CREAMY VEGAN LEMON BARS (GF)

Squares of our incredible gluten-free vegan lemon bars recipe

Lemon bars.

So elusive.
So tricky.
So very not vegan (or gluten-free)…until now.

Blender with ingredients for making our creamy homemade vegan lemon bars

Friends, vegan lemon bars (!!!) made with just 10 ingredientsnaturally sweetened, and gluten-free! I know, I’m excited, too.

The almond-oat crust is adapted from my Peanut Butter and Jelly Snack Bars, and somehow ends up tasting reminiscent of graham cracker crust! It’s my new favorite thing, besides this über creamy filling.

Pouring vegan lemon bar filling over gluten-free crust for our lemon bars recipe

The filling is comprised of soaked cashews, coconut cream, lots of lemon juice + zest, maple syrup, arrowroot starch (for thickening), and sea salt. That’s it!

I didn’t know what would happen if I blended it all up and baked it, but it turns out, it ends up tasting like a lemon bar with a cheesecake-like texture. SWOON!

Wood platter with squares of our gluten-free vegan lemon bars recipeBoard of homemade gluten-free vegan lemon bars sprinkled with powdered sugar

Friends, you’re going to LOVE these bars! They’re:

Creamy
Rich
Lemony
Not too sweet
Simple
Surprisingly healthy
Portable
& Delicious

These would make the perfect dessert for so many things: Bridal showers (I know), baby showers (I know!), study dates (yass girl), office gatherings (the least exciting, but still really cool). Even if you don’t have anywhere special to be, these would make a delicious treat to have around the house for snacking (but watch out – you’ll want 2 or 3).

If you try this recipe, let us know! Leave a comment it, rate it, and don’t forget to tag a picture #minimalistbaker on Instagram! I’d love to see what you come up with. Cheers, friends! Now excuse me while I dive into one of these magical bars.

Stack of healthy lemon bars for the perfect creamy gluten-free vegan dessert

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Batch of Creamy Vegan Lemon Bars topped with lemon slices and powdered sugar
4.71 from 118 votes

CREAMY VEGAN LEMON BARS

Creamy, naturally sweetened vegan lemon bars made with 10 simple ingredients and a delicious gluten-free crust.
Author: Minimalist Baker
PREP TIME5 hours
COOK TIME45 minutes
TOTAL TIME5 hours 45 minutes
Servings:  (bars)
Category: Dessert
Cuisine: Gluten-Free, Vegan
Freezer Friendly 1 month
Does it keep? 2-4 Days

 

 

 

 

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The Statistics of Vegetarians Vs. Meat-Eaters GORD KERR REVIEWED BY: JILL CORLEONE

If you’re trying to eat healthier, you may be considering omitting meat from your diet. Many restaurants and supermarkets now offer protein alternatives to make your decision easier. But is a vegetarian diet healthier? Learn about the pros and cons of a diet for vegetarian or vegan vs. a meat-eater to inform you as you consider changing your lifestyle.

(Image: sveta_zarzamora/iStock/GettyImages)

Although all vegetarians avoid eating meat, poultry and sometimes fish, there are many different variations of the vegetarian diet.

  • Vegans are total vegetarians who do not eat any animal products such meat, poultry and fish, including dairy products, eggs and honey.
  • Lacto vegetarians avoid all meat, poultry, fish and eggs, but they consume dairy products.
  • Lacto-ovo vegetarians don’t eat the flesh of any animal. No meat, poultry or fish, but eggs and dairy products are acceptable.
  • Ovo vegetarians eat eggs but refrain from eating meat, poultry, fish and dairy products.
  • Pesco vegetarians or pescatarians avoid meat but may eat fish.
  • Pollo-vegetarians don’t eat red meat but eat poultry.

How Many People Are Vegetarians?

Approximately 8 million adults in the U.S. do not eat meat, poultry or fish, according to the 2016 National Harris Poll published by the Vegetarian Resource Group. About one-half of vegetarians are also vegans — approximately 3.7 million U.S. adults.

