Upping the quarantine Routine, by the Silver Sage

Greetings, my ASF! 😉 (ARISING SOUL FAMILY)

How are you doing? It’s important that you’re not allowing ‘the quarantine’ to pull you down.

It’s my hope that you’re using this time wisely and lifting yourself (and others), up.

Here are a some tips from me as to a few of the things I do to help lift my soul during this time.

1. Meditation

2. Spiritual cleansing baths

3. Communing with Mother Nature by way of taking care of my plant-babys, going for walks, and being outdoors with my face to the sky.

4. Journaling

5. Getting extra sleep

6. Cooking DELICIOUS, lowfat, low calorie Vegetarian & Vegan meals

I’ll share more of my list in another article, but for now, I’ll share with you a few photos of the meal and (lowfat,low calorie), dessert that we made today.

We feed our fur-baby the same things we eat, except for desserts, of course! 😁👍🏽

Stay safe and healthy and look after one another.

Peace🕉☮,

the Silver Sage of NewFound-Life.com

vegan meatloaf by Iosune

This vegan meatloaf is a savory, healthy and gluten-free dish. Made with easy to find ingredients, it’s a delicious plant-based version of a classic recipe.

A picture of a sliced vegan meatloaf onto a white surface

Here’s another plant-based recipe, perfect for Thanksgiving, Christmas, special occasions or just to make on a daily basis. I’ve never been a meatloaf-lover myself, but I do love this vegan meatloaf.

The classic recipe is made with ground meat, bread, and some spices. I’ve used legumes instead of meat and nutritional yeast instead of bread to make a gluten-free recipe.

This meatloaf is adapted from our veggie burgers, which are the best plant-based burgers we’ve ever tried. You can find the recipe in our Simple Vegan Meals ebook. I don’t know which recipe I like the most (the burgers or the meatloaf) because both are AMAZING.

I preferred to use a lined 9×5 inch (23×13 cm) loaf pan to make this meatloaf, but any other rectangular pan will do. If you don’t have any, you can also use your hands and a lined baking sheet, it’s up to you!

This vegan meatloaf is simple, easy to make and so tasty! You can eat it with my vegan mashed potatoes and this delicious vegan gravy to enjoy a delicious plant-based meal

how to make vegan meatloaf – step by step
Step by step photos of how to make vegan meatloaf
  • Preheat the oven to 350ºF or 180ºC.
  • Add the chickpeas and beans to a mixing bowl and mash them (photo 1).
  • Add all the remaining ingredients of the meatloaf and mix until well combined (photo 2).
  • Press the mixture firmly in a lined 9×5 inch (23×13 cm) loaf pan (photo 3).
  • To make the glazemix all the ingredients in a mixing bowl (photo 4).
  • Spread the glaze evenly over top and bake for 50 minutes (photo 5).
  • Remove from the oven and allow the vegan meatloaf to cool for at least 5 minutes before removing it from the loaf pan (photo 6).

pro tips

  • Tahini can be replaced by any

READ MORE HERE:  https://simpleveganblog.com/simple-vegan-meatloaf/

The Most Laid-Back Guide to Going Vegetarian You’ll Ever Read by Matt Frazier

It went well and I had a great time, but in hindsight, I realize the topic I chose was a tough one.

I spoke about the “no-pressure approach” to vegetarianism that I take with No Meat Athlete. Instead of trying to persuade people that they should go vegetarian (and now, dammit!), I’d much rather just set an example that people can choose to follow or learn from if they’d like. I’ve just never been one for confrontation, and I hope my writing here reflects that.

But after I was done speaking, I thought to myself: Boy, that would have been so much easier if I had just talked about the same stuff I write on the site. 

And so I got to thinking — what’s the gist of my message?

That’s when I got the idea for a series of posts that I should have written long ago. This is the first post in that series, the heart of the message I want to spread about vegetarianism (future installments will be about running and healthy eating, I think).

And as it turns out, it’s pretty much a demo of what I talked about in NYC. So that works out. 🙂

“Should” you go vegetarian?

I’d be lying if I said I didn’t want you to go vegetarian or vegan. Compassion for animals was big part of my reason for doing so, and so I’d love it if nobody ate them.

But I’m not going to tell you what’s best for you. That’s for you to decide.

Is a plant-based diet healthier than an omnivorous one?

Tough one.

I believe I’m a lot healthier now that I’m vegan. It forces me to avoid fast food and countless other convenient, but unhealthy, foods that I used to eat. So in my mind, there’s no question that a well-planned plant-based diet is healthier than the standard (terrible) American diet.

