5 Tips for DIY Couples Massage By Amy Sung

 

What to expect at a Pagan festival – Grove and Grotto by Michelle Gruben

What to expect at a Pagan festival

Thinking about attending a Pagan festival? Great! Festivals are a fabulous way to meet like-minded friends, nurture the mind and spirit, and be part of a vibrant, celebratory community.

But there’s a lot to consider before you pitch your tent and go bounding toward the revel fire. This article will help you sidestep some of the newbie mistakes that can dampen your enjoyment of a Pagan festival. We’ll touch on what to expect, how to pack, how not to be a jerk, and how not to miss out on the wonderful things the festival has to offer.

Disclosure: I’ve been attending Pagan festivals for around 10 years and vend at a few. I’m not affiliated with any of the organizations mentioned here (except as a member, when membership is required to attend the festival). This article reflects my individual research and opinions. Please check with each festival’s organizers for the most current festival dates and policies.

What to Expect

People who have never attended a Pagan festival before often ask, “What’s it like?” The answer, of course, is that it depends on the festival. Settings, amenities and program offerings vary widely. To Pagans, camping can mean anything from sleeping on

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https://www.groveandgrotto.com/blogs/articles/what-to-expect-at-a-pagan-festival

THE MAGIC OF AUTUMN. LITERALLY. RITUALS INCLUDED By Sarah Jenks

THE MAGIC OF AUTUMN. LITERALLY. RITUALS INCLUDED.

Autumn is the number one reason we moved to Massachusetts.  When temperatures dropped in July in San Francisco to the high 60s and the sunny afternoon was cut off by a blanket of cold fog every day, I felt so depressed.  But when the temperature climbed back up to 85 in September and left my beloved flannel shirts hanging in the closet, I felt like dying.  The kids would get sun burnt apple picking, there wasn’t a red leaf in sight and hot cider was the last thing I ever wanted to drink.

It’s also my birthday next week, so I have an even deeper connection to this incredible season.

You see, Mother Earth has an intelligence, and every physical shift and change is a message on how to be in the flow, to embrace our natural power and be more ALIVE.

Fall starts with the harvest, a time when farmers pull food from the ground, harvest the wheat and the corn and get busy prepping and storing it for the winter.  The animals are following suit gathering acorns and building winter proof homes.  It’s a time of great activity, business, and organization.  No wonder we’ve naturally chosen this time to go back to school.

We’ve been in the sign of Virgo for almost a month now which carries that same energy of business and organization.  My Annabelle is a Virgo and I see her organizing her toys, crayons, spoons, and clothing all the time, totally naturally in her free time.  She carries a part of this fall energy with her everywhere.  Virgo is also the sign of the Great Mother.  In early September, I felt myself wanting to shirk my motherhood responsibilities after a whole summer of being with the kids.  But Marshall was having the hardest time adjusting to his new school (probably because he could feel my exhaustion and pulling away).  So I had to sink into the natural rhythm of the season and recommit to how I wanted to mother him through this transition, while also honoring the natural energy of my own work, it was a lot to hold!  When I was in the middle of unraveling this dance between wanting to go into my red tent and create and being fully present for Marshall, a Mother Deer and her Baby walked through my backyard. Message received.

The 23rd is Mabon or the Fall Equinox, the day that measures equal hours of light and dark; night and the day are the same length – balance. It is also when we move into the sign of Libra, whose symbol is the scales – again, balance. Traditionally in the Northern Hemisphere, it is a time to have a great Harvest Festival, to really celebrate all of the hard work of the year and rest after a month of the hard work of harvesting.  

I define Magic as aligning with the natural power of what’s happening around us.  The Goddess/God/Divine (doesn’t matter what you call it) has created a world that moves in a certain pattern (Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter) which also corresponds with the moon phases (Waxing, Full Moon, Waning, New Moon), which also corresponds with our menstrual cycle (Follicular, Ovulation, Luteal, Bleeding).  This is the rhythm.  We can’t stop it, we can only ignore it.  But when we align our own energy and intentions with that of the seasons or moon cycle or menstrual (or all of them) we have double the power backing us up.  It’s like getting on the moving sidewalk in the airport, if you get on the one going the right direction, you get to where you’re going twice as fast.

This time in autumn is telling us to celebrate, to be grateful of what we have created in our life and to contemplate balance.  The magic of this is that when we are grateful for the abundance in our life, it multiplies and puts us in a high energetic vibration open to receiving more.  And in a few weeks, we are going to start seeing the leaves fall off the trees and have more darkness than light – a message to release, simplify and start to go in.

In my own life, I have found that just by paying attention to the messages of the season and doing very simple rituals to root into the lessons and align myself, crazy shit happens.