Vegetarians, including vegans, make up the following percentages of the U.S. population:

  • 3.2 percent are adult males
  • 3.5 percent are adult females
  • 5.3 percent are ages 18 to 34
  • 3.1 percent are ages 35 to 44
  • 2.2 percent are ages 45 to 54
  • 1.8 percent are over age 65

Additionally, an increasing number of people have omitted or cut back on red meat consumption but still eat chicken and fish. Statistics show that 37 percent of Americans often or always eat vegetarian meals when dining out. This has major implications on the food and restaurant industry, which must offer meat alternatives and vegetarian dishes.

Reasons Why People Go Vegetarian

People choose to eat vegetarian for a variety of reasons. The Humane Research Council took a survey of the primary and contributory motivations for individuals to become vegetarians. Most people have multiple reasons for their transition, but the following are some of the more common:

  • Compassion for animals
  • To eat a generally healthier diet
  • To avoid additives and antibiotics in meat
  • A dislike for the taste of meat
  • To reduce impact on the environment
  • To reduce disease, like cancer and diabetes
  • For religious convictions
  • To eat less expensively
  • To lose weight
  • To reduce intake of cholesterol and fat

Are Vegetarians Healthier?

 

 

 

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Time for useful Information

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Let’s Face It: There Is No Such Thing as Humane Meat By: Ingrid Newkirk

Looking at online menus for a restaurant to take a visiting friend, I read “humane meat” and had to do a double-take. This bizarre concept, already seen on labels in upscale grocery stores, is invading eateries so that anyone who wishes to order the chicken can feel sort of OK or even really good about it. What are we thinking? That the animals were blown away in the middle of the night while dreaming sweet dreams after a life of comfy straw and the sun on their backs in lush green meadows, like in the fantasy cheese commercials that PETA sued to have removed from the airways, the ones that failed to show the real misery and muck in which California’s dairy cows languish until the truck comes to take them to you-know-where? Or maybe you don’t know where.

One hates to be absolute, but in my view, there is no such thing as humane meat. Perhaps if we were being asked to consider roadkill, which at least would not be cruelly raised or even killed by us (someone else’s non-commissioned vehicle doesn’t count) if we scraped it up off the tarmac and ate it, but that’s not what we are being asked to consider. Rather, it is being suggested that we actually find it acceptable to eat the flesh of animals who were very much alive, had friends and family — or, more likely, were deprived of them — and went through enormous trauma despite some small courtesies, such as perhaps 2 inches of additional space in their jam-packed prison cells. Yes, kicking the dog six times a week instead of seven is marginally better, but that doesn’t mean that we should go around suggesting that people kick the dog, just not as often, does it?

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Calling this sad flesh “humane” is like calling Britney Spears an opera singer. Yes, “Baby One More Time” may be easier on the ear than fingers on a blackboard, but it’s hardly Wagner’s “Ring Cycle,” is it? I could go along with SLCBSU, or “slightly less cruel but still unacceptable,” meat, but it’s definitely still not humane by a long shot.

There’s nothing humane about the flesh of animals who have had one or two or even three improvements made in their singularly rotten lives on today’s factory farms. Perhaps they are allowed outside into a patch of mud if they can fight their way out through the 10,000 other hens competing to get through the hatchway. Perhaps they are allowed to share a box in which to lay their eggs. Perhaps they are not kept in iron maidens or sow stalls in which they can never turn around. But the rest of their lot in life and the manner in which they are otherwise treated outside these reductions in abysmal treatment are still an abomination.

By being asked to support meat from living beings who are marginally less cruelly treated, we are being encouraged to support animal breeders, the people who bring our fellow animals into this world for the sole purpose of putting them through the wringer — causing them stress, trauma and pain — and then, because we’ll pay for those body parts, pronouncing, “Off with their heads!” In asking us to endorse humane meat, we are also being asked to endorse artificial insemination (a hideously terrifying procedure carried out on what farmers themselves call “rape racks”) and to support mutilations such as castration, dewattling, decombing, and ear-punching — all without painkillers. Being asked to support humane meat means being asked to support the suffering of animals in transport, to approve of treatment that causes them palpable fear, their bodies shaking and their eyes wide as saucers, as they are slung by their legs into crates that are slammed onto the back of a truck. And we are being asked to find acceptable and humane their experience of barreling down the highway in the freezing cold and sweltering heat. How can we accept any of that if we are against cruelty to animals? It’s simple — we can’t.

