Seasonal affective disorder (SAD)

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD)

2-minute read

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which is only experienced at certain times of the year, usually in autumn and winter, has an negative impact on your mood. Treatment can often make a big difference.

What is seasonal affective disorder (SAD)?

SAD is a type of depression that comes and goes according to the season. People with SAD have symptoms of depression or mania at roughly the same time each year.

SAD usually develops in autumn and winter, then disappears in spring and summer. In some people, the symptoms develop in spring and early summer.

People with mental illness might find their symptoms change at different times of the year. For example, some people with bipolar disorder find they are more likely to experience mania in spring and summer and depression in winter.

What are the symptoms of SAD?

Symptoms usually start out mild and get worse as the season progresses. When the season changes, people normally become completely well again.

Symptoms of SAD in winter include:

  • lack of energy
  • sleeping too much
  • finding it hard to wake up in the morning
  • feeling very tired all the time
  • overeating and craving carbohydrates
  • gaining weight
  • losing interest in normal activities

Symptoms of SAD in summer include:

What causes SAD?

SAD is thought to be caused by changes to the body’s circadian rhythms (its ‘body clock’) at certain times of the year. It may also happen because in winter the body produces less of the

READ MORE HERE: https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/seasonal-affective-disorder

 

 

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