“They told me gardening like This wouldn’t work, I didn’t listen” on YouTube

There’s nothing better than growing your own food.

We are in the process of building our raised garden beds and it eill totally be worth it!!

Let me know if you’ll be growing your own fruit and veg this year.

Bright Blessings to you and yours,

the Silver Sage of NewFound-Life.com 🙋🏾‍♀️✌🏽🕉

Garden Magic: Welcome to my magical garden BY RACHEL PATTERSON

Rachel Patterson is amazing!!  Have a peek…

rachel patterson magical garden

Whether you only have a window sill with a pot plant on, a small city terrace, a playing field or several acres, you can always work with the magic of your garden.  I think the kitchen extends into the garden anyway, so a Kitchen Witch will often be found pottering around in amongst the plants.

Being in regular contact with your garden and what you grow, even with your house plants or a few pots of herbs, can help you to connect with the spirit of nature and recognise the subtleties of the changing of the seasons and your garden can also provide you with food and magical ingredients.

Magical gardening does take time, focus and attention.  You can’t just plant something and leave it in the hope that several months later it will have grown, flourished and be covered in fruit or flowers (OK on the odd occasion it does happen but not often!).

My gardening memories date back to my childhood.  My dad is and always was a keen gardener, organic before it was fashionable to be so.  He has always had an allotment and a greenhouse which provide a bounty of wonderful fruit and vegetables.  Apparently even as a toddler I would disappear down the garden with him and come back covered in mud.

In my early teens I experienced food production on a large scale as I lived on a farm for a few years. Then in my late teens I had the opportunity of working for a specialist glasshouse company.  Both of those life events added to my love of the garden, food and nature’s bounty.

Once I owned by own house, the garden became key.  It is my sanctuary, a peaceful place to escape to and a space in which to create magic.

For the past twenty or so years we have lived in the same house; it is on the edge of a large city and only has a small walled garden, but it is ours and we have packed it full of as many plants, flowers and herbs as we can cram into it.  We even have a very small (i.e. teeny tiny) grow house just big enough to over winter a few pots and grow some seeds.

Even on my busy days I try to step out into the garden, if only just for a few minutes to relax and connect with Mother Earth.

Your garden, whatever size it is, opens up a whole new world of magic for you to delve in to.  Warning: Gardening is addictive and will improve your health, spirit and mental wellbeing.

Not only is a garden your direct line to a natural source of energy, it can also provide you with a whole shopping trolley full of free magical and often edible ingredients. Whether it is in the form of fruit and vegetables or flowers, petals and seeds.

Let’s open the magical box

You may imagine you need to have a beautiful picture box garden laid out in front of a thatched cottage to have a witch’s garden but really that isn’t the case.  You can style the garden in any way that suits your taste, size of garden and your budget.

Many hours and much money can be spent in garden centres and whilst they are brilliant sources for plant and design inspiration you can spend more money than you need to.  Oh…and a lot of them have a café…with cake.Plant nurseries often tend to be cheaper than garden centres but ask around.  Lots of family and friends will probably be willing to share cuttings and seeds with you.  And once your garden has a few plants in you can propagate more from those you already have.

Gardening does take time and effort.  You will need to dig, plant, weed, dead

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.patheos.com/blogs/beneaththemoon/2018/05/garden-magic/

vegan meatloaf by Iosune

This vegan meatloaf is a savory, healthy and gluten-free dish. Made with easy to find ingredients, it’s a delicious plant-based version of a classic recipe.

A picture of a sliced vegan meatloaf onto a white surface

Here’s another plant-based recipe, perfect for Thanksgiving, Christmas, special occasions or just to make on a daily basis. I’ve never been a meatloaf-lover myself, but I do love this vegan meatloaf.

The classic recipe is made with ground meat, bread, and some spices. I’ve used legumes instead of meat and nutritional yeast instead of bread to make a gluten-free recipe.

This meatloaf is adapted from our veggie burgers, which are the best plant-based burgers we’ve ever tried. You can find the recipe in our Simple Vegan Meals ebook. I don’t know which recipe I like the most (the burgers or the meatloaf) because both are AMAZING.

I preferred to use a lined 9×5 inch (23×13 cm) loaf pan to make this meatloaf, but any other rectangular pan will do. If you don’t have any, you can also use your hands and a lined baking sheet, it’s up to you!

