Why do we have daylight saving time? The 100-year history. By Erin Blakemore

Get the facts about springing forward and falling back, a tradition that was established in the U.S. in 1918.

People in the United States will feel a bit more refreshed on November 4 as daylight saving time 2018 ends. The clocks fall back at 2 a.m. ET on Sunday, ushering in three months of getting up in the dark until the winter solstice welcomes back the sun on December 22.

You’ve probably heard that Ben Franklin kind of proposed daylight saving time (also erroneously called daylight savings time) centuries before it was implemented, and that the twice-yearly switch was initially adopted to save us money on energy needs.

But if you dig deeper, you’ll find out that the daylight-hoarding tradition—which was adopted in the United States a hundred years ago—has an even more colorful

READ MORE HERE:

https://relay.nationalgeographic.com/proxy/distribution/public/amp/news/2018/03/daylight-savings-time-arizona-florida-spring-forward-science

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s