“They told me gardening like This wouldn’t work, I didn’t listen” on YouTube

There’s nothing better than growing your own food.

We are in the process of building our raised garden beds and it eill totally be worth it!!

Let me know if you’ll be growing your own fruit and veg this year.

Bright Blessings to you and yours,

the Silver Sage of NewFound-Life.com 🙋🏾‍♀️✌🏽🕉

Why Go Veg? By Vegetarian Times Editors

Learn the reasons to change over to a vegetarian diet, and start eating less meat today—or none at all!
Why Go Vegetarian

Alexandra Anschiz / Shutterstock

Why are people drawn to vegetarianism? Some just want to live longer, healthier lives. Others have made the switch to preserve Earth’’s natural resources or from a love of animals and an ethical opposition to eating them.

Thanks to an abundance of scientific research that demonstrates the health and environmental benefits of a plant-based diet, even the federal government recommends that we consume most of our calories from grain products, vegetables and fruits.

And no wonder: An estimated 70 percent of all diseases, including one-third of all cancers, are related to diet. A vegetarian diet reduces the risk for chronic degenerative diseases such as obesity, coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and certain types of cancer including colon, breast, prostate, stomach, lung and esophageal cancer.

Why go vegetarian? Chew on these reasons:

You’ll ward off disease.

Vegetarian diets are more healthful than the average American diet, particularly in preventing, treating or reversing heart disease and reducing the risk of cancer. A low-fat vegetarian diet is the single most effective way to stop the progression of coronary artery disease or prevent it entirely. Cardiovascular disease kills 1 million Americans annually and is the leading cause of death in the United States.

But the mortality rate for cardiovascular disease is lower in vegetarians than in nonvegetarians, says Joel Fuhrman, MD, author of Eat to Live: The Revolutionary Formula for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss. A vegetarian diet is inherently healthful because vegetarians consume less animal fat and cholesterol (vegans consume no animal fat or cholesterol) and instead consume more fiber and more antioxidant-rich produce——another great reason to listen to Mom and eat your veggies!

You’ll keep your weight down.

The standard American diet—high in saturated fats and processed foods and low in plant-based foods and complex carbohydrates——is making us fat and killing us slowly. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and a division of the CDC, the National Center for Health Statistics, 64 percent of adults and 15 percent of children aged 6 to 19 are overweight and are at risk of weight-related ailments including heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

A study conducted from 1986 to 1992 by Dean Ornish, MD, president and director of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, California, found that overweight people who followed a low-fat, vegetarian diet lost an average of 24 pounds in the first year and kept off that weight 5 years later. They lost the weight without counting calories or carbs and without measuring portions or feeling hungry.

You’ll live longer.

If you switch from the standard American diet to a vegetarian diet, you can add about 13 healthy years to your life, says Michael F. Roizen, MD, author of The RealAge Diet: Make Yourself Younger with What You Eat. “People who consume saturated, four-legged fat have a shorter life span and more disability at the end of their lives. Animal products clog your arteries, zap your energy and slow down your immune system. Meat eaters also experience accelerated cognitive and sexual dysfunction at a younger age.”

Want more proof of longevity?

Residents of Okinawa, Japan, have the longest life expectancy of any Japanese and likely the longest life expectancy of anyone in the world, according to a 30-year study of more than 600 Okinawan centenarians. Their secret: a low-calorie diet of unrefined complex carbohydrates, fiber-rich fruits and vegetables, and soy.

You’ll build strong bones.

When there isn’t enough calcium in the bloodstream, our bodies will leach it from existing bone. The metabolic result is that our skeletons will become porous and lose strength over time. Most health care practitioners recommend that we increase our intake of calcium the way nature intended——through foods. Foods also supply other nutrients such as phosphorus, magnesium and vitamin D that are necessary for the body to absorb and use calcium.

People who are mildly lactose-intolerant can often enjoy small amounts of dairy products such as yogurt, cheese and lactose-free milk. But if you avoid dairy altogether, you can still get a healthful dose of calcium from dry beans, tofu, soymilk and dark green vegetables such as broccoli, kale, collards and turnip greens.

You’ll reduce your risk of food-borne illnesses.

The CDC reports that food-borne illnesses of all kinds account for 76 million illnesses a year, resulting in 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths in the United States. According to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), foods rich in protein such as meat, poultry, fish and seafood are frequently involved in food-borne illness outbreaks.

You’ll ease the symptoms of menopause.

Many foods contain nutrients beneficial to perimenopausal and menopausal women. Certain foods are rich in phytoestrogens, the plant-based chemical compounds that mimic the behavior of estrogen. Since phytoestrogens can increase and decrease estrogen and progesterone levels, maintaining a balance of them in your diet helps ensure a more comfortable passage through menopause. Soy is by far the most abundant natural source of phytoestrogens, but these

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.vegetariantimes.com/health-and-nutrition/why-go-veg-learn-about-becoming-a-vegetarian

Vegetable seeds to sow in March By BBC Gardeners’ World Magazine

There are lots of vegetable crops that can be sown in March, when the days are beginning to lengthen and become warmer.

Some crops, such as chillies and tomatoes, need to be sown early in the year in order to give them the long growing season that they need. Others, such as fast-growing beetroot and salads can be started off early so that you can enjoy them in late spring and early summer – keep sowing them to extend the harvest.

Tender crops like aubergines need to be sown under glass, either in a greenhouse or on a sunny windowsill. Hardier crops like beetroot and broad beans can be sown directly into the ground outdoors; do not sow if the ground is frosty or covered in snow.

Find out which crops you can sow in March, below.


Aubergines, chillies and tomatoes

In the unpredictable British climate, tomatoes, chillies and aubergines need a long growing season in order to produce a good crop – so start them off early. Sow under glass for the best results.

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Broad beans

Broad beans are a welcome crop in early summer, and can be sown outdoors in March. Watch out for blackfly as the plants grow – pinch out the growing tip, where they congregate.

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Watch “The Wild Route: Leaving Work and Home for a Forest Life | NBC Left Field” on YouTube

I think I would like this life. What about you?😍

6 Tips For Healthy Zen Living – Dr. Gayathri Raman

healthy zen living

You know the saying “prevention is better than cure”? Well, in this month’s blog, we will be discussing prevention from a whole new perspective: it’s called healthy zen living. It will take us to a level that is so deep, that healing can only be understood by experiencing the change.

As I took advantage of these beautiful spring days, I planted myself under the majesty of the beautiful “Great Oak”. When I gazed upwards, I noticed the ease with which the branches flowed to protect me against the fury of the sun’s rays. The leaves were so content in their simplicity that they happily danced to the occasional breeze that would sweep in. I wondered just how content and healthy they must be feeling. With a little love, light and hydration, they live a life free from disease and suffering. It was then I began to question, since we are all made up of the same divine cells, shouldn’t we be able to live a healthy disease free life also?

Yes!! While we can’t prevent 100% of ailments, we can do everything in our understanding to TRY and prevent 100% of the diseases that quite possibly could come our way. I took a step back and began to reflect on my own journey. A journey that has taken me from illness to healing. From confusion to clarity. From

READ MORE HERE:

https://drramanstl.com/2018/05/16/healthy-zen-living/