This vegan meatloaf is simple, easy to make and so tasty! You can eat it with my vegan mashed potatoes and this delicious vegan gravy to enjoy a delicious plant-based meal

how to make vegan meatloaf – step by step
Step by step photos of how to make vegan meatloaf
  • Preheat the oven to 350ºF or 180ºC.
  • Add the chickpeas and beans to a mixing bowl and mash them (photo 1).
  • Add all the remaining ingredients of the meatloaf and mix until well combined (photo 2).
  • Press the mixture firmly in a lined 9×5 inch (23×13 cm) loaf pan (photo 3).
  • To make the glazemix all the ingredients in a mixing bowl (photo 4).
  • Spread the glaze evenly over top and bake for 50 minutes (photo 5).
  • Remove from the oven and allow the vegan meatloaf to cool for at least 5 minutes before removing it from the loaf pan (photo 6).

pro tips

  • Tahini can be replaced by any

READ MORE HERE:  https://simpleveganblog.com/simple-vegan-meatloaf/

My secret Magickal room…

Hey….I Have A Secret

Allow yourself to be carried far far away, into my Magickal, cozy, attic space where my power flourishes when I make my potions and notions for those of you who have requested my Magickal services.

This space is also where I do your Tarot card readings and your Angel Messages, plus all of the other Rituals that you request of me. If you wish to place an order, or just leave me a message to say hello, feel free to write me in the comments section down below or, you can email me at the following email address:

igo4more@web.de

I’m glad that you came to see me! You are welcome to stop by any time, and rest a spell, for here is where you can relax and rejuvenate your spirit without judgment and or fear.

Sincerely yours,

the Silver Sage of NewFound-Life.com

P.s. It would be lovely if you would subscribe to my YouTube channel & also follow my blog: https://newfound-life.com/blog-post/

Get Started Growing Herbs in Pots Written by Kerry Michaels

Herbs grown in containers sitting on a deck.
 Simon Wheeler Ltd/Photolibrary/Getty Images
  • 01of 05

    Benefits of Growing Herbs in Pots

    Herbs grown in three blue pots surrounded by other flowers and pots.
     © Kerry Michaels

    Herb container gardens are popular for many reasons. Even if you have miles of property and gardens galore, it’s so convenient to be able to step out your door and pick a handful of fresh herbs from a beautiful container garden, any time of the day or night. Maintenance is also more convenient with containers, and there are fewer problems with weeds and critters getting into your crop.

    You can grow almost any herb in a container, and most are very easy. However, herbs can have different water requirements, and some are more finicky than others, so be sure to put herbs with similar needs in the same pot.

  • 02of 05

    Planning Your Herb Container

    Potted container with three different types of herbs.
     © Kerry Michaels

    You can grow as many types of herbs in one container as you want, as long as you make sure that all the herbs in a single pot share the same sun, water, and soil preferences. For example, rosemary likes it hot and dry, while parsley needs steady moisture. Therefore, they don’t work well together in the same pot.

    Don’t forget that herbs can also serve as decorative elements in any container garden, adding texture and scent when mixed with annuals or perennials. Again, just be sure to pair them with plants that have the same requirements for light and water.

  • 03of 05

    Choosing a Container for Your Herbs

    Metal container filled with a variety of herbs.
     © Kerry Michaels

    You can use almost anything for an herb container as long as it provides for good drainage. Most herbs don’t have large root systems, so you can get away with smaller containers. This is especially true of the herbs that don’t mind drying out between waterings. However, the smaller the container, the less soil there is, which means you have a smaller margin of error when it comes to watering.

    Some herbs thrive in self-watering containers because they like a constant level of moisture. Plants such as chives, parsley, marjoram, and mint would be particularly good candidates for growing in self-watering pots. Other herbs, such as oreganothyme, rosemary, and basil, prefer to dry out between watering so wouldn’t be good candidates for self-watering containers.

  • 04of 05

    Planting and Caring for Your Herbs

    Garden pot filled with herbs and flowers.
     © Kerry Michaels

    Help your herbs thrive with the right soil, sun, and feeding. Use high-quality potting soil because most herbs need good drainage. Also, make sure that your container has drainage holes so you don’t drown your herbs.

    Most herbs need full sun for at least six hours a day. That said, containers can really bake on a hot day, so if you live somewhere where temperatures soar, your herb containers may need to be shaded during the hottest part of the day.

    Be careful not to over-fertilize your herbs. Most don’t like it and some herbs will simply die if they are fussed with and overfed. Some herbs such as thyme and oregano thrive on neglect and won’t be as tasty if they are given too much attention, water, or food.

    Continue to 5 of 5 below.
  • 05of 05

    Harvesting Your Herbs

    Herb bouquet in a blue vase.
     © Kerry Michaels

    The rule of thumb for harvesting herbs is that the more you pick, the more you’ll get. Also, you want to pinch back most herbs to make them bushier and well-formed. But

    READ MORE HERE: https://www.thespruce.com/growing-herbs-in-pots-getting-started-3876523