By being asked to endorse this grossly misnamed “humane meat,” we are being asked to endorse the ways in which the animals are killed, the final moments that culminate in the fear and the stench of the slaughterhouse. For most meat is obtained from the slaughterhouse, a place of blood and offal and struggles and screams. If that is so humane, why don’t we take the kids and make a day of it? Because it isn’t humane, that’s why.

All of us in society are supposed to believe that cruelty to animals is wrong and that it is a good thing to prevent needless suffering. So if that is true, how can meat be acceptable under any but the most extraordinary circumstances, such as perhaps roasting the bird who died flying into a window? The pig or hen’s misery

 

READ MORE:  https://www.huffpost.com/entry/humane-meat_b_2765996

 

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The Easiest Herbs to Grow Indoors — And How to Do It By Gabriella Vetere

When you are so used to cooking the same things, meals tend to feel monotonous. One of the best ways to change things up in the kitchen is to add fresh herbs. Not only do they have pungent flavor profiles, but they also usually come with added health benefits. Buying fresh herbs can get expensive, and they also tend to go bad if not used quickly, which is why so many of us use dried herbs. Instead, we are sharing our list of the easiest herbs to grow, their health benefits and how to get started.

First, let’s talk about the environment.

If you want to grow the best indoor garden, you need to ensure that the herbs will get sufficient sunlight. Most people tend to have a windowsill with adequate light in the kitchen, but if you do not, place your garden in any sunny room to grow. The ideal temperature would be 55-75 degrees Fahrenheit, and it would be good to give the room some ventilation daily.

What form should I plant them in?

Many common herbs grown indoors do better rooted from a cutting of an existing plant (except parsley, cilantro and dill). This technique is as easy as snipping a stem from a mature herb plant and putting the cutting in either a plant pot or water. Rooting in water works especially well for soft-stemmed herbs such as basil, mint, lemon balm, oregano and stevia. For woody herbs like rosemary, sage, oregano and thyme, take cuttings from new, green growth; older brown stems do not sprout roots easily.

Now, let’s discuss which herbs are best to grow and what nutritional benefits they provide.

Basil

Start basil from the seed and place the pots in a

 

READ MORE.  https://classpass.com/blog/2018/04/18/easiest-herbs-grow-indoors/

 

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The Super Superfood You’re Probably Not Eating Five good reasons to add sauerkraut to your diet by Shelley Emling

The Super Superfood You’re Probably Not Eating

Researchers also found that sauerkraut can reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

Is there anything better at a summer barbecue than a hot dog with sauerkraut tucked inside the bun? Not much. And beyond the taste, there also are plenty of healthy reasons to add this fermented cabbage to your diet — not only during the summer, but all year long. Here are just five of them.


 


1. Sauerkraut packs a punch when it comes to vitamins.

Popular throughout Central Europe for centuries, sauerkraut is a great source of vitamin C. And vitamin C — a superstar antioxidant — helps protect the body from stress and free radical damage. Other healthy nutrients in sauerkraut include vitamin K, known for its role in blood clotting, as well as calcium, potassium and phosphorus. An added bonus is that fermentation makes these nutrients easier for your body to absorb.

2. Sauerkraut boosts your digestive system.

Sauerkraut is ripe with probiotic power, or beneficial bacteria that wards off toxins and not-so-beneficial bacteria. In short, probiotics actually feed the good bacteria in your gut, which leads to better digestive health. Probiotics also have been shown to lessen gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation and symptoms associated with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

3. Sauerkraut could help you lose weight.

Like most vegetables, sauerkraut is a low-calorie food with a lot of fiber. As such, it can make you feel fuller for longer, which could help with weight loss. With only 15 calories in two-thirds of a cup, sauerkraut is the perfect snack when you get hungry between meals.

4. Sauerkraut may reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s.

Study after study shows a connection between the health of the gut and the health of the brain. Indeed, recent research out of Lund University in Sweden found that unhealthy intestinal flora could speed up the development of

 

READ MORE:  https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2017/superfood-sauerkraut-health-benefits-fd.html

 

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