But how about compared to a whole-foods diet that happens to include a small amount (say, 10% of calories) of meat, maybe a little dairy? Honestly, I’m not convinced that one is clearly healthier than the other.

There’s a lot of science that says a plant-based diet is better. And there are plenty of people who claim that this science is bunk.

To me, it’s not clear that one diet is necessarily healthier than the other. I’m fine to call it a tie. I just know that passing up a McDonald’s is way easier for me now than it was before I was vegetarian, and as a result, I make so much more of my own food than I used to, and eat so many more fruits and vegetables than before. For that aspect, I like it.

Is a plant-based diet better for sports?

I got faster when I went vegetarian, so much so that I took over 10 minutes off my previous marathon and qualified for Boston on my first attempt after I changed my diet.

But I also changed the way I trained, so I can’t say for sure how big a role each change played. I can say that I lost 5-10 pounds when I went vegetarian, and I believe that was a huge factor in getting faster.

Brendan Brazier and Scott Jurek have both told me they believe they recover from workouts better on a plant-based diet than on

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.nomeatathlete.com/relax-2/

Eating well is a part of loving yourself. By the Silver Sage

H

Hi lovelies,

thanks for coming back to check out my blog. 👍🏾

This is just a quick reminder that a lot of people say that they love themselves, but do they ever really stop and think what they are filling their bodies with?

Time to start getting healthy, or healthier. Now is the time; new year…new decade.

This salad that I prepared for myself this evening was bomb!

Rocket, tomatoes, cucumber, sunflower seeds, and a little pasta, olives, goat cheese and loads of herbs…no need for salad dressing.

Try it out and let me know how you liked it.

Blessings to you and yours,

Silver 😘

WHAT ARE THE BEST VEGETARIAN MEAT SUBSTITUTES AND ARE THEY GOOD FOR YOU? By Rachel Hosie

Make sure you get enough protein and the essential nutrients for a healthy lifestyle by choosing your meat-alternatives wisely

With veganism on the rise – a survey released last year found that around 3.5 million Britons have adopted a plant-based diet – many people are turning to meat substitutes to bulk out their meals and ensure they’re consuming enough protein.

While meat-free protein sources including beans, lentils, chickpeas, soya, nuts, seeds, wheat, rice, maize, milk, yoghurt and cheese all provide protein, many vegetarians like to consume mycoprotein, a single-cell protein derived from funghi.

Quorn is a mycoprotein and one of the best-known brands of meat alternatives. And in July 2018, the vegetarian company, best known for its meat-free mince and “chicken style” pieces, announced it will be investing £7m into a new product development centre with the hope of capitalising on the UK’s growing appetite for meat substitutes.

But whilst there’s no denying the benefit to the environment of cutting down your meat intake, do substitutes actually provide all the nutrients we need?

“Plant-based sources of protein are generally incomplete – they don’t contain all of the essential amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein – meaning it’s essential to eat a variety of them every day,” registered dietitian Nichola Ludlam-Raine explained to The Independent.

“Soya, quinoa and hemp are the only plant-based complete sources of protein i.e. they contain all of the essential amino acids that our body needs.”

Ludlam-Raine says it’s important to bear in mind, however, that meat-alternatives often contain a lot less protein than their

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/vegetarian-meat-substitutes-alternatives-best-tofu-quorn-jackfruit-a9047106.html

Veggie Dumpling Stew By The Purple Carrot

By The Purple Carrot

Veggie Dumpling Stew

DINNER
Family FriendlySpring RecipesSoy-FreeBeans/LegumesRoot VegetablesAppetizerSide DishSoupDinner
GET RECIPES DELIVERED

SERVINGS

2

PREP & COOK TIME
40 min
CALORIES
266
FAT
2g
CARBOHYDRATES
54g
PROTEIN
9g

MAIN INGREDIENTS

  1. 2 potatoes
  2. 3/4 cup peas
  3. 1 carrot
  4. 1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
  5. 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  6. 3/4 cup almond milk
  7. 1 tablespoon agave
  8. 1 onion
  9. 2 garlic cloves, peeled
  10. 4 cups vegetable broth, used in two steps
  11. 1/4 cup fresh parsley
  12. 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast*
  13. 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano*
  14. 1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary*
  15. 1/2 teaspoon dried basil*
  16. pinch salt**
  17. 2 tablespoons olive oil**
  18. * spice pack
  19. ** not included

TOOLS

  • Large Saucepan
  • Medium Bowl

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Prepare. Rinse and dry all produce. Peel and chop the onion; mince the garlic, peel and dice the carrot; dice the potato. Roughly chop the parsley, removing the stems. Place olive oil in a large saucepan over medium high heat.
2. Add two tablespoons of vegetable broth, the onion and