Who, What, Why: What is an equinox?

Equinox diagram

The equinox is being celebrated around the world – heralding autumn in the northern hemisphere and spring in the south. What is an equinox and how does it work, asks Justin Parkinson.

The name equinox means “equal night” in Latin. It’s theoretically the day of the year when all points on the earth’s surface experience the same lengths of daylight and darkness – 12 hours of each. The autumn equinox in the northern hemisphere (it’s the spring equinox for the southern hemisphere) always falls on 22, 23 or 24 September.

Imagine the earth orbiting the sun in a flat plane – ie as if it was pinned on the edge of a slightly elliptical disc. It spins on its axis as it does so – each turn making a day. But the earth also constantly tilts at an angle of 23.5 degrees to that flat plane as it orbits the sun.

This means, for half the year, the northern hemisphere is pointing slightly away from the sun, bringing shorter, colder days as it moves into winter. For the other half of the year it points slightly towards the sun, getting longer, hotter days, most extreme in high summer.

But the equinoxes (there’s one in March, too) are the points of the year where the part of the earth closest to the sun is the equator rather than places north or south of it. Everywhere from the North Pole to the South Pole gets the same number of hours of sunlight, just for those two days a year.

In theory everywhere on earth should get half a day of sun and half a day of darkness when an equinox happens. “But this is

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-34334712

 

 

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21 Hot Fall Drink Recipes For Savoring The Best Flavors Of The Season By KIRSTEN NUNEZ

Happy Fall, Ya’ll!  These drinkies by Kirsten Nunez really look delicious.  After you try them, let me know what you think!

Enjoy this day.  Blessed Be.

 

 

Now that it is officially fall, it is time to start curling up with hot autumn drinks, blankets, and a good book. There is something so comforting about warm seasonal drinks, after all. And if you are anything like me, you love learning how to whip them up in the comfort of your own home.

One might argue that it is easier to buy ready-made beverages from stores or cafes. I mean, America is known for having a Starbucks or McDonald’s around every corner. It is not difficult to find a pumpkin spice latte when the craving hits. Yet, making your own drinks at home is so rewarding. You can customize the flavors and control the level of sweetness. To top it off, you can alter the recipe to fit a special diet. For example, coconut or soy milk can be used to create a vegan pumpkin spice latte. Yum.

Luckily, you do not have to be Rachael Ray or Martha Stewart to successfully make your own fancy fall drinks. And you definitely do not need to be a barista. All it takes is practice, patience, and a little guidance. To get started, check out this diverse list of 21 hot drink recipes for the beloved autumn season. Get ready to indulge, folks.

1. Hot Apple Cider Rum Punch

Hot apple cider and rum come together in this innovative punch recipe by Brown Eyed Baker. Thanks to the apple, orange, and ginger, you’ll be treated to a burst of seasonal flavors in the very first sip.

2. Warm Spicy Apple & Carrot Drink

Get those autumn vibes going with this warm apple and carrot drink by Green Kitchen Stories. This delicious beverage boasts intense flavors such as fresh ginger, rosemary, and cinnamon. It’s extremely good for you, too.

3. Mulled Wine

Wine lovers will swoon over this tutorial by How Sweet Eats. The recipe features two different ways to make mulled wine; you can even customize the ingredients to fit your preferences. Get ready for your kitchen to smell ah-mazing.

4. Dirty Chai Latte

READ MORE HERE:  https://www.bustle.com/articles/185537-21-hot-fall-drink-recipes-for-savoring-the-best-flavors-of-the-season

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mabon 2014: Six Ways To Celebrate The Pagan Autumnal Equinox By Antonia Blumberg

The autumnal equinox falls on September 23 in 2014, marking the official first day of fall as well as the pagan holiday, Mabon, in the northern hemisphere.

Mabon is a harvest festival, the second of three, that encourages pagans to “reap what they sow,” both literally and figuratively. It is the time when night and day stand equal in duration; thus is it a time to express gratitude, complete projects and honor a moment of balance.

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“Mabon is a time to reflect on the previous year, when we can celebrate our successes (likened to bringing in the harvest) and assess which crops, projects, or dreams didn’t come to fruition,” the Los Angeles-based pagan leader Laurie Lovekraft told HuffPost.

The pagan website The White Goddess explains:

This is the time to look back not just on the past year, but also your life, and to plan for the future. In the rhythm of the year, Mabon is a time of rest and celebration, after the hard work of gathering the crops. Warm autumn days are followed by chill nights, as the Old Sun God returns to the embrace of the Goddess.

The holiday is named after the Welsh God, Mabon, son of Earth Mother goddess Modron.

Some pagans mark the holiday by enjoying rich feasts with seasonal foods like apples, pomegranates and root vegetables. Many also observe rituals honoring the goddess’ transition from mother to crone.

Lovekraft offered six ways to celebrate that can be done in small or large groups or individually:

1. Create an altar. This can be on a dining room table, hearth, or dresser with apples, leaves, pinecones, corn, pomegranate, squash, and root vegetables. Add gardening tools (scythe, baskets, hand trowel) and objects that are the colors of gold, orange, red, bronze, and rust. Light an orange or yellow candle and give thanks for the blessings of abundance you have in your life. (Always remember fire safety when working with candles and never leave a candle burning unattended!)

2. Ask for blessings. When lighting your candle, you can call to the Goddess in her Mother aspect and/or ask the Green Man to bless your harvest.

3. Do apple magic. Apples are often harvested in the fall. Cut an apple horizontally to reveal the hidden, five-pointed star (a pentagram) inside. Look for pentagonal forms around you (ex. five fingers and five toes, five petals of certain flowers, starfish, etc.)

4. Listen to music. Music is a wonderful way to get into the mood of Mabon! Songs by Lisa Thiel, the Reclaiming Tradition, and S.J. Tucker are especially evocative.

5. Meditate on balance. This is especially helpful if you are a family caregiver, but also if you have a high-stress job, pressure-filled commute, or have a lot of personal drama. Reflect on how you handle pressure, how you manage your and other people’s emotions, and how easily your peace of mind can be disrupted. Think about ways you can reduce stress and bring more balance to your days. Consider

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https://www.huffpost.com/entry/mabon-2014_n_5863384?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAMTD6RJGMejRnJGJqqyNXxfYZ2qWzjgAVxmyHg5-YRWXrMUL5t4r2kCM_h3M1VED6WeWh088W-ydTSrziuBOSTrqrP8I55lgS08u6yUGDbNfO5QTNXlhKmdWLAAptVzDyiqBw-KO0zRmPZd5VCW_GYiIU4BnWkeUWlrwSSt4DV6h

 

 

 

 

 

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