5 Home Remedies For When Your Dog Has A Cold | by Lady Bug

http://petslady.com/articles/home_remedies_when_your_dog_has_cold_59285

Why do we have daylight saving time? The 100-year history. By Erin Blakemore

Get the facts about springing forward and falling back, a tradition that was established in the U.S. in 1918.

People in the United States will feel a bit more refreshed on November 4 as daylight saving time 2018 ends. The clocks fall back at 2 a.m. ET on Sunday, ushering in three months of getting up in the dark until the winter solstice welcomes back the sun on December 22.

You’ve probably heard that Ben Franklin kind of proposed daylight saving time (also erroneously called daylight savings time) centuries before it was implemented, and that the twice-yearly switch was initially adopted to save us money on energy needs.

But if you dig deeper, you’ll find out that the daylight-hoarding tradition—which was adopted in the United States a hundred years ago—has an even more colorful

READ MORE HERE:

https://relay.nationalgeographic.com/proxy/distribution/public/amp/news/2018/03/daylight-savings-time-arizona-florida-spring-forward-science

How to Make Dried Apple and Orange Slices | How to Make and Do

Here’s how to dry apple slices and orange slices for use in swags, wreaths and fragrant potpourri.

Dried fruit slices and peels are a great way to give your home a country prim look. They are fragrant and can be added to potpourri blends, fixings blends, wreaths or swags. They also make pretty and fragrant gift package decorations. When they are placed around candles, especially bakery candles, they give a nice country prim look.

The picture shown at right is an orange fixings blend. It combines dried orange slices and orange peels with fragrant spices like cinnamon sticks, allspice, and cloves. The look and smell is very seasonal and makes a great addition to country prim home decor.

The easiest way to dry fruit slices is to use a dehydrator

READ MORE HERE:

https://howtomakedo.net/248/how-to-make-dried-apple-and-orange-slices/

THE VEIL IS THINNING…ARE YOU READY? By Kimberly McGrath

Have you been extra tired, drained generally not feeling well?  I know I have been.  Yes, I am getting over either a mild flu or a really bad cold, the weather has changed drastically since the Autumnal Equinox a few weeks ago and I really believe that has a effect on our physical bodies.  In addition, astronomers have been saying that we have been having Solar Flares (when the Sun sends of little explosions) and reportedly that has an effect on our energy levels.   Solar winds also blow across the Earth and this electromagnetic energy wakes us up during the night and helps us have crazy dreams.  Have you been having crazy dreams?  I know mine have been off the chain- including the haunting Bird/Duck dream that I had two nights ago and I just cannot seem to shake the symbolism. You are not the only one and a few of my friends even asked me about some of their wild dreams this week and what the symbolism is.

Mostly everyone is dreaming about animals or spirits on the other side.  Well, it is that time of year again, when the Veil between our (physical) world and that of the Other Side becomes so thin that our our loved ones, our Spirit Guides and Animal Totems have much easier access to us and our subconscious and physical existence.  So, if your dreams are wild and you are being woke up in the middle of the night, don’t be surprised if you are having visitations – they will only get stronger leading up to All Hallow’s Eve.  These disturbances usually occur between 2 and 3 a.m. when we are asleep and most relaxed, there is little or no traffic outside, electronics are turned off, the world is quiet and there is no interference.  All Hallow’s Eve or Samhain (pronounced Sawen) is followed by Dia de los Muertos or Day of the Dead, where it is believed that our ancestors come to feast on gifts that we provide for them and some celebrate All Saints Day, where you honor religious saints instead of your ancestors.  Either way, it is our job in the living, to provide offerings – thus the candy that is served to all of the little goblins that come knocking.

