Poinsettia: History and Tradition of the Christmas Flower

By FloraQueen

For some reason, Christmas isn’t always imagined as a time for flowers. Due to the December cold, many flowers don’t bloom outside and we tend to put more focus on winter foliage like pine, mistletoe and holly. However, there’s one big exception when it comes to Christmas flowers in the shape of the humble poinsettia.

Now in terms of definition, we are cheating a little as the poinsettia is not really a flower, but is instead a red-topped plant. However, it still manages to

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https://www.floraqueen.com/blog/poinsettia-christmas-flower

9 Winter Solstice Superstitions & What They Mean That Will Prepare You For Dec. 21 By ALLI HOFF KOSIK

 

Hugh Pinney/Getty Images News/Getty Images

I’m sure your top concern as we approach the upcoming winter solstice may be just how many more minutes of sun you’re going to get during your commute each day, but the truth is that the event is steeped in history and tradition that goes far beyond our modern taste for convenience and, well, light. With history, of course, comes superstition, so I did a little research and pulled together some details about some winter solstice superstitions, where they come from, what they mean, and how they play into the way we observe the month of December in modern times (if at all).

First, a brief lesson in what the winter solstice actually is: According to the trusty Farmer’s Almanac, it’s the day each year that has the fewest hours of sunlight, thanks to the fact that the sun reaches its southernmost point and begins moving north. The winter solstice is also the first day of the astronomical winter (the meteorological winter kicks off several weeks earlier). Since 2017’s winter solstice will take place on Dec. 21, the days will begin getting longer as of Dec. 22. Did I just make your (very short) day?

Now that we’ve got the basics down, check out these superstitions.

1. Dark Spirits Walk The Earth During The Winter Solstice

Shab-e Yalda — the Iranian festival that celebrates the birth of the ancient sun god who triumphed over darkness — is celebrated on the longest night of the year, aka the winter solstice. To observe the festival, a feast of watermelon, nuts, and pomegranate seeds is consumed… but that’s not all. Because of the light vs. dark symbolism, ancient lore holds that evil spirits wander the earth on this night stronger than ever, according to MentalFloss. There are shades of similar superstitions in Celtic and Germanic folklore too.

2. The 2012 Winter Solstice Should Have Been The End Of The World

Remember the 2012 end of days hysteria? Thankfully, it was nothing more than a superstition — but it was a superstition rooted in Mayan history. The winter solstice of that year (Dec. 21, 2012) corresponded to the date 13.0.0.0.0 on the Mesoamerican Long Count calendar and was the end of a 5126-year cycle. According to the superstition, these numbers were symbolic of the end of the world, or some other catastrophe.

3. The 2012 Winter Solstice Should Have Kicked Off A Worldwide Transformation

The flip side of the “Winter Solstice as the end of days” coin? The New Age belief that the significance of Dec. 21, 2012 was one of rebirth and transformation. Some believed that the Earth and all of its inhabitants would experience some sort of wonderful metamorphosis on that day.

4. The Winter Solstice Honors The Coming Of The Light

If you’ve been counting the minutes until you can leave the office when it’s still light outside, this one should make a lot of sense to you. Given the fact that

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.bustle.com/p/9-winter-solstice-superstitions-what-they-mean-that-will-prepare-you-for-dec-21-7593175

How to Make Dried Apple and Orange Slices | How to Make and Do

Here’s how to dry apple slices and orange slices for use in swags, wreaths and fragrant potpourri.

Dried fruit slices and peels are a great way to give your home a country prim look. They are fragrant and can be added to potpourri blends, fixings blends, wreaths or swags. They also make pretty and fragrant gift package decorations. When they are placed around candles, especially bakery candles, they give a nice country prim look.

The picture shown at right is an orange fixings blend. It combines dried orange slices and orange peels with fragrant spices like cinnamon sticks, allspice, and cloves. The look and smell is very seasonal and makes a great addition to country prim home decor.

The easiest way to dry fruit slices is to use a dehydrator

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https://howtomakedo.net/248/how-to-make-dried-apple-and-orange-slices/