What the Heck Happened to My Body During Reiki? By Arianna Rebolini

Photo-Illustration: Photos: Getty Images

If you know what I’m talking about when I talk about reiki, you likely feel strongly about it. Maybe you describe it as the life-changing saving grace to your chronic back pain, or maybe you’re certain it’s quackery capitalizing on people at their weakest. At least for those moved to write about it on the internet, there’s little middle ground.

For everyone else, a brief explainer: Reiki is a spiritual healing practice which originated in Japan in the early 20th century, and is built on the belief that the body is innately able to heal itself. The word “reiki” loosely translates to “universal life energy” — an energy which practitioners believe exists within, and surrounds, each body — and the practice involves transmitting or balancing that energy, through the specific placement of hands on or above a recipient’s (fully clothed) body. Most commonly, reiki is used to ease pain, anxiety, fatigue, and depression, but since at its core is the conviction that the body in its natural state can heal any ailment, the applications, theoretically, are endless. However, the few, small studies on the practice have yet to yield much evidence of its efficacy (though the research has also found that it doesn’t appear to be harmful).

Six months ago, when I walked into my first reiki appointment at a Santa Fe oxygen spa, I had only ever heard the word in passing, and I didn’t really know what to expect. The spa’s description spoke vaguely about healing and relaxation; I thought I’d paid for a massage. What I got was one of the strangest experiences of my life: an hour in which my practitioner waved his hands over me and blew smoke across my body, to which my body responded with warm tingling in my arms and hands, mysterious pressure on my chest, and uncontrollable tremors in my legs. It was unexpected, a little scary, and definitely not relaxing.

According to my practitioner, these sensations indicated an energy blockage being released; they were merely signs that the session was working. He told me my body was returning to its natural state, i.e. “nearly orgasmic” energy. But it didn’t feel orgasmic. It felt crazy. I tend to be a cautious believer, but even I couldn’t accept this as the cause and effect. I needed to know: what had happened to my body?

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What complicates discussion of reiki is that, unlike alternative medicines which have become more integrated into Western medicine such as acupuncture and chiropractic, reiki is unregulated. The result of this is a proliferation of many and varied manifestations of the practice, influenced by different historical traditions and lineages, and often linked by little other than the practitioner’s calling it reiki. This dispersal of technique can be a source of frustration to those who’ve trained in the specific method as developed by the man generally accepted as the founder of modern reiki, Mikao Usui.

So far, the research cautions that reiki should be used in conjunction with, and never instead of, conventional treatments for conditions like pain, anxiety, or depression. But if reiki is to be used with conventional medicine, then there first needs to be clarity around what, precisely, reiki even is. Practitioners going rogue, blending multiple spiritual practices into something new and naming it reiki, muddies the already sparse data. One person who is working toward a singular definition of the practice for patients, practitioners, and medical professionals is Pamela Miles.

Miles, author of Reiki: A Comprehensive Guide, is the unofficial leader of the movement to legitimize reiki in the mainstream. Having practiced and researched reiki for over 31 years, Miles has published in multiple peer-reviewed medical journals, collaborated on NIH-funded medical research, taught reiki at medical schools, and spoken about reiki in the media. Though she doesn’t necessarily advocate for uniform regulation of the practice, she does emphasize the importance of continued research on its effectiveness, and for the education of those receiving it. When I described my experience to Miles over the phone, she wasn’t entirely convinced she’d call what happened “reiki” at all.

“I cannot speak to any particular experience, but the kinds of things you described sound more like an energy medicine, a shamanic approach, where the practitioner was moving the energy, clearing the obstacles.” I was confused. Isn’t that exactly what reiki is?

Ideally not, according to Miles. When practiced according to its origins,

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.thecut.com/2017/09/what-the-heck-happened-to-my-body-during-reiki.html

How To Use Cloves To Remove The Evil Eye

evil eyes

“Malocchio”, “Mal Oje”, “Ayin-hore”,  “Drishti”, “Mati”, “The Evil Eye”.

Different languages have different terms to express the same thing: the belief that the eyes can be used to curse another person or affect their life negatively. The belief in the evil eye exists in cultures all over the world and can be found as far back in human history as ancient Sumeria.

WHAT IS THE EVIL EYE?

The evil eye is a form of curse that is cast through a malevolent glare.

It is usually the result of envy, of jealously so strong that its energy consumes the person and is projected outwardly through the eyes, affecting the victim. The results vary, especially considering that the evil eye often affects one thing specifically (what the person who gives the evil eye is envious of) instead of having a general effect: from headaches and vomiting to stomach aches and more serious health symptoms, bad luck, fighting with your significant other, damage of property, injuries etc.

It is usually not done deliberately (although in some cultures/traditions, there are ways people use to train themself in how to use the evil eye to cause harm), but if given by a person who has the natural ability to easily give the evil eye and if this person is particularly envious, the effects can rival a deliberate curse placed upon someone.

Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click and make a purchase, I may earn a small commission (you pay the same either way, and I get to cover some of the costs of operating this website, so thank you 🙂 )

HOW TO REMOVE THE EVIL EYEremedies to remove buri nazar

There are many different ways to remove the evil eye curse.

The method I’m going to present here is the one I personally use. In many traditions they believe that for those methods to work, one has to either learn them from a person of the opposite sex (a mother can teach her son for example) or the person has to figure it out on their own by observing how someone else is doing it and without asking any questions.

Personally, I don’t believe there is any loss in effectiveness if one learns the method from a person of the same sex (or from an article on the internet, as is the case here).

However, the way I learnt this method was by observing older women in my extended family when they worked on removing the evil eye, so -since they weren’t allowed to explain how they do it exactly- chances are my method is slightly different than what my mom or aunt uses. This accounts for the many variations one can find for every basic method of evil eye removal, as well as for the different beliefs on how these methods can be used (many people will tell you for example that you cannot remove the mati from yourself; someone else has to do it) as well as in the actual result from the method used (the method I’m going to present for example is used by some people just for diagnostic purposes when they’re trying to find who gave them the evil eye, while

READ MORE HERE:  https://unseenseraph.com/remove-evil-eye-with-cloves/#more-159

 

 

 

 

 

 

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