Helping an Injured or Sick Hedgehog

Hedgehogs need our help

When you find an injured hedgehog, watch it first to see how badly hurt it is. Then seek immediate emergency treatment from a wildlife rehabilitator or local vet.

If you ever find a sick, injured or a hedgehog you are concerned about it needs to be protected and kept safe because *every minute matters.

If possible, try to wear suitable gloves to pick up the animal, then put them in a secure cardboard box with ventilation holes, lines with newspaper or a towel, if you can try to wrap them in a soft blanket (ideally use suitable gloves). Then ring for help by contacting a hedgehog or wildlife rescue centre or carer immediately. If you cannot get through take them to a local vet as soon as possible so they can give them emergency treatment.

Hedgehogs will often try crawling away, so keeping them protected in a well-ventilated box, even wrapped in a blanket will help. Try to take them indoors while you call for emergency help.

A good way to help them keep warm is to fill a hot water bottle up and cover it up completely with a towel, so it’s not hot and its gentle warmth for the box. Never allow the bottle to go cold, remove before it gets cold.

Put the box somewhere

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.treatmekind.org.uk/help-hedgehogs/

Advertisements

BBC – Earth – Why do leaves change colour in autumn? By Chris Packham

The glory of autumn explained: Chris Packham reveals why leaves change from greens to reds and golden yellows.

The spectacle of green leaves turning rich reds and yellows in autumn happens when trees have taken all the food they can from the leaves that are filled with chlorophyll – the biomolecule that absorbs energy from sunlight and gives leaves their green colour.

When sunlight wanes and leaves stop making food, this green pigment is broken down into colourless compounds. Yellow pigments are then revealed and other chemical changes cause red colouration.

Enjoy the splendour of this wonderful transition of the seasons in this video.

TASMANIA’S FLESH EATING PLANTS BY LULU MORRIS

You may have heard of insect-catching plants like the Venus fly trap but have you ever come across the infamous flesh-eating plants of Tasmania?

The southern island boasts an impressive array of carnivorous plants that will eat insects and any small prey that they can get their carnivorous florets on – but not anything as big as a human so you can tread safely in the Tasmanian bush.

Darren Cullen from Tasmania collects the flesh eating plants. His impressive assortment include the popular and common as well as the rare and endemic.

WE GET PEOPLE TRAVELLING HERE TO SEE TASMANIAN CARNIVOROUS PLANTS. WE HAVE TWO GENERA OF CARNIVOROUS PLANTS HERE, DROSERA AND UTRICULARIA, OTHERWISE KNOWN AS SUNDEWS AND BLADDERWORTS. YOU GROW BLADDERWORTS FOR THEIR AMAZING FLOWERS AS THE TRAPS ARE UNDERGROUND.

The flesh-eating plants are technically endangered in Tasmania but are commonly found around Victoria and in parts of New Zealand.

WHAT FLESH DO THESE PLANTS EAT?

Sundews, one of the state’s most sought after carnivores, are known for their glandular tentacles that are covered in a sticky liquid secretion. Their prey, which mostly consists of insects are attracted to the sweet smell of the sticky liquid that the plant secretes. Once this liquid is touched by their prey, they become trapped in the sticky mucus and die from asphyxiation as it envelops them.

The tentacles can move in

READ MORE HERE: https://www.nationalgeographic.com.au/australia/tasmanias-flesh-eating-plants.aspx

 

Apples in Witchcraft . Witches Apple Lore & Spells – WhiteMagickAlchemyBlog by Nancy Upshaw

Apples in Witchcraft . Witches Apple Lore & Spells

Few of our Mother’s gifts are so celebrated in lore as the apple. Often associated with goddesses of fertility, the apple is for many, a Tree of Knowledge. Apples, may be incorporated into spells and magical rituals when honoring deities (gods and goddesses) and can be used for abundance, prosperity, money spells, luck, love, peace, balance and happiness.

For fertility, the seeds can be planted in establishing a shrine of trees to Aphrodite or other fertility goddesses. Dried apple seeds can be ground into a powder with a mortar and pestle and used as incense. Apples may be eaten, the juice shared in a chalice ritual cup, or offered as a libation when seeking knowledge through the Tree of Life… an act of calling upon the wisdom from the divine.

The Granny Smith apple is known as the witches apple as for when it is cut horizontally, the seed cavity reveals a pentacle (five pointed star). The Granny Smith apple is often used in abundance and money spells because of it’s green color of prosperity. For a good money spell you may wish to read about my Powerful Immediate Money Drawing Spell. Told to me by a shaman friend many many moons ago, it has proven over the years to be the best money spell I’ve ever come across and we

READ MORE HERE:

http://whitemagickalchemyblog.com/apples-in-witchcraft-witches-apple-lore-spells/

The day we went MAD foraging for mushrooms in Latvia – BY BUDGETTRAVELLER

barabika-mushroom

‘What are you doing today?’

Nothing.

Let’s go mushroom picking.’

Our guide for the day, Latvian blogger Zane Enina ofMugursoma.lv fame tells me that this is a pretty common conversation amongst Latvians during Autumn.

I wonder immediately if they are enough mushrooms for every Latvian to go mushroom picking.

‘50% of Latvia is covered by forests. There are always enough mushrooms for everyone. Plus a whole lot of space to get lost in and escape reality.’