Here are two rituals you can do this week to connect with the Magic of Autumn:

Divine Dinner Party

Consider gathering a few friends on Mabon (Autumn Equinox) or a night near to it for dinner at your home.  Create a centerpiece with seasonal fruits and vegetables (lots of orange and red) and some orange and red candles (or any candle you have laying around, don’t over complicate it).  Ask your friends to bring a dish (we are celebrating balance after all).

Set sacred space around your table.  This can look like

READ MORE HERE: https://sarahjenks.com/blog/autumn-magic/

Not Into Halloween? Here are 13 Rituals to Celebrate Samhain | Gaia

By: Gaia Staff

Samhain is a time-honored tradition followed by witches, Wiccans, ancient druids and countless other modern pagans across the world, celebrated as October turns to November. Samhain is a festival of the Dead, meaning “Summer’s End,” and though you’re probably tempted to pronounce it “sam-hane,” it’s actually pronounced saah-win or saah-ween.

What is a Samhain Celebration?

Tradition holds that Samhain is a celebration of the end of the harvest and the start of the coldest half of the year, and with this transition it’s also celebrated as the beginning of the spiritual new year for practitioners, which is also why it’s nicknamed “The Witches’ New Year.”

How to Celebrate Samhain

Samhain is typically celebrated by preparing a dinner to celebrate the harvest. The holiday is meant to be shared with those who have passed on as well as those still with us. Set a place at the table for those in the spiritual plane, providing an offering for them upon every serving throughout the meal. In addition to those who have passed, invite friends and family to enjoy the feast with you. Typical beverages include mulled wine, cider, and mead, and are to be shared with the Dead throughout the meal.

Despite occurring at similar times and containing similar themes, Samhain and Halloween actually are not the same holiday. Halloween, short for All Hallow’s Eve, is celebrated on and around

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https://www.gaia.com/article/modern-paganism-13-rituals-celebrate-samhain

Mabon 2014: Six Ways To Celebrate The Pagan Autumnal Equinox By Antonia Blumberg

The autumnal equinox falls on September 23 in 2014, marking the official first day of fall as well as the pagan holiday, Mabon, in the northern hemisphere.

Mabon is a harvest festival, the second of three, that encourages pagans to “reap what they sow,” both literally and figuratively. It is the time when night and day stand equal in duration; thus is it a time to express gratitude, complete projects and honor a moment of balance.

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“Mabon is a time to reflect on the previous year, when we can celebrate our successes (likened to bringing in the harvest) and assess which crops, projects, or dreams didn’t come to fruition,” the Los Angeles-based pagan leader Laurie Lovekraft told HuffPost.

The pagan website The White Goddess explains:

This is the time to look back not just on the past year, but also your life, and to plan for the future. In the rhythm of the year, Mabon is a time of rest and celebration, after the hard work of gathering the crops. Warm autumn days are followed by chill nights, as the Old Sun God returns to the embrace of the Goddess.

The holiday is named after the Welsh God, Mabon, son of Earth Mother goddess Modron.

Some pagans mark the holiday by enjoying rich feasts with seasonal foods like apples, pomegranates and root vegetables. Many also observe rituals honoring the goddess’ transition from mother to crone.

Lovekraft offered six ways to celebrate that can be done in small or large groups or individually:

1. Create an altar. This can be on a dining room table, hearth, or dresser with apples, leaves, pinecones, corn, pomegranate, squash, and root vegetables. Add gardening tools (scythe, baskets, hand trowel) and objects that are the colors of gold, orange, red, bronze, and rust. Light an orange or yellow candle and give thanks for the blessings of abundance you have in your life. (Always remember fire safety when working with candles and never leave a candle burning unattended!)

2. Ask for blessings. When lighting your candle, you can call to the Goddess in her Mother aspect and/or ask the Green Man to bless your harvest.

3. Do apple magic. Apples are often harvested in the fall. Cut an apple horizontally to reveal the hidden, five-pointed star (a pentagram) inside. Look for pentagonal forms around you (ex. five fingers and five toes, five petals of certain flowers, starfish, etc.)

4. Listen to music. Music is a wonderful way to get into the mood of Mabon! Songs by Lisa Thiel, the Reclaiming Tradition, and S.J. Tucker are especially evocative.

5. Meditate on balance. This is especially helpful if you are a family caregiver, but also if you have a high-stress job, pressure-filled commute, or have a lot of personal drama. Reflect on how you handle pressure, how you manage your and other people’s emotions, and how easily your peace of mind can be disrupted. Think about ways you can reduce stress and bring more balance to your days. Consider

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/mabon-2014_n_5863384?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAMTD6RJGMejRnJGJqqyNXxfYZ2qWzjgAVxmyHg5-YRWXrMUL5t4r2kCM_h3M1VED6WeWh088W-ydTSrziuBOSTrqrP8I55lgS08u6yUGDbNfO5QTNXlhKmdWLAAptVzDyiqBw-KO0zRmPZd5VCW_GYiIU4BnWkeUWlrwSSt4DV6h

 

 

 

 

 

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