The Thinning of the Veil occurs all during the year, but more so during certain times when the Moon is Full or Eclipsing, certain planetary alignments and astronomical/astrological phenomena, solar flaring, big storms also create intense energy and act as an energetic conductor to allow spirit activity to cross over into our physical world.  People can experience increased visual phenomena, sounds, sights, smells and mostly feel the energy.  It is a time to pay attention to your senses.  No you are not going crazy and we all have the ability to pick up and sense spirit, you just have to be open to it, grounded and quiet. When we are rushing around crazy going about our daily life, we are so distracted be external stimuli that we miss most of what is really going on around us.  You may be hypersensitive and emotional when the Veil is Thin and not aware where your feelings are coming from – don’t be surprised if you are picking up energy.  Now is a time where you may experience unbelievable things; you may witness objects moving, alarms clocks going off when they are not supposed to, phones ringing with no one actually on the other end, lights and electronics randomly turning on and off and your pets could be going nuts and barking or chasing invisible playmates.  Also, do not be surprised if items go missing even when you knew exactly where you placed them and then suddenly reappear later in the day or the next day in some bizarre place that you know you did not put them.  Look at this time of the year as a lucky opportunity for signs and messages from your loved ones.  I even go as far as asking for specific signs from specific loved ones so I know they are here with me- I know they are, but my busy life has me not always paying attention.  This is a good time for me to purposely reconnect with them as the Thin Veil makes it easier for them to communicate

READ MORE HERE:  http://www.expressionsoftheuniverse.com/the-veil-is-thinning-are-you-ready/

 

 

Understanding the Symbolism of the Acorn By: Nora Mueller

For many, the unassuming acorns that fall from an oak tree are the bane of those with driveways and front lawns that they’d like to keep clean underfoot. But in recent years, there has been a growing trend towards finding an alternative use for acorns, rather than just raking them together in a seemingly endless heap.

In many ways, acorns are the crystallization of the recent wild, foraged food trend; they are frequently considered an annoyance (like nettles) but are secretly a superfood– a gluten-free nut and grain alternative that’s high in amino acids.

Acorns can also be stored in their shells for years, and– when properly treated– can be used in a multitude of recipes, infusing nutrients and essential vitamins wherever they are added.

Eating acorns is, of course, not a recent trend; along with their progenitor, the oak tree, they have long been revered as a resource, with a rich history in mythologies around the world. In Sanskrit, the word for oak evokes the concept of thunder, life, soul, and spirit; for the Druids, the oak tree was the most sacred tree– so much so that historians believe the word “Druid” itself is from the Celtic word for “acorn”. Abundant as they are, it’s little surprise that acorns have long been consumed both as a delicacy and as an everyday meal.

Acorns are a token of nature’s alchemical magic: a tiny, hardened nut transforms into a tall, wizened tree.

In America, most people know that Native American tribes– particularly those in California– make use of acorns, cooking them into porridge, pancakes, cakes, breads, soups, and patties.

But internationally, different cultures across the world have found their own ways of adopting the nut and incorporating it into their cuisine: in Korea, acorns are transformed into a jelly known as dotorimuk while in Turkey acorns are buried in the dirt to remove tannins (which is the compound that gives acorns their bitter taste) before being washed, dried, and ground with spices into a drink known as raccahout.

Outside of direct human consumption, acorns also have had an important culinary role: jamon iberico, derived from pigs raised on acorns, is considered a Spanish specialty, and oak trees are being planted to help support truffle production. Historically, acorns have also enjoyed uses outside of the gustatory world, used as dye and prepared into a medicine taken by Native American elders to promote longevity.

Today, acorns are becoming more of a mainstream commodity as foraging increasingly becomes a popular activity, one that has spread beyond the realm of picking berries and gathering mushrooms.

Acorns are cropping up in classic recipes (acorn mousse anyone?), especially as acorn flour becomes more readily available and mechanization has cut out the long and arduous process of leaching tannins by oneself (which in days of yore could sometimes take months).

If you do want to

READ MORE HERE:  https://gardencollage.com/nourish/farm-to-table/acorns-ultimate-forgeable-fall-food/