5 Signs You May Be Ready to Practice Reiki by Christie Pitko

5 Signs You May Be Ready to Practice Reiki

Reiki is used to promote the healing of chronic pain, insomnia, anxiety, depression, addiction, the immune system, and much more. It can complement your yoga practice by offering balance, strength, and creativity.

There are four degrees of Reiki, with the energy and knowledge being passed down from Reiki master to student via an attunement. The newly attuned practitioner acts as a vessel for Reiki to help heal themselves and others. The placing of hands on or above the recipient transmits the energy.

Though I didn’t have a name for it at the time, I experienced my first taste of energy work during adolescence. My grandmother introduced me to dream interpretation at a young age. Her inspiration and support paved the way towards my learning, practicing, and teaching Reiki.

“When the student is ready, the teacher appears.”

As I grew older, I suppressed this knowledge, until it thankfully reemerged during a troubled time. After the first session with my soon-to-be Reiki teacher, I knew it was going to make a huge impact on my life and those around me.

Perhaps you’ve been enlightened by another practitioner, or you’ve experienced a profound session of energy work. You will know if and when to take the leap. Here are five signs you may be ready to practice Reiki.

1. You love yourself, and appreciate all beings.

You possess a willingness to heal yourself from within, and a desire to expand this rejuvenation to the rest of the world. You are motivated to help the planet become a better place now, and for future generations.

2. You believe in alternative healing.

Conventional medicine serves an important purpose, but you also accept what is beyond tradition. You value yoga, bodywork, acupuncture, and the like. Though not a requirement, you may already be a massage therapist or yoga teacher.

3. The “unexplained” moments are welcome to you.

Maybe you can sense a person’s energy when they walk into a room, or feel a tingling sensation when you

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.doyouyoga.com/5-signs-may-ready-practice-reiki/

 

 

LEMONGRASS: MOOD ENHANCING STIMULATOR BY EVERYTHING SOULFUL

Lemongrass Is highly recommended for times when the emotions are embedded in misery and in need to overcome it.  It’s strong anti-depressant properties can always be relied upon to improve your mood.  This herb helps increase, clarify, and sweeten communication between people.  It’s antiseptic freshness makes it ideal for helping you to overcome illness.

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Lemongrass is ruled by Mercury and thus is helpful for developing magical skills.   It is commonly used to increase the power of amulets, to purify divination tools and spiritual preparations like baths. It can be added to water to cleanse a sacred space. It is a good anointing oil for meditation as it clears the mind, opens psychic channels and aids concentration.  Sprinkle Lemongrass Essential oil throughout the home, or use in aroma lamps scattered throughout the home, to repel any negativity from entering the home.

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Lemongrass is a cheerful, light hearted oil that serves as a reminder to keep things in perspective and not take them too seriously.  It can be used to get in touch with the inner child.  As a stimulating aphrodisiac it can be included in love potions and philtres.  It is said to have powers to encourage lust, protect one from infidelity and bring about honesty in a relationship.  Flavoring your food with it enhances romance and sexual pleasure.

Burn or carry a sachet of lemongrass when you are looking to remove or get through obstacles in your life.  Lemongrass is said to bring luck and ward off evil for those who are around it. With high spiritual vibrations and it’s cleansing properties, lemongrass has become an important

READ MORE HERE:  https://everythingsoulful.com/lemongrass-mood-enhancing-stimulator/

 

 

Dragon’s blood is not a magical concoction but a real ingredient in medicine, incense, and more. By Magda Origjanska

The so-called modern pagans frequently come upon “dragon’s blood” as one of the ingredients needed for their rituals. The name of this substance signifies the blood of a mythical, flying creature that, according to many stories, performs wonders and heals even the sorest of wounds and most grievous illnesses. Surprisingly, dragon’s blood is not only “real” but also has been used since ancient times as varnish, medicine, incense, and dye.

In some medieval encyclopedias, dragon’s blood is mentioned as the actual blood of dragons or elephants who perished in mortal combat.

In reality, dragon’s blood is actually a resin harvested from various plant species such as Croton, Dracaena, Daemonorops, Calamus rotang, and Pterocarpus. Its main feature is the red pigment that lends it the name dragon’s blood.

According to the book “Modern Herbal” by Maud Grieve, published in 1931, “The berries are the size of a cherry and pointed. When ripe they are covered with a reddish, resinous substance which is separated in several ways, the most satisfactory being by steaming, or by shaking or rubbing in coarse, canvas bags. An inferior kind is obtained by boiling the fruits to obtain a decoction after they have undergone the second process. The product may come to market in beads, joined as if forming a necklace, and covered with leaves … or in small, round sticks about 18 inches long, packed in leaves and strips of cane. Other varieties are found in irregular lumps, or in a reddish powder. They are known as lump, stick, reed, tear, or saucer Dragon’s Blood.”

Dracaena draco leaves showing dragon’s blood pigment at the base. The red pigment, called “dragon’s blood,” is said to have been used on Stradivarius violins. Photographed in the gardens of Lotusland—in Montecito, near Santa Barbara in southern California. Author: Sharktopus. CC BY-SA 3.0

Historical records of the Romans and Greeks also note Dracaena cinnabari, a byproduct of the cinnabar tree that was found on an island in the Indian Ocean. The resin of Dracaena species, the “authentic” dragon’s blood, and the extremely poisonous mineral cinnabar (mercury sulfide) were often confused by the ancient Romans. The types of dragon’s blood derived from different species were also hardly distinguished from one another in ancient China.

Dragon’s blood, powdered pigment or apothecary’s grade and roughly crushed incense. Author: Andy Dingley CC BY-SA 3.0

The pigment in the tree’s gum has numerous uses, including as a dye and also as a colorant in cosmetics. Some women used the powder in a ritual that was supposed to attract a marriage proposal. They would write their lover’s name on a tiny piece of paper, then their own name on the top, sprinkle it with some dragon’s blood, and fold it. Afterwards, they threw it onto burning charcoal while saying a prayer.

Dragon’s Blood Tree Author Rod Waddington. CC by 2.0

In the 18th century, dragon’s blood was used as a varnish for Italian violin makers. Moreover, there was a recipe for a toothpaste containing dragon’s blood. In India, it has been used in ceremonies for face painting or as a red varnish for wooden furniture. Another use of it was coloring the surface of writing paper, especially the decorative type that was used for weddings and during Chinese New Year.

In New Orleans voodoo and American hoodoo folk magic, it is used for attracting money or love and often as an incense that cleanses space and casts away negative energies. It is also added to ink to make “dragon’s blood ink,” a substance used to inscribe magical seals and talismans.

Dragon’s blood from Dracaena cinnabari. Sanguis draconis, Dracaena cinnabari. Author: Maša Sinreih in Valentina Vivod. CC BY-SA 3.0

The vibrant red color explains why dragon’s blood refers to the element of fire, and it’s often used in rituals that involve fire, heat, or power. In some traditions of folk magic, the resin is blended until it turns to oil. The oil of dragon’s blood is then applied to one’s wrists in order to

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/03/09/dragons-blood-2/