DESPAIR . Email: dr.fawzyclinic2019@yahoo.com

TheEnlightenedMind622

Open Your Mind

Dating

Dating Tips for Everyone

Sexuality

Sexuality and Dating

Albarakah Mart

Find amazing and usefull daily aacessories and utilities

Brain Warfare

Spiritual isn't non-physical, it's an elevation of the physical

unbolt me

the literary asylum

THE MIND OF RD REVILO

Conscious Thought: Driven by Intelligent Awareness

irevuo

art. popular since 10,000 BC

Rain Coast Review

Thoughts on my life... by Donald B. Wilson