We’re rolling through an open road about 100 kms outside of Riga. We’re surrounded by dense forests and an immense blanket of silence. We’ve been driving for almost 20 minutes from Zane’s house in Vangazi and there’s been nothing but green forests and deep blue skies.

roaming-wild-free-latvia

I’m pretty excited about the idea of foraging for food. It has been one of those skills I’ve been always curious to learn more about. My father grew up in a rural part of India where nature’s bounty was rich. The garden of the house he grew up in was more like a jungle. You could find everything here from the freshest (hottest) green chillies

READ MORE HERE:

https://budgettraveller.org/foraging-for-wild-mushrooms-in-latvia/

The plant that can kill and cure

Belladonna, or deadly nightshade

Nightshades have a deadly reputation but these plants, steeped in myth and folklore, have been used for thousands of years for medicinal purposes. And they may have properties that could keep us healthy today, writes Mary Colwell.

“J K Rowling was extremely good at botany, and one of the plants she put into Harry Potter was mandrake,” says Sandy Knapp, head of the Plants Division at the Natural History Museum in London.

In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Prof Sprout shows Harry and his classmates how to repot young mandrakes, but not without everyone wearing earmuffs.

“The cry of the mandrake is fatal to anyone who hears it,” says Hermione, showing off her knowledge to the class. But the students are dealing with young plants which are not quite so dangerous. Prof Sprout points out that as they are “only seedlings, their cries won’t kill yet… but they will knock you out for several hours”.

The pupils cover their ears and Harry pulls a mandrake out of its pot. “Instead of roots, a small, muddy and extremely ugly baby popped out… He had pale green mottled skin, and was clearly bawling at the top of his lungs.”

The scene is based on a medieval myth – it was believed that when pulled from the ground the root emitted a shrill cry that drove people mad and killed them.

Mandrake - illustration from a copy of 'De Materia Medica' by the Greek physician Dioscorides made in 1460Image copyrightSCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY
Image captionAn illustration from De Materia Medica by the Greek physician Dioscorides, made in 1460

Find out more


The plant also features in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet: “What with loathsome smells, And shrieks like mandrakes torn out of the earth, That living mortals, hearing them, run mad.”

Herbalists who wanted to use mandrake were advised to plug their ears, tie the plant to a dog and place some meat out of reach – then when the dog ran to the meat it would pull the screaming root out of the soil. The dog would die, but the herbalist would get the mandrake safely.

READ MORE HERE: https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-33506081

 

 

Mabon 2014: Six Ways To Celebrate The Pagan Autumnal Equinox By Antonia Blumberg

The autumnal equinox falls on September 23 in 2014, marking the official first day of fall as well as the pagan holiday, Mabon, in the northern hemisphere.

Mabon is a harvest festival, the second of three, that encourages pagans to “reap what they sow,” both literally and figuratively. It is the time when night and day stand equal in duration; thus is it a time to express gratitude, complete projects and honor a moment of balance.

REAL LIFE. REAL NEWS. REAL VOICES.
Help us tell more of the stories that matter from voices that too often remain unheard.

“Mabon is a time to reflect on the previous year, when we can celebrate our successes (likened to bringing in the harvest) and assess which crops, projects, or dreams didn’t come to fruition,” the Los Angeles-based pagan leader Laurie Lovekraft told HuffPost.

The pagan website The White Goddess explains:

This is the time to look back not just on the past year, but also your life, and to plan for the future. In the rhythm of the year, Mabon is a time of rest and celebration, after the hard work of gathering the crops. Warm autumn days are followed by chill nights, as the Old Sun God returns to the embrace of the Goddess.

The holiday is named after the Welsh God, Mabon, son of Earth Mother goddess Modron.

Some pagans mark the holiday by enjoying rich feasts with seasonal foods like apples, pomegranates and root vegetables. Many also observe rituals honoring the goddess’ transition from mother to crone.

Lovekraft offered six ways to celebrate that can be done in small or large groups or individually:

1. Create an altar. This can be on a dining room table, hearth, or dresser with apples, leaves, pinecones, corn, pomegranate, squash, and root vegetables. Add gardening tools (scythe, baskets, hand trowel) and objects that are the colors of gold, orange, red, bronze, and rust. Light an orange or yellow candle and give thanks for the blessings of abundance you have in your life. (Always remember fire safety when working with candles and never leave a candle burning unattended!)

2. Ask for blessings. When lighting your candle, you can call to the Goddess in her Mother aspect and/or ask the Green Man to bless your harvest.

3. Do apple magic. Apples are often harvested in the fall. Cut an apple horizontally to reveal the hidden, five-pointed star (a pentagram) inside. Look for pentagonal forms around you (ex. five fingers and five toes, five petals of certain flowers, starfish, etc.)

4. Listen to music. Music is a wonderful way to get into the mood of Mabon! Songs by Lisa Thiel, the Reclaiming Tradition, and S.J. Tucker are especially evocative.

5. Meditate on balance. This is especially helpful if you are a family caregiver, but also if you have a high-stress job, pressure-filled commute, or have a lot of personal drama. Reflect on how you handle pressure, how you manage your and other people’s emotions, and how easily your peace of mind can be disrupted. Think about ways you can reduce stress and bring more balance to your days. Consider

READ MORE HERE:

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/mabon-2014_n_5863384?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAMTD6RJGMejRnJGJqqyNXxfYZ2qWzjgAVxmyHg5-YRWXrMUL5t4r2kCM_h3M1VED6WeWh088W-ydTSrziuBOSTrqrP8I55lgS08u6yUGDbNfO5QTNXlhKmdWLAAptVzDyiqBw-KO0zRmPZd5VCW_GYiIU4BnWkeUWlrwSSt4DV6h

 

 

 

 

 

Continue reading “Mabon 2014: Six Ways To Celebrate The Pagan Autumnal Equinox By Antonia Blumberg”